Course List - Riverland

Food Science Technology

Required Core Courses (16 credits)

  Course # Course Name Credits  
FSCI1000
Principles of Food Science
4
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FSCI1015
Food Quality and Safety

This course focuses on several aspects related to producing a quality food product. 

Students will become familiar with safe food handling procedures and product flow, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP), equipment and sanitization procedures, and the importance of governmental rules and regulations as they pertain to food safety and food defense.  Students are introduced to state and federal regulatory agencies involved in ensuring safe food.

(3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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FSCI1030
Food Product Development

This course will focus on the steps used by the food industry to take a new product from concept to consumer.  Students will have the opportunity to follow the process to take a product from concept to consumer by creating a product in the classroom & lab.  Participating in tours may also be incorporated into this course.

(3 Cr – 2 lect, 1 lab)

3
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FSCI1040
Food Processing

This course is designed to introduce the student to specific operations involved in the processing of raw foodstuffs into foods suitable for consumption or storage. Methods used to process and preserve a variety of foods will be examined. An emphasis will be placed on the investigation of various processing techniques that enhance food quality and/or control of microbial growth. The prevention of food spoilage will be a major focus of this course.(3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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BIOL1070
Human Nutrition (Goal 2 & 3)

This course explores the role of nutrition in promoting, maintaining, and improving the health of the human body. Traditional aspects of nutrition will be studied, as well as emerging issues and nutritional controversies. This course will focus on the science of nutrition, including nutrients and nutritional needs over the lifespan. This course will also cover the application of the principles of nutrition as they relate to individual food choices, health behaviors, public health, wellness, obesity, eating disorders, the use of supplements and botanicals, and the prevention of chronic disease. Issues facing society including food safety and sustainability will also be covered.

      MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3

MnTC General Education Courses (44 credits)

  Course # Course Name Credits  
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BIOL1091
General Biology I (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is the first semester of a two-semester course sequence in general biology. Topics include the scientific method, characteristics of life, biological chemistry, cell and membrane structure and function, enzymes, metabolism, mitosis, meiosis, genetics, the structure of DNA, and protein synthesis. This course includes laboratory exercises and experimentation that illustrate core principles covered in the course. Prerequisite: CHEM

1121 or 1201

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr – 3 lect, 1 lab)

4
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BIOL1092
General Biology II (Goal 3 & 10)

This course is the second semester of a two-semester course sequence in general biology. Topics include evolutionary biology, a survey of biological diversity, animal structure and function, plant structure and function, and ecology. This course includes laboratory exercises and experimentation that illustrate core principles covered in the course.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 1091. 

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

4
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BIOL2040
General Microbiology (Goal 2 & 3) (BIOL 1091 or 2021 prereq)

This introductory course is designed to provide an overview of major concepts in microbiology. Thematic areas to be studied include prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, prokaryotic metabolism (including growth and nutrition), microbial genetics, microbial classification, isolation, and identification, and microbial roles in the disease process, environment and industry.  Laboratory exercises will stress the microscopic study of microorganisms and the application of culturing and identification techniques.  An emphasis will be placed on safe laboratory practice.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 1091 or BIOL 2021.

MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr – 2 lect, 2 lab)

4
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CHEM1201
General Chemistry I (Goal 3 & 10)

This is the first course of a two semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry, Atomic Theory, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, chemical bonding, molecular structure, and atomic structure, periodicity, and the gas phase.  This course is for students  intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor’s preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing). Prerequisite: Math 1110 or concurrent registration in Math 1110.

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (5 Cr – 3 lect, 2 lab)

5
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CHEM1202
General Chemistry II (Goal 2 & 3)

This is the second course of a two-semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry. Content includes properties of solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.  This course is for students intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor’s preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing). Prerequisite: MATH 1110 and CHEM 1201 or CHEM 1210.

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (5 Cr – 3 lect, 2 lab)

5
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ENGL1101
Composition I (Goal 1 & 2) or ENGL1102 (Prerequisite grade of C or higher in ENGL0960 or appropriate placement test score)

This is an introductory college writing course designed to help students develop effective writing skills for college level work.  Students learn to generate ideas and organize them into unified, coherent essays.  Methods of instruction vary, but most sections combine individual conferences and peer review with regular class meetings.  Prerequisites:  A grade of C or higher in ENGL 0960 or appropriate placement score.

MnTC (Goals 1/CM and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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HLTH1100
Health

This course addresses major health concerns, common health threats, optimal personal health planning and current issues and topics related to overall health. Stress, fitness, nutrition addictive behaviors cardiovascular disease, cancer, infectious disease, sexuality, environmental health and social issues as well as drug and alcohol awareness and prevention are all an integral part of this course.   

(3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab) 

3
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MATH1110
College Algebra (Goal 2 & 4)

This course covers the basics of college level algebra emphasizing understanding of the basic principles through investigation.  The topics covered range from a basic algebra review to exploration of linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions along with a study of rational expressions, inverse relations, function operations, complex numbers, and systems of equations.  Prerequisites:  MATH 0670 with grade of C or better or appropriate placement test score.

MnTC (Goals 4/MA and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
MATH2021
Fundamentals of Statistics
4
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PHIL1130
Ethics (Goal 6 & 9)

This course introduces the student to fundamental ethical principles developed throughout the history of philosophy through the study of classical and modern writings. Students are encouraged and challenged to apply such principles to contemporary issues. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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SOCI1103
Social Problems (Goal 5 & 9)

This course focuses on the nature, dimensions, causes, and characteristics of selected social problems in modern society. The sociological perspective and critical thinking will be emphasized in examining theories, research, and programs for the prevention and reduction of social problems. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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SPCH1100
Fundamentals of Speech (Goal 1 & 9) or SPCH1110, SPCH1200 or SPCH1310

This course focuses on the theory and practice of public communication including individual and group presentations.  This course emphasizes audience analysis, organization, content development including topic selection and speaking ethics.  Students will prepare and deliver a variety of both individual and group presentations and demonstrate an ability to apply research from diverse sources.  Students should expect to reduce speech apprehension and develop self-confidence in their ability to communicate in public.

MnTC (Goals 1/CM and 9/EC); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

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Last Updated: May 29, 2018