Course List - Riverland

Agricultural Sciences

Required Core Courses (17 credits)

  Course # Course Name Credits  
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AGBS2000
Introduction to Agribusiness Management

This course provides students with a foundation in agribusiness management.  Employers desire a combination of technical and business management skills in potential employees.  This course includes the study of critical agribusiness skills and their application in the agribusiness industry.

(3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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AGSC1010
Introduction to Agronomy

This course provides an orientation into the profession of agricultural sciences. Combining theoretical and practical knowledge, students investigate plants, the principles and practices of crop production and management, precision farming, sustainability, biotechnology, marketing and sales related to agriculture. A special emphasis on real-world, innovative problem solving will provide students with a background to further specialize in producing and improving food crops. Important current societal issues related to modern agriculture are discussed throughout.

(3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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AGSC1020
Introduction to Soil Science

This course investigates the formation, classification, and composition of soils, with emphasis on environmental quality, chemical and physical properties affecting growth and nutrition of plants.  Management principles and practices are used to increase productivity and conserve soil and water resources for agronomic crops.

(3 Cr – 2 lect 1 lab)

3
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AGSC1030
Crop Production

Crop production and management practices for soybean, corn and other crops of economic importance to the region are analyzed.  The class emphasizes management practices including cover crops, crop rotation, conservation tillage and cultivation.  Plant characteristics related to growth, development, pests and diseases are examined.  Problem solving is stressed related to local conditions to maximize yields.  An emphasis is placed on sustainable agriculture practices.  Students apply and practice skills in a farm setting.

(4 Cr – 2 lect, 2 lab)

4
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AGSC2020
Principles of Animal Science I

This course is designed to introduce the student to the scientific theories, principles, and concepts related to animal production and management. An overview of animal welfare and safety issues will be explored.  Students will learn about anatomy & physiology, and their application to growth and development of food, companion and clinical (model) animals.  Key systems, such as skeletal, muscular, nervous, and other biological systems that impact reproduction and nutrition will be examined.  A special emphasis on real-world, creative problem solving will help students further specialize in animal agriculture. The use of innovation and design thinking skills to enhance learning outcomes through opportunities to conduct applied research and/or gain hands-on experience are also included. Where possible, live animals will be used during laboratories in accordance with federal regulations, and all laboratories will be conducted with respect for the animals.  Prerequisites: One year of introductory or general animal science coursework or instructor permission.

(4 Cr -3 lect, 1 lab)

4

MnTC General Education Courses (43 credits)

  Course # Course Name Credits  
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BIOL1091
General Biology I (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is the first semester of a two-semester course sequence in general biology. Topics include the scientific method, characteristics of life, biological chemistry, cell and membrane structure and function, enzymes, metabolism, mitosis, meiosis, genetics, the structure of DNA, and protein synthesis. This course includes laboratory exercises and experimentation that illustrate core principles covered in the course. Prerequisite: CHEM

1121 or 1201

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr – 3 lect, 1 lab)

4
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BIOL1092
General Biology II (Goal 3 & 10)

This course is the second semester of a two-semester course sequence in general biology. Topics include evolutionary biology, a survey of biological diversity, animal structure and function, plant structure and function, and ecology. This course includes laboratory exercises and experimentation that illustrate core principles covered in the course.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 1091. 

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

4
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CHEM1121
General, Organic, and Biochemistry (Goal 3 & 10)

This is a laboratory science course covering the principles of general, organic and biological chemistry with emphasis on chemical applications in biological systems.  Topics include the scientific method, atomic theory, chemical bonding, organic functional groups, biological chemicals, and metabolic processes.

      MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

3
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ECON1100
Introduction to Economics (Goals 2 & 5)

This course is an analysis of current United States and world policies, issues and problems using some basic principles of economics. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 2/CT); (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

2
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ECON2291
Macroeconomics (Goal 5 & 8)

This course introduces the basic principles and methods of economics and then applies them to national income accounts, aggregate supply and demand, business cycles, economic growth and monetary and fiscal policy. There will be a special emphasis on international trade and the global economy. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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ECON2292
Microeconomics (Goal 5 & 8)

This course is an analysis of current United States and world policies, issues and problems using some basic principles of economics with special emphasis on decision making by individuals and firms. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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ENGL1101
Composition I (Goal 1 & 2) or ENGL1102 (Prerequisite grade of C or higher in ENGL0960 or appropriate placement test score)

This is an introductory college writing course designed to help students develop effective writing skills for college level work.  Students learn to generate ideas and organize them into unified, coherent essays.  Methods of instruction vary, but most sections combine individual conferences and peer review with regular class meetings.  Prerequisites:  A grade of C or higher in ENGL 0960 or appropriate placement score.

MnTC (Goals 1/CM and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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GEOG1200
Human Geography (Goal 5 & 10)

This course introduces the worldwide effects of human occupancy of the earth and the influences of location on human behavior.  Topics include patterns in spaces, cultural influences, and means of livelihood, political spaces and human effects on the environment.

MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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ENGL1113
Creative Writing: Nonfiction (Goal 6 & 7) or ENGL1115

This is an introductory writing course in creative nonfiction. In lecture/workshop format, students examine models, then write and revise essays drawn from personal experience, memory, observation and reflection. Writing is shared in small groups and/or individual conferences. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and Goal 7/HD); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

1
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GLST1500
Introduction to Global Studies (Goal 5 & 8)

This course introduces students to the basic concepts, trends, and interconnectiveness of globalization throughout the world. In class, students may examine journal articles, book chapters, videos, and webcasts in the study of globalization across disciplines. It will provide an overview of history and theoretical approaches that have created a global society. This is a required course for the Global Studies Emphasis. Completion of English 1101 and 1104 or 1105 or 1106 is suggested prior to enrollment in this course. MnTC Goals (5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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MATH1110
College Algebra (Goal 2 & 4)

This course covers the basics of college level algebra emphasizing understanding of the basic principles through investigation.  The topics covered range from a basic algebra review to exploration of linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions along with a study of rational expressions, inverse relations, function operations, complex numbers, and systems of equations.  Prerequisites:  MATH 0670 with grade of C or better or appropriate placement test score.

MnTC (Goals 4/MA and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
MATH2021
Fundamentals of Statistics
4
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PHIL1130
Ethics (Goal 6 & 9)

This course introduces the student to fundamental ethical principles developed throughout the history of philosophy through the study of classical and modern writings. Students are encouraged and challenged to apply such principles to contemporary issues. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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PHYS1000
Introduction to Physics (Goal 2 & 3)

This is an introductory course covering basic physics concepts and laws that govern everyday physical phenomena. This course is intended for students with no previous physics experience. Topics include mechanics, properties of matter, heat, waves, and electricity. Students will learn to apply basic physics principles through problem solving, simulations, and laboratory experiments. Prerequisites:  MATH 0660 (Intermediate Algebra I) with a grade of C or better or appropriate placement score.

MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr – 2 lect, 1 lab)   

3
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SOCI1103
Social Problems (Goal 5 & 9)

This course focuses on the nature, dimensions, causes, and characteristics of selected social problems in modern society. The sociological perspective and critical thinking will be emphasized in examining theories, research, and programs for the prevention and reduction of social problems. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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SPCH1100
Fundamentals of Speech (Goal 1 & 9) or SPCH1110; SPCH1200 or SPCH1310

This course focuses on the theory and practice of public communication including individual and group presentations.  This course emphasizes audience analysis, organization, content development including topic selection and speaking ethics.  Students will prepare and deliver a variety of both individual and group presentations and demonstrate an ability to apply research from diverse sources.  Students should expect to reduce speech apprehension and develop self-confidence in their ability to communicate in public.

MnTC (Goals 1/CM and 9/EC); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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Last Updated: August 16, 2016