MnTC/General Education

  Course # Course Name Credits  
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ANTH2220
Introduction to Anthropology (Goal 5 & 10)

This course is an introduction to the field of anthropology and its sub-disciplines: cultural anthropology, archaeology, physical/biological anthropology and linguistic anthropology. A major theme of this course is the interaction between human biology, culture and the natural environment. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment, Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences

3
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ANTH2240
Cultural Anthropology (Goal 5 & 8)

This course introduces cultural and social processes that influence human behavior using comparative examples from different cultural groups and historical periods with the goal of better understanding the broad range of human behavioral potentials and those influences that shape the different expressions of these potentials. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

3
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ARTS1101
Introduction to Art (Goal 6 & 8)

This course is designed for the beginning student who wishes to get a better understanding of the concepts in art. Master works of art of many cultures, past and present, are examined and analyzed allowing the student to develop an art vocabulary, and knowledge of formal elements and principles of design related to specific works of art. Once basic elements and principles are mastered, the student will gain the confidence to examine, understand, and appreciate any work of art, traditional or contemporary. Recommended for art majors. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 studio)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

3
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ARTS1102
Art History I (Goal 6 & 8)

This course is a survey of historical works of art. Architecture, sculpture, and painting are studied in the context of the periods in which they were produced. Each artistic period is examined in light of social, economic, and cultural significance. This study of artistic expression begins with the earliest attempt at image making and continues through the 15th Century. Recommended for art majors. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 studio)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

3
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ARTS1103
Art History II (Goal 6 & 8)

This course is a survey of art that will begin with the 14th century and proceed to the present. Architecture, sculpture, and painting are viewed in stylistic classes on the basis of their likeness and the periods in which they were produced. Each artistic period is examined in light of social, economic, and human development within each given era. Completing ARTS 1102 before this course enhances student learning. Recommended for art majors. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 studio)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

3
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ARTS1112
Drawing I (Goal 2 & 6)

This course is designed for the beginning drawing student and provides a fundamental experience with drawing materials and tools in the context of drawing practices. Observational drawing will be stressed. Additionally, students will work from imagination, master drawings and photographic sources. Studio problems include exercises in the manipulation, organization, and control of the visual elements and principles of design. This course concludes with a beginning experience in drawing with color media. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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ARTS1119
Cultural Arts (Goal 6 & 8)

This course is designed to introduce students to artworks found and produced in diverse cultures around the globe. Students will utilize craft media to experience the arts and use a variety of cultural perspectives to develop an appreciation and greater understanding of the cultural diversity existing in the art world. The relationship between the material culture (arts and crafts) and non-material culture (values and beliefs) of a society will be researched and analyzed to develop a sense of aesthetics applied to artworks from diverse cultures.MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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ARTS1122
2 Dimensional Design (Goal 2 & 6)

This course is an introduction to the study of the principles and elements of design. Assignments will focus on the student's ability to translate the design concepts into two-dimensional (2-D) works of art. Structured projects enable students to critically explore 2-D design. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

3
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ARTS1123
3 Dimensional Design (Goal 2 & 6)

This foundation course presents the concept of art in three-dimensional (3-D) as seen in a variety of sculptural works that span time and cultures. Exploration of arts and humanities through interaction with a variety of 3-D media in expressing concepts in visual communication will develop an awareness of aesthetics in both process and finished works of art. Formal critiques of art work, personal and others will expand the creative process and develop an appreciation of 3-D design. The study and analysis of the elements and principles of design as they apply to the composition of 3-D art will provide the students with the foundation needed to create these works of art while also experiencing a variety of media to discover their possibilities for expression and communication. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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ARTS1222
Ceramics I (Goal 6 & 8)

This course explores ceramics from an historical and a global perspective developing an appreciation of ceramic works of art. Arts and humanities are explored through research in the discipline of ceramics and interaction with clay as media. This exploration will develop an awareness of aesthetics in both process and finished works of art. Formal critiques of art work, personal and others, will expand the creative process and develop appreciation for ceramics. This course covers the foundations and fundamentals of creating in clay. Basic hand building and wheel techniques will be introduced through hands-on instruction. The philosophies and processes of working with clay will be experienced from conception through the finished fired state. Techniques will be demonstrated by the instructor to teach the skill involved and to appreciate the possibilities of each. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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ARTS1226
Painting I (Goal 2 & 6)

This course is an introduction to fundamentals of acrylic painting, methods and materials. Beginning students will learn how to utilize acrylic painting techniques. This course will allow the student to discover the properties of acrylic paint and how to control consistency, thinning, drying, application, compatibility with other media, types of brushes and supports that will aid the student toward the completion of an art work. After studio problems of acrylic painting techniques are explored, the student will be encouraged to experiment on their own exploring heightened acrylic painting possibilities. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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ASTR1000
Introduction to Astronomy (Goal 2 & 3)

This introductory course in astronomy focuses on the goal of learning the basic principles of astronomy, as well as being able to apply those principles to the study of various objects in our solar system, i.e. the solar planetary system, the sun, comets, asteroids, etc. Building rudimentary telescopes with lenses, studying celestial objects through a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, examination of various astronomical models, etc, provide in-class, lab-like experiences for students of the course. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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BIOL1000
Biological Science (Goal 2 & 3)

This is a one-semester course is designed for students who do not plan to major in science. Emphasis is placed on the major biological principles and their relationship to man and ecology. Topics studied include the scientific method, characteristics of life, biological chemistry, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, classification and ecology. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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BIOL1010
Principles of Environmental Science (Goal 3 & 10)

This course covers general ecological principles related to human impacts on the environment. Environmental problems including population, land use, resources, energy, water pollution, and air pollution will be addressed. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment, Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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BIOL1020
Current Topics in Biology (Goal 3 & 9)

This course is designed for students who do not plan to major in science. The primary, organizing themes of the course are centered upon learning the basic concepts and theories of life science integrated with issues of current interest and analyzing the current issues from the perspective of ethical and civic responsibility. Biological concepts and theories included in the course are the scientific method, biological molecules, cell biology, evolution, classification, genomics and genetics, ecology and environmental issues, and emerging infectious diseases. Thus the course introduces the concepts of biology and its applications essential to understanding life's parts and processes. Relevant ethical theories will be introduced and applied to the current issues discussed. Due to the nature of the course, the current issues will vary. An overall course objective is to acquaint the student with biologically related current issues that have profound, ethical social, and/or moral implications for each citizen and for our society as a whole. Upon completing the course, the student should have a basic understanding of the issues raised (i.e. basic information about the biology involved), have an ability to critically analyze and discuss the issues, be able to articulate a position on appropriate issues, and support the position. The student will also gain experience in utilizing library and /or Internet research resources. This course also is activity-centered and includes lab-like activities including environmental analysis, case study analysis, biochemical testing for biological molecules, practicing techniques associated with DNA extraction and fingerprinting, microscopic study of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, population projections, cloning DNA, identifying structures and processes of mitosis and meiosis, and additional lab-like activities as appropriate to the topics studied. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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BIOL1030
Human Biology (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is an introductory study of human biology. The scientific method, biological molecules, and cell biology will be studied as a foundation to learning human histology (the study of tissues) and organ systems. Each human organ system will be investigated to develop an understanding of its contribution to the human body. Current health and social issues, and other diseases related to human biology, will also be studied. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab) BIOL

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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BIOL1040
Biology of Women (Goal 3 & 7)

This course is designed to explore aspects of biology that apply specifically to women. The course examines the following areas: genetics of sex determination, male and female reproductive systems, gender development, reproductive biology, intelligence, aging, disease, behavior and evolution as it relates to the biology of women. Issues regarding human diversity will be considered as they arise as well as perceived and actual gender differences between men and women. Upon completing the course, the student should have a basic understanding of the issues raised (i.e. basic information about the biology involved), have an ability to critically analyze and discuss the issues, be able to articulate a position on appropriate issues relevant to the student goals, objectives and outcomes related to human diversity, and support the position. The student will also gain experience in utilizing library and /or Internet research resources. This course also is activity-centered and includes lab-like activities including case study analysis, histology, female and male and anatomy, female and male reproductive issues, identifying structures and processes of mitosis and meiosis, and additional lab-like activities as appropriate to the topics studied. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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BIOL1050
Introduction to Forensic Science (Goal 2 & 3)

This introductory course will apply the principles and theories of biology, chemistry, etc. to the study of forensic science. Forensic science is the application of science to those criminal and civil laws that are enforced by police agencies in a criminal justice system. The focus of forensic science is the crime lab using the principles and techniques of biology, chemistry, anthropology and other sciences in order to analyze physical evidence. Topics include an overall orientation to criminalistics including the crime scene, physical evidence, physical properties of glass and soil, organic and inorganic analysis, the use of the microscope, the study of hair, fibers, paints, and drugs, voice and document examination, computer and Internet forensics, forensic technology, forensic serology, the use of DNA as a forensic tool, fingerprints, and firearms, tool marks, and other impressions. This course is activity-based and the student participates in a variety of lab-like experiences demonstrating the principles covered in the course and illuminating how scientific experimentation and research are performed and interpreted. (MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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BIOL1091
General Biology I (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is the first semester of a two-semester course sequence in general biology. Topics include: the scientific method, characteristics of life, biological chemistry, cell and membrane structure and function, enzymes, metabolism, mitosis, meiosis, genetics, the structure of DNA, and protein synthesis. This course includes laboratory exercises and experimentation that illustrate core principles covered in the course. Prerequisite: CHEM 1101 or 1121 or 1201.

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr – 3 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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BIOL1092
General Biology II (Goal 3 & 10)

This course is the second semester of a two-semester course sequence in general biology. Topics include evolutionary biology, a survey of biological diversity, animal structure and function, plant structure and function, and ecology. This course includes laboratory exercises and experimentation that illustrate core principles covered in the course.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 1091. 

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment, Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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BIOL2020
Human Nutrition (Goal 2 & 3)

This course explores the role of nutrition in promoting, maintaining, and improving the health of the human body. Traditional aspects of nutrition will be studied, as well as emerging issues and nutritional controversies. This course will focus on the science of nutrition, including nutrients and nutritional needs over the lifespan. This course will also cover the application of the principles of nutrition as they relate to individual food choices, health behaviors, public health, wellness, obesity, eating disorders, the use of supplements and botanicals, and the prevention of chronic disease. Issues facing society including food safety and biotechnology will also be discussed. Lab-like activities included in this course are the anatomy and physiology of the human body especiallyas related to digestion and nutrition, histology, case studies, the chemical study and biochemical identification of the biological molecules, vitamins, minerals, and water, a study of foodborne-illness and the microbes responsible, a research study of world population, nutrition and hunger issues, and other activities as appropriate. The final project is tracking self-dietary choices for a month using professional software, and utilizing the analysis to identify patterns, better choices, etc. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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BIOL2021
Principles of Anatomy and Physiology I (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is the first semester of a two-semester course in human anatomy and physiology. Basic concepts in biology are covered in the first part of the course including the scientific method, biological chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism, cell division, genetics, and DNA structure and function. The second part of the course includes histology and the integumentary system, as well as the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 1101, 1121 or 1201. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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BIOL2022
Principles of Anatomy and Physiology II (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is the second semester of a two-semester course in human anatomy and physiology. Topics include the nervous system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system, the lymphatic and immune system, digestive system, urinary system, and the reproductive system. Acid-base and fluid balances, human embryology and development are also covered. Prerequisite: BIOL 2021. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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BIOL2040
General Microbiology (Goal 2 & 3)

This introductory course is designed to provide an overview of major concepts in microbiology. Thematic areas to be studied include prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, prokaryotic metabolism (including growth and nutrition), microbial genetics, microbial classification, isolation, and identification, and microbial roles in the disease process, environment and industry.  Laboratory exercises will stress the microscopic study of microorganisms and the application of culturing and identification techniques.  An emphasis will be placed on safe laboratory practice.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 1091 or BIOL 2021.

MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr – 2 lect, 2 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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CHEM1000
Introductory Chemistry (Goal 3 & 10)

This is a laboratory science course for students not intending to major in chemistry or science. Topics include atomic theory, and structure, chemical bonding, chemical accounting (mass and volume relationships), acids and bases, as well as an introduction to organic and biological compounds. MnTC (Goal 3/NS, and 10/PE); (4 Cr 3 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment, Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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CHEM1121
General, Organic, and Biochemistry (Goal 3 & 10)

This is a laboratory science course covering the principles of general, organic and biological chemistry with emphasis on chemical applications in biological systems. Topics include the scientific method, atomic theory, chemical bonding, organic functional groups, biological chemicals, and metabolic processes. MnTC (Goals 3/NS, 10/PE); (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment, Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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CHEM1201
General Chemistry I (Goal 3 & 10)

This is the first course of a two semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry, Atomic Theory, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, chemical bonding, molecular structure, and atomic structure, periodicity, and the gas phase.  This course is for students  intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor’s preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing). Prerequisite: Math 1110 or concurrent registration in Math 1110.

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (5 Cr – 3 lect, 2 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment, Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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CHEM1202
General Chemistry II (Goal 2 & 3)

This is the second course of a two-semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry. Content includes properties of solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.  This course is for students intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor’s preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing). Prerequisite: MATH 1110 and CHEM 1201.

       MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (5 Cr – 3 lect, 2 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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DIGI1100
Introduction to Digital Media (Goal 2 & 6)

This course is an introductory exposure to the creative process, integrating fundamental aspects of art, music, theatre, and film with new technology in digital media. Students will apply learned visual, aural, and design principals by creating and editing digital images, sound, and video using the Mac OS. Students will address multimedia concepts in the development and creation of a final interdisciplinary project. MnTC (Goals 2/CT and 6/HU); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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ECON1100
Introduction to Economics (Goals 2 & 5)

This course is an analysis of current United States and world policies, issues and problems using some basic principles of economics. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 2/CT); (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences

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ECON2291
Macroeconomics (Goal 5 & 8)

This course introduces the basic principles and methods of economics and then applies them to national income accounts, aggregate supply and demand, business cycles, economic growth and monetary and fiscal policy. There will be a special emphasis on international trade and the global economy. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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ECON2292
Microeconomics (Goal 5 & 8)

This course is an analysis of current United States and world policies, issues and problems using some basic principles of economics with special emphasis on decision making by individuals and firms. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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ENGL1101
Composition I (Goal 1 & 2)

This is an introductory college writing course designed to help students develop effective writing skills for college level work.  Students learn to generate ideas and organize them into unified, coherent essays.  Methods of instruction vary, but most sections combine individual conferences and peer review with regular class meetings.  Prerequisites:  A grade of C or higher in ENGL 0960 or appropriate placement score.
MnTC (Goals 1/CM and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 1 - Communication, Goal 2 - Critical Thinking

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ENGL1103
Introduction to Literature (Goal 6 & 8)

This is an introductory literature course designed to increase a student's critical and analytical skills in reading. Included is a study of literature by genre: the short story, drama, poetry and the novel. Emphasis in the selections is on American and English literature although some works in translation are read. Critical and interpretive papers are required. MnTC (Goals 6/ HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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ENGL1104
Composition II: Argument (Goal 1 & 2; Prereq ENGL1101)

This second semester composition course is designed as a continuation of ENGL 1101.  It teaches the skills needed to write clear and coherent essays using different modes of expository prose such as process, comparison and contrast, classification, and definition.  It will culminate in the study of argumentative writing in which the student learns to defend a position and argue a thesis with reason and evidence. Prerequisite:  ENGL 1101
MnTC (Goal 1/CM and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 1 - Communication

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ENGL1105
Composition II: Research (Goal 1 & 2; Prereq ENGL1101)

This is a second semester composition course focused on the writing of an academic research paper.  Students learn how to employ the resources of an academic library and how to cite those sources in a fully documented analytical/interpretive term paper.  Prerequisites: ENGL 1101.
MnTC (Goals 1/CM and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 1 - Communication

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ENGL1106
Composition II: Journalism (Goal 1 & 2; Prereq ENGL1101)

This is a second semester composition course based upon writing journalistic pieces and researching topics related to the practice and craft of journalism. Students will learn ways of interviewing and writing for various media, including print, broadcast, and online formats, study ethical issues facing journalists, and explore diversity issues specific to journalism. Students will also develop an understanding of First Amendment rights related to Freedom of the Press, the Freedom of Information Act, and the special role journalism plays in a democracy. Prerequisites: ENGL 1101
MnTC (Goals 1/CM and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 1 - Communication

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ENGL1113
Creative Writing: Nonfiction (Goal 6 & 7)

This is an introductory writing course in creative nonfiction. In lecture/workshop format, students examine models, then write and revise essays drawn from personal experience, memory, observation and reflection. Writing is shared in small groups and/or individual conferences. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and Goal 7/HD); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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ENGL1115
Creative Writing: Fiction (Goal 6 & 7)

This is an introductory writing course in creative fiction. In lecture/workshop format, students examine fiction models, noting technique for creating believable character, dialogue and conflict. Students then create one or several works of fiction. Writing is shared in small groups and/or individual conferences. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and Goal 7/HD); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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ENGL1131
Fiction (Goal 6 & 7)

This course is the analytic study of short stories and novels. British and American authors are emphasized, though some literature in translation is read. Focus is on how to read narrative fiction with maximum understanding and critical judgment. MnTC (Goal 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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ENGL1132
Ethnic Literature (Goal 6 & 7)

This course explores literary works from a variety of American ethnic groups. Focus is on the text as a work of art created by an ethnic writer. Students will examine ways in which the writer's ethnicity may influence the text, the ways the text reflects/critiques/endorses the writer's ethnic group, and the ways the text reflects/critiques/endorses the dominant culture. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and Goal 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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ENGL2000
Advanced Creative Writing (Goal 2 & 6)

This is an introductory writing course in creative prose and poetry.  In lecture/workshop format, students examine and evaluate creative writing models and peer writing, noting word choice, rhythm, character development and conflict.  Students will create a portfolio of their writing to be shared in small groups and/or individual conferences.  Students will also participate in the organization and facilitation of a creative arts journal open to all Riverland students.
MnTC (Goals 6 /HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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ENGL2231
Modern Literature (Goal 6 & 7)

This course explores literary developments from World War I to the present, drawing readings from a variety of genres and cultures. Emphasis will be placed not only on analysis and understanding of the texts, but on the social, historical, cultural, and psychological factors that influence and shape literature of the 20th century. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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ENGL2241
American Literature I (Goal 6 & 7)

This course explores developments in American Literature between 1492 and 1865. Students will explore both historical and formal developments affecting literature of this period, as well as similarities/differences among the works covered. Specific issues addressed may include early written representations of America, the influence of Puritanism on American writers, important documents of the Federalist period, and the American Romantic movement, including Transcendentalism. MNTC (Goals 6/HUand 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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ENGL2242
American Literature II (Goal 6 & 7)

This course explores developments in American Literature between 1865 and the present. Students will explore both historical and formal developments affecting literature of this period, as well as the similarities/differences among the works covered. Some of the specific issues addressed include the rise of Realism and Naturalism, Regionalism and Post-Modernism. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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ENGL2251
English Literature (Goal 6 & 9)

This course requires students to read, understand, and appreciate the different periods of English literature. The significant works of major English authors from the time of Chaucer to the present are studied. Authors include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, Pope, Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Yeats, Joyce, Eliot, and Auden. Terminology associated with literary analysis will allow students the insight into the human experience through literature. Critical reading, thinking, and writing skills are emphasized.Previous course work in literature is recommended. MNTC (Goals 6/HU and 9 EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 Lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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ENGL2255
Introduction to Shakespeare (Goal 2 & 6)

This course requires students to read, discuss, and analyze some of Shakespeare's major works, including comedies, histories, tragedies, romances, and poetry. Emphasis will be placed on the historical context in which the works were created (including Elizabethan dramatic conventions), the aesthetic value and power of his work, and his continuing influence on literature and drama. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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ESCI1000
Earth Science (Goal 3 & 10)

This course covers the development of the earth throughout its history and relates to processes observed today. Special emphasis is placed on the study of volcanoes, earthquakes, geologic structures, and various types of rocks. Also studied in the course is the interdependence between geologic processes and the environment with special emphasis given to how people cope with changing environmental conditions. Hands-on study of various rocks, examination of various geological models, etc, provide in-class, lab-like experience for students of this course. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment, Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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FREN1101
Elementary French I (Goal 6 & 8)

This course will provide a basic knowledge of the French language and culture. Students will develop skills in the areas of listening, reading, speaking, writing and grammar in French. These skills will be learned in the context of French culture. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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FREN1102
Elementary French II (Goal 6 & 8)

This course will provide a basic knowledge of the French language and culture in a continuation of French 1101. Students will further develop skills in the areas of listening, reading, speaking, writing, and grammar in French in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards. These skills will be learned in the context of French culture. Prerequisites: FREN 1101 or instructor approval. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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FREN2110
Intermediate French I (Goal 6 & 8)

This course will provide a better knowledge of the French language and culture and continue to build on the skills acquired in French 1101 and 1102. Students will further develop skills in the areas of listening, reading, speaking, writing and grammar in French in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards. These skills will be taught in the context of French culture. Prerequisites: FREN 1102 or equivalent. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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FREN2112
Intermediate French II (Goal 6 & 8)

This course will provide a better knowledge of the French language and culture and continue to build on the skills acquired in French 2110. Students will further develop skills in the areas of listening, reading, speaking, writing, and grammar in French. These skills will be taught in the context of French culture in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards. Prerequisites: FREN 2110 or equivalent. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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GEOG1200
Human Geography (Goal 5 & 10)

This course introduces the worldwide effects of human occupancy of the earth and the influences of location on human behavior. Topics include patterns in spaces, cultural influences, means of livelihood, political spaces and human effects on the environment. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment, Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences,Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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HIST1001
United States History: Colonial to 1877 (Goal 5 & 7)

This survey course examines the genesis of American culture, society and politics in the colonial period to the Revolution. It also includes the study of the early national period to the post-Civil War years.MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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HIST1002
United States History: 1877 - Present (Goal 5 & 7)

This survey course emphasizes the settlement of the West, industrialism, the rise of the United States to world power, and the post-World War II gender, racial and class revolutions, which helped move the American reality closer to the American ideal. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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HIST1011
Early European History (Ancient to 1688) (Goal 5 & 8)

This survey course explores the European history from its origins to “Glorious Revolution” of 1688 in England. The course will especially focus on the Greco-Roman roots of western civilization, the medieval period, the Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation.

MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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HIST1012
Modern European History (1688 – Present) (Goal 5 & 8)

This survey course looks at modern European civilization from the “Glorious Revolution” of 1688 in England to present.  It focuses on the political revolutions of the nineteenth-century, industrialism, imperialism, and the twentieth-century decline of European power.


MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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HIST1020
Minnesota History (Goal 5 & 7)

This survey course examines Minnesota's historical development from the pre-Columbian period to the present. It will especially focus on the loss of Native American control of the state, as well as the development of Minnesota's unique political culture. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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HIST1030
Modern World History (Goal 5 & 8)

This survey course examines world history from the late nineteenth-century to the present. It focuses on the decline of European global domination, the world wars, the Cold War, "Third World" liberation movements and the rise of non-European powers. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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HUMA1101
Humanities I (Goal 6 & 8)

This course examines the artifacts of prehistory and the birth of civilizations in Egypt and ancient Sumer. An examination of the Classical legacy, the contribution of Greece and Rome, is followed by a study of the patterns of life and art in the Medieval West. The course culminates in a study of the flowering of ideas and arts of the Renaissance. In all content areas instruction will focus and emphasis will be placed on history, literature, art, philosophy, architecture, music, and archeology. This course may also include arts and culture in non-Western societies. MnTC Goals (6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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HUMA1102
Humanities II (Goal 6 & 8)

This course examines the High Renaissance including the challenge of the Protestant Reformation and its response - the Counter Reformation. A view of the Baroque style in art, architecture and literature is counterpointed by examining the rise of science with its confidence in the power of human reason and culminating with an analysis of eighteenth century art, music, and society. Students will investigate the progress from Realism to Modernism in the 19th and 20th Centuries. In all content areas instruction will focus and emphasis will be placed on history, literature, art, philosophy, architecture, music, and archeology. This course may also include arts and culture in non-Western societies. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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HUMA1103
Popular Culture (Goal 2 & 6)

This course explores the role and importance of Popular Culture in America. In particular, students will examine the ways their own values and beliefs are shaped by the popular culture surrounding them. The course may include exploration of television, popular music, film, sports, advertising, and cyber culture. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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HUMA2263
Religions of the World (Goal 6 & 10)

This course examines the major world religions and their "sub-groups." Emphasis is placed on when, where and under what influences the various religions developed, the geographical areas of the world where the religions are located, as well as the primary tenents, qualities and characteristics of the religions. The course examines the place and role of religion in human life. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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MATH1050
Mathematics for Liberal Arts (Goal 2 & 4)

This course is an exploration of a variety of areas of mathematics designed for students who are majoring in various areas of the liberal arts or in elementary education. Introductory material in sets, logic, probability, statistics, and consumer mathematics will be applied using a problem solving approach. Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra or MATH 0660 or a score of 70 or more on the elementary algebra portion of the placement test, and a score of 63 on the reading comprehension portion of the placement test. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 4 - Mathematical/Logical Reasoning

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MATH1110
College Algebra (Goal 2 & 4)

This course covers the basics of college level algebra emphasizing understanding of the basic principles through investigation. The topics covered range from a basic algebra review to exploration of linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions along with a study of rational expressions, inverse relations, function operations, complex numbers, and systems of equations. Prerequisites: MATH 0670 with grade of C or better or appropriate placement test score. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 4 - Mathematical/Logical Reasoning

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MATH1115
Pre Calculus (Goal 2 & 4)

This course is for students requiring further experience with advanced algebra prior to calculus. Topics include trigonometric functions and their inverses, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, complex numbers, linear and non-linear inequalities and equations; mathematical induction, analytic trigonometry, sequences, series, higher order rational, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Optional: matrices, vectors, graphing polar equations Prerequisite: Math 1110 with grade of C or better or qualifying score on placement exam. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (5 Cr - 5 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 4 - Mathematical/Logical Reasoning

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MATH1210
Calculus & Analytic Geometry I (Goal 2 & 4)

This course covers the basics of calculus emphasizing understanding of the basic principles through investigation.  The course begins with a review of functions and continues with limits, rates of change, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives, and antiderivatives. Concepts are presented graphically and numerically as well as algebraically. Prerequisites:  MATH 1120 or MATH 1115 with a grade of C or better; or instructor permission.   

MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (5 Cr – 5 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 4 - Mathematical/Logical Reasoning

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MATH1220
Calculus & Analytic Geometry II (Goal 2 & 4)

The second-semester course in this calculus sequence focuses on applications of the definite integral, inverse functions and their derivatives, differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, hyperbolic, and inverse hyperbolic functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals; conic sections, polar coordinates, sequences, series, and convergence tests. Prerequisite: MATH 1210 with a grade of C or better. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (5 Cr 5 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 4 - Mathematical/Logical Reasoning

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MATH1400
Introduction to Calculus (Goal 2 & 4)

This course is for students requiring a single course in calculus. Topics studied will include limits, differentiation of elementary functions, differentials, integration of standard forms, applications of the derivative, applications of the integral, and an introduction to partial derivatives. Students who plan to earn credit in more than one calculus course should register for MATH 1210-1220.Prerequisite: MATH 1110 or equivalent.MnTC (Goals 4/MA and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 4 - Mathematical/Logical Reasoning

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MUSC1101
Music Theory/SS/ET I (Goal 2 & 6)

This course is the first semester of music theory designed for music students, elementary education students, or anyone desiring to learn the basics of music and to develop or improve skills in reading and notating music. It includes pitch and rhythmic notation, major, minor and modal scales, key signatures, triads, beginning melody and harmonization. This course also integrates sight singing and ear training. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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MUSC1111
Survey of Music (Goal 6 & 8)

This course is a survey of music and musical style from the beginning of recorded music history through the present. It includes a brief introduction to musical elements and is designed for the student who has little or no training in music. It combines instruction in musical terminology with extensive, critical listening along with an overview of the history of Western music. MnTC (Goal 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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MUSC1123
College Choir (Goal 2 & 6)

This course is a choir that studies and performs works from the broad spectrum of choral literature.  Instruction emphasizes healthy choral/vocal techniques, improved note and score reading, and expanded knowledge of musical notation, terminology, and styles.  This course rehearses 150 minutes per week and does not require an audition.

MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr – 1 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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MUSC1124
College Choir (Goal 2 & 6)

This course is a choir that studies and performs works from the broad spectrum of choral literature.  Instruction emphasizes healthy choral/vocal techniques, improved note and score reading, and expanded knowledge of musical notation, terminology, and styles.  This course rehearses 150 minutes per week and does not require an audition.

MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr – 1 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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MUSC2123
College Choir (Goal 2 & 6)

This course is a choir that studies and performs works from the broad spectrum of choral literature.  Instruction emphasizes healthy choral/vocal techniques, improved note and score reading, and expanded knowledge of musical notation, terminology, and styles.  This course rehearses 150 minutes per week and does not require an audition.

MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr – 1 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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MUSC2124
College Choir (Goal 2 & 6)

This course is a choir that studies and performs works from the broad spectrum of choral literature.  Instruction emphasizes healthy choral/vocal techniques, improved note and score reading, and expanded knowledge of musical notation, terminology, and styles.  This course rehearses 150 minutes per week and does not require an audition.

MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr – 1 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

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PHED1112
Zumba

This course introduces students to a Latin-inspired, dance-fitness class that incorporates International music and dance movements, which create a dynamic, exciting, and effective fitness system. This course combines fast and slow rhythms that tone and sculpt the body in an aerobic/fitness fashion to achieve cardio and muscle-toning benefits. (1cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

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PHED1124
Introduction to Pilates

This course introduces students to the philosophies, principles, and exercises behind Joseph Pilates' mat work. The course will provide students with an introduction to life-long skill for integrating body and mind to create a completely balanced body. This introductory course requires class discussion while participating in basic, active Pilates movements. The activities are basic but require physical effort. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Physical Education/Health

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PHIL1100
Logic (Goal 2 & 4)

This course introduces the student to formal logical reasoning. Students learn how to translate sentences from a natural language into a formal logical language, and use truth-functional logic and natural deduction systems to prove validity. Additionally, students may study syllogistic logic, quantification theory, informal fallacies and/or principles of inductive reasoning pertaining to analogy, enumerative induction, and hypothesis testing. MnTC (Goals 4 M/A and 2C/T); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 4 - Mathematical/Logical Reasoning

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PHIL1110
Introduction to Philosophy (Goal 6 & 9)

This course focuses on the study of classical and modern philosophical developments and provides an introduction to the basic methods and topics of philosophy. Students study the historical dialogue of philosophical arguments in such fields as metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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PHIL1130
Ethics (Goal 6 & 9)

This course introduces the student to fundamental ethical principles developed throughout the history of philosophy through the study of classical and modern writings. Students are encouraged and challenged to apply such principles to contemporary issues. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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PHIL1150
Philosophy of Social Justice (Goal 6 & 9)

This course engages the student in reading and activities intended to explore some of the most fundamental philosophical issues of social justice. Topics include an inquiry into the nature of the state, duties and rights of citizens, and the proper role of the criminal justice system. Philosophical analysis will take place in order to demonstrate the underpinning assumptions and theories behind such issues approaches. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lect)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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PHYS1000
Introduction to Physics (Goal 2 & 3)

This course covers the basic concepts and laws that govern everyday physical phenomena. Topics include mechanics, heat, waves, and electricity. An integral part of the course is the performance of laboratory experiments where students attempt experimental verification of the principles that they learn in the theory class. Prerequisites: High school algebra or equivalent college mathematics. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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PHYS1200
Physics of Optics (Goal 2 & 3)

In this course the basic physics principles related to various optical phenomena are studied. The understanding of the historical development of various optics-related physical theories is emphasized. Also, special importance is given to the understanding of modern optical physics theory and its application to modern optical devices. Integral to the course is the performance of in-class laboratory experiments verifying the optics principles learned. Prerequisite: High school algebra of equivalent college mathematics. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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PHYS1501
College Physics I (Goal 2 & 3)

This first course in college physics emphasizes the understanding of basic physics principles related to mechanics and the application of those principles to the solution of physics-related problems. Laboratory work is an essential part of the course. Prerequisite: High school algebra or equivalent college mathematics. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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PHYS1502
College Physics II (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is a continuation of College Physics I, PHYS 1501. Topics included in this course are momentum and rotational physics, oscillations and waves, thermal physics, electricity, etc. Prerequisite: PHYS 1501. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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PHYS2501
General Physics Lab I (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is designed to be taken concurrently with the General Physics Theory course sequence, and it is strongly recommended that it be taken with the first of those courses. The overall laboratory course sequence is designed to familiarize students with laboratory techniques and instruments used to perform experiments in physics. Students have the opportunity to test and verify some of the basic principles of physics learned in the theory course. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2101. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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PHYS2502
General Physics Lab II (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is designed to be taken concurrently with the General Physics Theory course sequence, and it is strongly recommended that it be taken with the second of those courses. The overall laboratory course sequence is designed to familiarize student with laboratory techniques and instruments used to perform experiments in physics. Students have the opportunity to test and verify some of the basic principles of physics learned in the theory course. This lab is a continuation of PHYS 2501. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2102. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

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PSCI1010
American Government and Politics (Goal 5 & 9)

This course is a study of the United States national government in all of its aspects with special emphasis placed on constitutional theory, major governmental institutions and the national political culture and practice. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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PSCI1020
State and Local Government (Goal 5 & 8)

This course is a study of the principal concepts, process, and institutions of state and local governments of the United States. Special emphasis will be placed on Minnesota government. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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PSCI1030
International Relations (Goal 5 & 8)

This is an introduction to international relationships of the modern world. Special emphasis will be placed on long-term trends and on current international developments. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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PSYC1105
General Psychology (Goal 5 & 7)

This course introduces the student to general topics in psychology and is designed to provide an overview of the field of psychology and human behavior.  Topics include psychology as a behavioral science, the scientific method, biological foundations of behavior, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking, language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, lifespan development, social psychology, stress and coping, and a brief overview of psychological disorders and therapies.

MnTC (Goal 5/SS and Goal 7/HD); (4 Cr – 4 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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PSYC1240
Developmental Psychology (Goal 5 & 9)

This course explores human growth and development from the prenatal through adult life stages, including aging and death.  Students will examine the interaction between genetics and environment on the individual’s physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development.  In addition, family, culture and cohort influences will be explored.

MnTC (Goal 5/SS and Goal 9/EC); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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PSYC2260
Social Psychology (Goal 5 & 9)

This course provides an in-depth and comprehensive discussion of how the social environment influences and is influenced by the individual.  Topics include (but are not limited to) conforming behavior, attitudes, persuasion, self-perception, aggression, prejudice, pro-social behavior, and interpersonal attraction.

MnTC (Goal 5/SS and Goal 9/EC); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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SOCI1101
Introduction to Sociology (Goal 5 & 7)

This course is a survey of the sociological concepts, theories and ideas that have been developed through the scientific study of human interaction. The emphasis of the course is the description and analysis of the nature and characteristics of societies, the structure and processes of social life, the influence of social forces on individuals and groups with an emphasis on cultural diversity and globalism. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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SOCI1103
Social Problems (Goal 5 & 9)

This course focuses on the nature, dimensions, causes, and characteristics of selected social problems in modern society. The sociological perspective and critical thinking will be emphasized in examining theories, research, and programs for the prevention and reduction of social problems. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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SOCI2103
Marriage and Family (Goal 5 & 7)

This course focuses on the social processes and social structures of courtship, marriage, and family. The relationships between society, cultures, family systems, families and individuals will also be examined. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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SOCI2125
Cultural Diversity (Goal 5 & 7)

This course examines the historical framework and the social interactions of racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Gender, sexual orientation, religion and other characteristics that contribute to a culturally diverse society are also described and analyzed in this course. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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SOCI2150
Sexuality and Relationships (Goal 5 & 7)

This course focuses on sexuality and interpersonal relationships. The following topics will be emphasized: healthy sexual attitudes, communicating about sexuality and relationships, decision making, responsibility, values, gender roles, sexual abuse, dealing with changing expectations in relationships and society, differentiating healthy from unhealthy relationships, and forms of intimacy. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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SPAN1001
Beginning Spanish I (Goal 6 & 8)

This course is designed for the beginning-level student with no previous knowledge of Spanish. Course content focuses on developing speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language and Culture (ACTFL) standards. Emphasis is placed on learning useful vocabulary for a variety of everyday situations. Cultural materials develop an awareness and understanding of the arts, customs, history, culture and literature of Spanish-speaking people and countries throughout the world. This study creates a comparison of cultural, social and linguistic differences and similarities. This course also explores how the ideas and values of Spanish-speaking cultures are expressed in the arts and humanities within a social and historical context.MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (4Cr – 4 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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SPAN1002
Beginning Spanish II (Goal 6 & 8)

This course is designed for students who have completed SPAN 1001 or approximately one year of high school Spanish. Course content focuses on developing speaking, listening, read and writing skills in Spanish in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language and Culture (ACTFL) standards. Emphasis is placed on learning useful vocabulary for a variety of everyday situations. Cultural materials develop an awareness and understanding of the arts, customs, history, culture and literature of Spanish-speaking people in countries throughout the world. This study creates a comparison of cultural, social and linguistic differences and similarities. In addition, this course explores how the ideas and values of Spanish-speaking cultures are expressed in the arts and humanities within a social and historical context.MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (4Cr - 4lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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SPAN2001
Intermediate Spanish I (Goal 6 & 8)

This course presents a comprehensive review and continued development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in accordance with the ACTFL (American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language) standards. It includes special emphasis on communicating ideas in conversation and in writing in order to increase proficiency. Cultural materials develop an awareness and understanding of the arts, customs, history, culture and literature of Spanish-speaking people and countries throughout the world. This study creates a comparison of cultural, social and linguistic differences and similarities. This course also explores how the ideas and values of Spanish-speaking cultures are expressed in the arts and humanities within a social and historical context. This course is intended for students who have successfully completed SPAN 1002, or approximately two years of high school Spanish. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (4Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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SPAN2002
Intermediate Spanish II (Goal 6 & 8)

This course is designed for students who have completed SPAN 2001 or approximately three years of high school Spanish. Course content focuses on strengthening speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish in accordance with the American Association of Teachers of Foreign Language (ACTFL) standards. Emphasis is placed on communicating ideas in conversation and composition in order to increase proficiency. Cultural materials develop an awareness and understanding of the arts, customs, history, culture and literature of Spanish-speaking people and countries throughout the world. This study creates a comparison of cultural, social and linguistic differences and similarities. This course also explores how the ideas and values of Spanish-speaking cultures are expressed in the arts and humanities within a social and historical context.MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (4Cr – 4 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 8 - Global Perspective

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SPCH1100
Fundamentals of Speech (Goal 1 & 9)

This course focuses on the theory and practice of public communication including individual and group presentations. This course emphasizes audience analysis, research and organization, speech construction, delivery techniques, and speaking ethics. Students will prepare and deliver a variety of both individual and group presentations. Students should expect to reduce speech apprehension and develop self-confidence in their ability to communicate in public. MnTC (Goals 1/CM and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 1 - Communication, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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SPCH1200
Interpersonal Communication (Goal 1 & 7)

This course focuses on communicating more effectively in personal, social, and professional environments and examining the practical and theoretical aspects of human communication. The course also addresses such topics as self-esteem, listening, effective language, nonverbal communication, assertiveness, leadership, conflict, cultural communication, and computer-mediated communication. Human diversity issues and cultural/intercultural factors and how they affect human communication are examined. MnTC (Goals 1/CM 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 1 - Communication, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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SPCH1310
Communication in a Diverse World (Goal 1 & 7)

This course examines the interconnections between communication and culture. Students will assess the impact of cultural perceptions and how they affect communication behaviors in real contexts and analyze how culture and language impact these behaviors and perceptions. Students  read, observe, discuss, listen, explore, interview, present and react to how culture impacts communication processes. There will be an emphasis on learning communication skills to better enable students to communicate with people from other cultures.
MnTC (Goals 1/C and 7/HD); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 1 - Communication, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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THTR1100
Introduction to Theatre and Film (Goal 6 & 9)

This course will present an overview of theatre as an art, including a brief history of theatre as well as aspects of directing, acting and designing for the stage.  The study of the 20th century art form of film will conclude the semester, focusing on American film and filming techniques from an historical perspective.  Students will have the opportunity to study the influence of film and theatre on American culture through the viewing of specific films and plays. 

MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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THTR1111
Movement for the Stage I

This course will provide performers with the opportunity to study the integration of body and voice in character development. The purpose is to develop and strengthen the body through exercises in relaxation, body alignment, breathing, flexibility, and coordination. Also included are the basics of ballet, jazz, tap, folk, Renaissance and other forms of dance. Students may earn up to 2 credits in the movement sequence. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Physical Education/Health

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THTR2100
Beginning Acting (Goal 6 & 7)

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of acting for stage and camera. The class is designed not only for those wanting to improve stage skills, but also for those wanting to present a confident edge needed whenever appearing before a group, personally or professionally. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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THTR2222
Speech for Performance (Goal 6 & 7)

This skills course emphasizes voice production and voice analysis and improvement, including effective breathing, tone, resonance, articulation and pronunciation using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Students will share with the class selections of prose, poetry, drama and nonfiction demonstrating vocal quality and expression. The analysis of literary selections leads to effective performance choices for voice and body. Students should be aware that there are both academic and performance requirements within the class structure. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts, Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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