Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

One course minimum.  

  Course # Course Name Credits  
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BIOL1020
Current Topics in Biology (Goal 3 & 9)

This course is designed for students who do not plan to major in science. The primary, organizing themes of the course are centered upon learning the basic concepts and theories of life science integrated with issues of current interest and analyzing the current issues from the perspective of ethical and civic responsibility. Biological concepts and theories included in the course are the scientific method, biological molecules, cell biology, evolution, classification, genomics and genetics, ecology and environmental issues, and emerging infectious diseases. Thus the course introduces the concepts of biology and its applications essential to understanding life's parts and processes. Relevant ethical theories will be introduced and applied to the current issues discussed. Due to the nature of the course, the current issues will vary. An overall course objective is to acquaint the student with biologically related current issues that have profound, ethical social, and/or moral implications for each citizen and for our society as a whole. Upon completing the course, the student should have a basic understanding of the issues raised (i.e. basic information about the biology involved), have an ability to critically analyze and discuss the issues, be able to articulate a position on appropriate issues, and support the position. The student will also gain experience in utilizing library and /or Internet research resources. This course also is activity-centered and includes lab-like activities including environmental analysis, case study analysis, biochemical testing for biological molecules, practicing techniques associated with DNA extraction and fingerprinting, microscopic study of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, population projections, cloning DNA, identifying structures and processes of mitosis and meiosis, and additional lab-like activities as appropriate to the topics studied. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

3
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ENGL2251
English Literature (Goal 6 & 9)

This course requires students to read, understand, and appreciate the different periods of English literature. The significant works of major English authors from the time of Chaucer to the present are studied. Authors include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, Pope, Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Yeats, Joyce, Eliot, and Auden. Terminology associated with literary analysis will allow students the insight into the human experience through literature. Critical reading, thinking, and writing skills are emphasized.Previous course work in literature is recommended. MNTC (Goals 6/HU and 9 EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 Lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

3
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PHIL1110
Introduction to Philosophy (Goal 6 & 9)

This course focuses on the study of classical and modern philosophical developments and provides an introduction to the basic methods and topics of philosophy. Students study the historical dialogue of philosophical arguments in such fields as metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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PHIL1130
Ethics (Goal 6 & 9)

This course introduces the student to fundamental ethical principles developed throughout the history of philosophy through the study of classical and modern writings. Students are encouraged and challenged to apply such principles to contemporary issues. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

3
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PHIL1150
Philosophy of Social Justice (Goal 6 & 9)

This course engages the student in reading and activities intended to explore some of the most fundamental philosophical issues of social justice. Topics include an inquiry into the nature of the state, duties and rights of citizens, and the proper role of the criminal justice system. Philosophical analysis will take place in order to demonstrate the underpinning assumptions and theories behind such issues approaches. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lect)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

3
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PSCI1010
American Government and Politics (Goal 5 & 9)

This course is a study of the United States national government in all of its aspects with special emphasis placed on constitutional theory, major governmental institutions and the national political culture and practice. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences

3
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PSCI1015
Honors American Government (Goal 5 & 9)

This honors course is an enriched study of the United States national government in all of its aspects with special emphasis placed on constitutional theory, major governmental institutions and the national political culture and practice.  This course will require students to become involved with their community and to engage in direct political action.  Honors courses emphasize independent inquiry, informed discussion, and direct application within small transformative classes which feature close working relationships with instructors. 

MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences

3
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PSCI1020
State and Local Government (Goal 5 & 8)

This course is a study of the principal concepts, process, and institutions of state and local governments of the United States. Special emphasis will be placed on Minnesota government. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences

3
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PSYC1240
Developmental Psychology (Goal 5 & 9)

This course explores human growth and development from the prenatal through adult life stages, including aging and death.  Students will examine the interaction between genetics and environment on the individual’s physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development.  In addition, family, culture and cohort influences will be explored.

MnTC (Goal 5/SS and Goal 9/EC); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences

3
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PSYC2260
Social Psychology (Goal 5 & 9)

This course provides an in-depth and comprehensive discussion of how the social environment influences and is influenced by the individual.  Topics include (but are not limited to) conforming behavior, attitudes, persuasion, self-perception, aggression, prejudice, pro-social behavior, and interpersonal attraction.

MnTC (Goal 5/SS and Goal 9/EC); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences

3
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SOCI1103
Social Problems (Goal 5 & 9)

This course focuses on the nature, dimensions, causes, and characteristics of selected social problems in modern society. The sociological perspective and critical thinking will be emphasized in examining theories, research, and programs for the prevention and reduction of social problems. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 5 - History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences

3
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SPCH1100
Fundamentals of Speech (Goal 1 & 9)

This course focuses on the theory and practice of public communication including individual and group presentations. This course emphasizes audience analysis, research and organization, speech construction, delivery techniques, and speaking ethics. Students will prepare and deliver a variety of both individual and group presentations. Students should expect to reduce speech apprehension and develop self-confidence in their ability to communicate in public. MnTC (Goals 1/CM and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 1 - Communication

3
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SPCH1110
Honors Fundamental of Speech (Goal 1 & 9)

This honors section of Fundamentals of Speech is an enriched study of the theory and practice of public communication including individual and group presentations.  This course emphasizes audience analysis, research and organization, speech construction, delivery techniques, and speaking ethics.  Students will prepare and deliver a variety of both individual and group presentations.  Students should expect to reduce speech apprehension and develop self-confidence in their ability to communicate in public.  Honors courses emphasize independent inquiry, informed discussion, and direct application within small transformative classes and feature close working relationships with instructors.

MnTC (Goals 1/CM and 9/EC); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 1 - Communication

3
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THTR1100
Introduction to Theatre and Film (Goal 6 & 9)

This course will present an overview of theatre as an art, including a brief history of theatre as well as aspects of directing, acting and designing for the stage.  The study of the 20th century art form of film will conclude the semester, focusing on American film and filming techniques from an historical perspective.  Students will have the opportunity to study the influence of film and theatre on American culture through the viewing of specific films and plays. 

MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

3