Goal 3 - Natural Sciences

A minimum of nine credits, including two courses from two different disciplines.  One course must be a laboratory course.  

  Course # Course Name Credits  
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ASTR1000
Introduction to Astronomy (Goal 2 & 3)

This introductory course in astronomy focuses on the goal of learning the basic principles of astronomy, as well as being able to apply those principles to the study of various objects in our solar system, i.e. the solar planetary system, the sun, comets, asteroids, etc. Building rudimentary telescopes with lenses, studying celestial objects through a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, examination of various astronomical models, etc, provide in-class, lab-like experiences for students of the course. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

3
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BIOL1000
Biological Science (Goal 2 & 3)

This is a one-semester course is designed for students who do not plan to major in science. Emphasis is placed on the major biological principles and their relationship to man and ecology. Topics studied include the scientific method, characteristics of life, biological chemistry, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, classification and ecology. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

3
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BIOL1010
Principles of Environmental Science (Goal 3 & 10)

This course covers general ecological principles related to human impacts on the environment. Environmental problems including population, land use, resources, energy, water pollution, and air pollution will be addressed. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment

3
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BIOL1020
Current Topics in Biology (Goal 3 & 9)

This course is designed for students who do not plan to major in science. The primary, organizing themes of the course are centered upon learning the basic concepts and theories of life science integrated with issues of current interest and analyzing the current issues from the perspective of ethical and civic responsibility. Biological concepts and theories included in the course are the scientific method, biological molecules, cell biology, evolution, classification, genomics and genetics, ecology and environmental issues, and emerging infectious diseases. Thus the course introduces the concepts of biology and its applications essential to understanding life's parts and processes. Relevant ethical theories will be introduced and applied to the current issues discussed. Due to the nature of the course, the current issues will vary. An overall course objective is to acquaint the student with biologically related current issues that have profound, ethical social, and/or moral implications for each citizen and for our society as a whole. Upon completing the course, the student should have a basic understanding of the issues raised (i.e. basic information about the biology involved), have an ability to critically analyze and discuss the issues, be able to articulate a position on appropriate issues, and support the position. The student will also gain experience in utilizing library and /or Internet research resources. This course also is activity-centered and includes lab-like activities including environmental analysis, case study analysis, biochemical testing for biological molecules, practicing techniques associated with DNA extraction and fingerprinting, microscopic study of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, population projections, cloning DNA, identifying structures and processes of mitosis and meiosis, and additional lab-like activities as appropriate to the topics studied. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 9 - Ethical & Civic Responsibility

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BIOL1030
Human Biology (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is an introductory study of human biology. The scientific method, biological molecules, and cell biology will be studied as a foundation to learning human histology (the study of tissues) and organ systems. Each human organ system will be investigated to develop an understanding of its contribution to the human body. Current health and social issues, and other diseases related to human biology, will also be studied. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab) BIOL

3
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BIOL1040
Biology of Women (Goal 3 & 7)

This course is designed to explore aspects of biology that apply specifically to women. The course examines the following areas: genetics of sex determination, male and female reproductive systems, gender development, reproductive biology, intelligence, aging, disease, behavior and evolution as it relates to the biology of women. Issues regarding human diversity will be considered as they arise as well as perceived and actual gender differences between men and women. Upon completing the course, the student should have a basic understanding of the issues raised (i.e. basic information about the biology involved), have an ability to critically analyze and discuss the issues, be able to articulate a position on appropriate issues relevant to the student goals, objectives and outcomes related to human diversity, and support the position. The student will also gain experience in utilizing library and /or Internet research resources. This course also is activity-centered and includes lab-like activities including case study analysis, histology, female and male and anatomy, female and male reproductive issues, identifying structures and processes of mitosis and meiosis, and additional lab-like activities as appropriate to the topics studied. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 7 - Human Diversity

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BIOL1050
Introduction to Forensic Science (Goal 2 & 3)

This introductory course will apply the principles and theories of biology, chemistry, etc. to the study of forensic science. Forensic science is the application of science to those criminal and civil laws that are enforced by police agencies in a criminal justice system. The focus of forensic science is the crime lab using the principles and techniques of biology, chemistry, anthropology and other sciences in order to analyze physical evidence. Topics include an overall orientation to criminalistics including the crime scene, physical evidence, physical properties of glass and soil, organic and inorganic analysis, the use of the microscope, the study of hair, fibers, paints, and drugs, voice and document examination, computer and Internet forensics, forensic technology, forensic serology, the use of DNA as a forensic tool, fingerprints, and firearms, tool marks, and other impressions. This course is activity-based and the student participates in a variety of lab-like experiences demonstrating the principles covered in the course and illuminating how scientific experimentation and research are performed and interpreted. (MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

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BIOL1091
General Biology I (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is the first semester of a two-semester course sequence in general biology. Topics include: the scientific method, characteristics of life, biological chemistry, cell and membrane structure and function, enzymes, metabolism, mitosis, meiosis, genetics, the structure of DNA, and protein synthesis. This course includes laboratory exercises and experimentation that illustrate core principles covered in the course. Prerequisite: CHEM 1101 or 1121 or 1201.

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr – 3 lect, 1 lab)

4
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BIOL1092
General Biology II (Goal 3 & 10)

This course is the second semester of a two-semester course sequence in general biology. Topics include evolutionary biology, a survey of biological diversity, animal structure and function, plant structure and function, and ecology. This course includes laboratory exercises and experimentation that illustrate core principles covered in the course.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 1091. 

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment

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BIOL2020
Human Nutrition (Goal 2 & 3)

This course explores the role of nutrition in promoting, maintaining, and improving the health of the human body. Traditional aspects of nutrition will be studied, as well as emerging issues and nutritional controversies. This course will focus on the science of nutrition, including nutrients and nutritional needs over the lifespan. This course will also cover the application of the principles of nutrition as they relate to individual food choices, health behaviors, public health, wellness, obesity, eating disorders, the use of supplements and botanicals, and the prevention of chronic disease. Issues facing society including food safety and biotechnology will also be discussed. Lab-like activities included in this course are the anatomy and physiology of the human body especiallyas related to digestion and nutrition, histology, case studies, the chemical study and biochemical identification of the biological molecules, vitamins, minerals, and water, a study of foodborne-illness and the microbes responsible, a research study of world population, nutrition and hunger issues, and other activities as appropriate. The final project is tracking self-dietary choices for a month using professional software, and utilizing the analysis to identify patterns, better choices, etc. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

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BIOL2021
Principles of Anatomy and Physiology I (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is the first semester of a two-semester course in human anatomy and physiology. Basic concepts in biology are covered in the first part of the course including the scientific method, biological chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism, cell division, genetics, and DNA structure and function. The second part of the course includes histology and the integumentary system, as well as the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 1101, 1121 or 1201. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

4
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BIOL2022
Principles of Anatomy and Physiology II (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is the second semester of a two-semester course in human anatomy and physiology. Topics include the nervous system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system, the lymphatic and immune system, digestive system, urinary system, and the reproductive system. Acid-base and fluid balances, human embryology and development are also covered. Prerequisite: BIOL 2021. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

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BIOL2040
General Microbiology (Goal 2 & 3)

This introductory course is designed to provide an overview of major concepts in microbiology. Thematic areas to be studied include prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, prokaryotic metabolism (including growth and nutrition), microbial genetics, microbial classification, isolation, and identification, and microbial roles in the disease process, environment and industry.  Laboratory exercises will stress the microscopic study of microorganisms and the application of culturing and identification techniques.  An emphasis will be placed on safe laboratory practice.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 1091 or BIOL 2021.

MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr – 2 lect, 2 lab)

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CHEM1000
Introductory Chemistry (Goal 3 & 10)

This is a laboratory science course for students not intending to major in chemistry or science. Topics include atomic theory, and structure, chemical bonding, chemical accounting (mass and volume relationships), acids and bases, as well as an introduction to organic and biological compounds. MnTC (Goal 3/NS, and 10/PE); (4 Cr 3 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment

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CHEM1121
General, Organic, and Biochemistry (Goal 3 & 10)

This is a laboratory science course covering the principles of general, organic and biological chemistry with emphasis on chemical applications in biological systems. Topics include the scientific method, atomic theory, chemical bonding, organic functional groups, biological chemicals, and metabolic processes. MnTC (Goals 3/NS, 10/PE); (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment

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CHEM1201
General Chemistry I (Goal 3 & 10)

This is the first course of a two semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry, Atomic Theory, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, chemical bonding, molecular structure, and atomic structure, periodicity, and the gas phase.  This course is for students  intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor’s preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing). Prerequisite: Math 1110 or concurrent registration in Math 1110.

MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (5 Cr – 3 lect, 2 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment

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CHEM1202
General Chemistry II (Goal 2 & 3)

This is the second course of a two-semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry. Content includes properties of solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.  This course is for students intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor’s preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing). Prerequisite: MATH 1110 and CHEM 1201.

       MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (5 Cr – 3 lect, 2 lab)

5
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ESCI1000
Earth Science (Goal 3 & 10)

This course covers the development of the earth throughout its history and relates to processes observed today. Special emphasis is placed on the study of volcanoes, earthquakes, geologic structures, and various types of rocks. Also studied in the course is the interdependence between geologic processes and the environment with special emphasis given to how people cope with changing environmental conditions. Hands-on study of various rocks, examination of various geological models, etc, provide in-class, lab-like experience for students of this course. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment

3
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GEOG1211
Honors Physical Geography (Goal 3 & 10)

This honors section of Physical Geography is an enriched study of global physical geography which systematically examines the spatial patterns and interrelationships among physical elements at Earth’s surface. Students study Earth’s physical environment, its systems, and the physical processes that drive them including weather, climate, natural vegetation, soil, and various landforms. Current environmental issues will be discussed and a scientific foundation provided for understanding global warming, geoengineering of weather, and geospatial technologies among others. These topics are not only discussed in groups but also explored in a hands-on manner with in-field exercises and lab-like activities. Honors courses emphasize independent inquiry, informed discussion, and direct application within small transformative classes which feature close working relationships with instructors.

MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 10/PE); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

Also satisfies: Goal 10 - People and the Environment

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PHYS1000
Introduction to Physics (Goal 2 & 3)

This course covers the basic concepts and laws that govern everyday physical phenomena. Topics include mechanics, heat, waves, and electricity. An integral part of the course is the performance of laboratory experiments where students attempt experimental verification of the principles that they learn in the theory class. Prerequisites: High school algebra or equivalent college mathematics. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

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PHYS1200
Physics of Optics (Goal 2 & 3)

In this course the basic physics principles related to various optical phenomena are studied. The understanding of the historical development of various optics-related physical theories is emphasized. Also, special importance is given to the understanding of modern optical physics theory and its application to modern optical devices. Integral to the course is the performance of in-class laboratory experiments verifying the optics principles learned. Prerequisite: High school algebra of equivalent college mathematics. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

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PHYS1501
College Physics I (Goal 2 & 3)

This first course in college physics emphasizes the understanding of basic physics principles related to mechanics and the application of those principles to the solution of physics-related problems. Laboratory work is an essential part of the course. Prerequisite: High school algebra or equivalent college mathematics. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

4
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PHYS1502
College Physics II (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is a continuation of College Physics I, PHYS 1501. Topics included in this course are momentum and rotational physics, oscillations and waves, thermal physics, electricity, etc. Prerequisite: PHYS 1501. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

4
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PHYS2501
General Physics Lab I (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is designed to be taken concurrently with the General Physics Theory course sequence, and it is strongly recommended that it be taken with the first of those courses. The overall laboratory course sequence is designed to familiarize students with laboratory techniques and instruments used to perform experiments in physics. Students have the opportunity to test and verify some of the basic principles of physics learned in the theory course. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2101. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

1
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PHYS2502
General Physics Lab II (Goal 2 & 3)

This course is designed to be taken concurrently with the General Physics Theory course sequence, and it is strongly recommended that it be taken with the second of those courses. The overall laboratory course sequence is designed to familiarize student with laboratory techniques and instruments used to perform experiments in physics. Students have the opportunity to test and verify some of the basic principles of physics learned in the theory course. This lab is a continuation of PHYS 2501. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2102. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

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