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ACCT1001 Business Law (2 Credits)
This course surveys substantive areas of the law that pertain to business and industry. An overview of the legal system and sources of law, contracts, torts, business organizations, ethics, property, agency and employment, negotiable instruments and global issues will be included. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

ACCT1011 Princples of Bookkeeping (2 Credits)
This course introduces the basic bookkeeping cycle. Topics include the analyses of business transactions, recording transactions in a variety of journals, recording payroll, and preparing financial reports. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ACCT1021 Computerized Accounting Applicaions I (3 Credits)
This course covers the use of computers and accounting software as used in the accounting function of the business environment. Topics include general ledger accounting, accounts receivable, accounts payable, inventory, fixed assets, and payroll. Prereq:: BUSO 1620 and ACCT 2011 or equivalents. (3Cr - 2 lect/pres, 1 lab)

ACCT1027 Accounting with Excel and Quickbooks (3 Credits)
This course includes the use of Quickbooks and Microsoft Excel for accounting and related business applications. Topics include use of Quickbooks for general ledger accounting for both service and merchandising businesses. Attention is given to accounting for sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. Quickbooks is used to generate reports as well as exporting to Microsoft Excel. Excel is used for accounting applications such as financial statement analysis, budgeting, loan and bond amortization, and depreciation. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 2011 or concurrent enrollment, basic microcomputer competency or BUSO 1620 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ACCT1028 Accounting Information Systems (3 Credits)
This course includes the use of general ledger and database software as used in the accounting function of the business environment. Topics include general ledger accounting and using database software to maintain tables, queries, forms, and reports for inventory, fixed assets, depreciation, etc. Prerequisites: ACCT 2011 or concurrent enrollment, basic microcomputer competency or BUSO 1620 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ACCT1031 Business Math/Calculators (3 Credits)
This course introduces the application of mathematical functions of business problems and solutions. The touch system of 10-key calculator operations is introduced. Students will also develop speed and accuracy using the touch system for the four basic arithmetic operations and solving business problems. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: MATH 0550 or basic math competency. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ACCT1040 Individual Income Tax (3 Credits)
This course introduces the application of mathematical functions of business problems and solutions. The touch system of 10-key calculator operations is introduced. Students will also develop speed and accuracy using the touch system for the four basic arithmetic operations and solving business problems. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: MATH 0550 or basic math competency. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ACCT1051 Personal Finance (2 Credits)
This course covers all the day-to-day financial transactions faced by all individuals. Prereq: BUSO 1620 or equivalent competency. (2Cr - 2 lect/pres, 0 lab)

ACCT1099 Payroll Accounting (2 Credits)
This course introduces the various state and federal laws pertaining to the computation and payment of salaries and wages. Topics include Fair Labor Standards Act, Federal Insurance Contributions Act, Unemployment Tax Act, withholding laws, preparation of employment records, payroll registers, time cards, employee earnings records, and state and federal reports. Students will perform various payroll calculations and complete a computerized payroll project. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 2011 or concurrent enrollment. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT1120 Business Income Taxation (3 Credits)
This course covers the income taxation of sole proprietorships, corporations, partnerships, fiduciaries, and S corporations. Students complete the appropriate federal tax returns as they apply to these entities. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 1040 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT2011 Principles of Financial Accounting (4 Credits)
This course is an introduction to financial accounting concepts and principles through a study of business transactions and their effect on financial statements. Topics/concepts included are: accounting as an information system; transactions and the accounting cycle; financial statements (including the Income Statement, Statement of Owner¿s Equity, Balance Sheet, and the Cash Flow Statement); analysis of profitability, liquidity, and risk; merchandising operations (including receivables and inventory); long-term assets (including acquisition, depreciation, and disposal); current and long-term liabilities; and equity financing. The course focus will be on corporate accounting. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT2012 Principles of Managerial Accounting (4 Credits)
This course is an introduction to managerial accounting concepts and principles, including a study of: cost behavior; cost-volume-profit analysis; relevant costs for decision-making; budgetary planning; cost management (Activity-Based Costing (ABC), Just-In-Time (JIT), and Total Quality Management (TQM); standard costing and variance analysis; planning for capital investments; product and service costing; performance evaluation; and cost accounting systems. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 2011. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT2022 Computerized Accounting Application II (3 Credits)
A continuation in the use of computers and related software used in the accounting function in business. Topics include installation of an accounting system, manufacturing accounting systems, integrated general ledger accounting, and a computerized accounting simulation. Prereq: ACCT 2021. (3Cr - 2 lect/pres, 1 lab)

ACCT2023 Computerized Accounting Applications III (3 Credits)
This course is a continuation in the use of computers and related software used in the accounting function of the business environment. Topics include installation of an accounting system, integrated general ledger accounting, and computerized accounting simulations. Prereq: ACCT 2022. (3Cr - 2 lect/pres, 1 lab)

ACCT2027 Microcomputer Accounting Applications (3 Credits)
This course includes the use of computers, database and spreadsheet software as used in the accounting function of the business environment. Topics include inventory, fixed assets, and depreciation, loan and bond amortization, and budgeting. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: BUSO 1620 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

ACCT2028 Microcomputer Accounting Systems (3 Credits)
This course includes the use of computers and related software used in the accounting function of the business environment. This course also focuses on the installation and use of two commercial integrated general ledger systems. Topics include installation of an accounting system, integrated general ledger accounting, service, merchandising, and manufacturing accounting systems, sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations, payroll accounting, accounts receivable valuation, inventory valuation, plant assets valuation, notes and bonds payable, financial statement analysis, and computerized accounting simulations. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 2011 or concurrent enrollment, basic microcomputer competency or BUSO 1620 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

ACCT2031 Intermediate Accounting I (4 Credits)
This course is a comprehensive study of accounting theory and concepts with an analysis of the influence on financial accounting by various boards, associations, and governmental agencies. Topics include the income statement, balance sheet, statement of cash flows, time value of money, internal controls, cash, receivables, inventories, and operational assets. The focus of this course is on the practical applications of accounting theory. Students are encouraged to take advantage of available computer software to assist them in computations. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 2011 and ACCT 2012 or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT2032 Intermediate Accounting II (4 Credits)
This course is a continuation of the study of accounting theory and concepts. Topics include investment securities, current liabilities and contingencies, bonds and long-term notes, capital structure, leases, accounting changes and error corrections, and the statement of cash flows. The focus of this course is on the practical applications of advanced aspects of accounting theory. Students are encouraged to take advantage of available computer software to assist in computations. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 2031. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT2034 Cost Accounting I (4 Credits)
This course introduces accounting applied to production costs of a manufacturing entity. Topics include the accounting for materials, labor, and overhead costs. Job order cost system, process cost system, scrap goods, spoiled goods, by-product and joint products, time value of money, strategic financial management, as well as basic budgeting, standard cost systems and variance analysis are also included. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 2011, ACCT 2012, BUSO 1620 or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT2035 Cost Accounting I (3 Credits)
This course covers accounting for production costs of a manufacturing entity. Topics covered include the accounting for materials, labor, and overhead costs. Other topics covered include the job order cost system, process cost system, scrap goods, spoiled goods, by-products and joint products, as well as basic budgeting, standard cost systems and variance analysis. Prereq: ACCT2011, ACCT2012, BUSO1620, or consent of instructor. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT2036 Cost Accounting II (3 Credits)
This course is a continuation of the principles and procedures introduced in Cost Accounting I. Topics include budgeting, standard costing, variance analysis, cost analysis, inventory management, quality cost control, and environmental costing. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 2034. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT2051 Fund/Non-Profit Accounting (2 Credits)
This course covers the application of generally accepted accounting principles for state and local governmental units. Topics include accounting for municipalities, public schools, colleges and universities, and hospitals. Also included is accounting for churches, health and welfare organizations, and other non-profit organizations. Prereq: ACCT 2011 and ACCT 2012. (2Cr - 1 lect/pres, 1 lab)

ACCT2055 Governmental/Fund/Non-Profit Accounting (3 Credits)
This course introduces the application of generally accepted accounting principles for state and local governmental units. Topics include accounting for municipalities, public schools, colleges and universities, and hospitals. Accounting for voluntary health and welfare organizations and other non-profit organizations are also included. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 2011 or concurrent enrollment in ACCT 2011. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT2061 Professional Practice in Accounting, An Accounting Capstone Course (3 Credits)
This course serves as a capstone course for review and integration of the common body of knowledge in the accounting field. In addition to review and integrations, additional topics such as compilations, reviews and audits are included. This course is designed to prepare the student for the Comprehensive Examination for Accreditation in Accountancy, as offered by the Accreditation Council for Accountancy and Taxation (ACAT), an affiliate of the National Society of Public Accountants. By synthesizing various accounting subjects, this course will prepare students for professional practice in an accounting career. The student may choose whether or not to take the accrediting examination. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Accounting degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: ACCT 2031, ACCT 2034 and ACCT 1040 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ACCT2091 Internship (1 Credits)
This course allows the student to practice accounting as well as computer and human relations skills. The student will gain competency in accounting by applying academic accounting knowledge to the requirements of an accounting position. The work site must be approved by the instructor. The student will perform 45 hours of accounting work that is completed under the direct supervision of an accountant and will also be monitored by the instructor. Professional interactions with other personnel and/or customers will be expected. The student and supervisor will submit progress reports and evaluations. Prerequisites: ACCT 2011 and/or instructor approval. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

ACCT2092 Internship (2 Credits)
This course allows the student to practice accounting, as well as computer and human relations skills. The student will gain competency in accounting by applying academic accounting knowledge to the requirements of an accounting position. The work site must be approved by the instructor. The student will perform 90 hours of accounting work that is completed under the direct supervision of an accountant and will also be monitored by the instructor. Professional interactions with other personnel and/or customers will be expected. The student and supervisor will submit progress reports and evaluations. Prerequisites: ACCT 2011 and/or instructor approval. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

ACCT2093 Internship (3 Credits)
This course allows the student to practice accounting as well as computer and human relations skills. The student will gain competency in accounting by applying academic accounting knowledge to the requirements of an accounting position. The work site must be approved by the instructor. The student will perform 135 hours of accounting work that is completed under the direct supervision of an accountant and will also be monitored by the instructor. Professional interactions with other personnel and/or customers will be expected. The student and supervisor will submit progress reports and evaluations. Prerequisites: ACCT 2011 and/or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

ACCT2094 Internship (4 Credits)
This course allows the student to practice accounting as well as computer and human relations skills. The student will gain competency in accounting by applying academic accounting knowledge to the requirements of an accounting position. The work site must be approved by the instructor. The student will perform 180 hours of accounting work that is completed under the direct supervision of an accountant and will also be monitored by the instructor. Professional interactions with other personnel and/or customers will be expected. The student and supervisor will submit progress reports and evaluations. Prerequisites: ACCT 2011 and/or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 0 lect, 4 lab)

ACCT2991 Topics in Accounting (1 Credits)
This course is designed to focus on current issues in accounting. Possible topics include: Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA), contemporary accounting software, or specialized current issues of an accounting nature. Pre-requisites: ACCT2011 Principles of Financial Accounting, equivalent, or consent of the instructor. (1-4Cr lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

ANTH2220 Introduction to Anthropology (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the field of anthropology and its sub-disciplines: cultural anthropology, archaeology, physical/biological anthropology and linguistic anthropology. A major theme of this course is the interaction between human biology, culture and the natural environment. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ANTH2230 Medical Anthroplogy (3 Credits)
This course explores the interaction between health, culture and disease. It focuses on the environmental factors, political and economic influences, and socio-cultural definitions that affect health and illness. Case studies will be used to illustrate the complexity of these relationships in different cultural settings. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ANTH2240 Cultural Anthropology (3 Credits)
This course introduces cultural and social processes that influence human behavior using comparative examples from different cultural groups and historical periods with the goal of better understanding the broad range of human behavioral potentials and those influences that shape the different expressions of these potentials. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ARTS1101 Introduction to Art (3 Credits)
This course is designed for the beginning student who wishes to get a better understanding of the concepts in art. Master works of art of many cultures, past and present, are examined and analyzed allowing the student to develop an art vocabulary, and knowledge of formal elements and principles of design related to specific works of art. Once basic elements and principles are mastered, the student will gain the confidence to examine, understand, and appreciate any work of art, traditional or contemporary. Recommended for art majors. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 studio)

ARTS1102 Art History I (3 Credits)
This course is a survey of historical works of art. Architecture, sculpture, and painting are studied in the context of the periods in which they were produced. Each artistic period is examined in light of social, economic, and cultural significance. This study of artistic expression begins with the earliest attempt at image making and continues through the 15th Century. Recommended for art majors. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 studio)

ARTS1103 Art History II (3 Credits)
This course is a survey of art that will begin with the 14th century and proceed to the present. Architecture, sculpture, and painting are viewed in stylistic classes on the basis of their likeness and the periods in which they were produced. Each artistic period is examined in light of social, economic, and human development within each given era. Completing ARTS 1102 before this course enhances student learning. Recommended for art majors. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 studio)

ARTS1104 Visual Arts Tour (1 Credits)
This course consists of a tour to major art centers for direct experiences with the arts. The goal of this course is to introduce students to major art institutions while expanding and enhancing their appreciation of the arts. A special fee is required for this course. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

ARTS1105 Visual Design Concepts (3 Credits)
This course is an investigation into the creative process and its relationship to the arts. The goal of this course is for the student to gain an understanding of the creative process and how to apply those skills in problem solving. Along with an historical perspective of design, the student will investigate the application of the creative process and its impact within societies. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

ARTS1112 Drawing I (3 Credits)
This course is designed for the beginning drawing student and provides a fundamental experience with drawing materials and tools in the context of drawing practices. Observational drawing will be stressed. Additionally, students will work from imagination, master drawings and photographic sources. Studio problems include exercises in the manipulation, organization, and control of the visual elements and principles of design. This course concludes with a beginning experience in drawing with color media. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1119 Cultural Arts (3 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to artworks found and produced in diverse cultures around the globe. Students will utilize craft media to experience the arts and use a variety of cultural perspectives to develop an appreciation and greater understanding of the cultural diversity existing in the art world. The relationship between the material culture (arts and crafts) and non-material culture (values and beliefs) of a society will be researched and analyzed to develop a sense of aesthetics applied to artworks from diverse cultures. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1122 2 Dimensional Design (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the study of the principles and elements of design. Assignments will focus on the student¿s ability to translate the design concepts into two-dimensional (2-D) works of art. Structured projects enable students to critically explore 2-D design. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1123 3 Dimensional Design (3 Credits)
This foundation course presents the concept of art in three-dimensional (3-D) as seen in a variety of sculptural works that span time and cultures. Exploration of arts and humanities through interaction with a variety of 3-D media in expressing concepts in visual communication will develop an awareness of aesthetics in both process and finished works of art. Formal critiques of art work, personal and others will expand the creative process and develop an appreciation of 3-D design. The study and analysis of the elements and principles of design as they apply to the composition of 3-D art will provide the students with the foundation needed to create these works of art while also experiencing a variety of media to discover their possibilities for expression and communication. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1130 Printmaking I (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to printmaking providing experiences in relief printing, mono-printing and silkscreen techniques. The course develops technical competency to produce an edition of identical prints. The course will encompass past and present processes in a social and artistic context. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1140 Printmaking II (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to printmaking providing experiences in relief lithography and intaglio techniques. The course develops technical competency to produce an edition of identical prints. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1150 Art Portfolio I (1 Credits)
This course will address professional practices in art. It focuses on preliminary description and development of the portfolio. The final product will be the creation, by the student, of his/her own initial portfolio in a range of art media. This course will include an exhibition of work. This final presentation of the portfolio should include a selection of film slides and/or other designated media using current technology such as film slides and digital images. This course is required for Associate in Fine Arts (AFA) students. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

ARTS1222 Ceramics I (3 Credits)
This course explores ceramics from an historical and a global perspective developing an appreciation of ceramic works of art. Arts and humanities are explored through research in the discipline of ceramics and interaction with clay as media. This exploration will develop an awareness of aesthetics in both process and finished works of art. Formal critiques of art work, personal and others, will expand the creative process and develop appreciation for ceramics. This course covers the foundations and fundamentals of creating in clay. Basic hand building and wheel techniques will be introduced through hands-on instruction. The philosophies and processes of working with clay will be experienced from conception through the finished fired state. Techniques will be demonstrated by the instructor to teach the skill involved and to appreciate the possibilities of each. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1226 Painting I (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to fundamentals of acrylic painting, methods and materials. Beginning students will learn how to utilize acrylic painting techniques. This course will allow the student to discover the properties of acrylic paint and how to control consistency, thinning, drying, application, compatibility with other media, types of brushes and supports that will aid the student toward the completion of an art work. After studio problems of acrylic painting techniques are explored, the student will be encouraged to experiment on their own exploring heightened acrylic painting possibilities. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1228 Watercolor Painting (3 Credits)
This course is an exploration of basic watercolor techniques and their application to creative practices in the medium. The students will have the opportunity to develop their own imagination and creativity through watercolor techniques and the exploration of art concepts. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1301 Photography I (3 Credits)
This course is an introductory course covering both the history and application of the discipline. Familiarity with cameras, photographic equipment, film processing, photographic technique and composition will be emphasized. A 35-mm single-lens reflex camera is required. Cameras are available for student checkout and use. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1302 Introduction to Digital Photography (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to digital photography for everyone and includes an overview of both conceptual and historic concerns relevant to digital photographic media, as well as form and design issues including the use of color. The class includes an introduction to digital photographic techniques and the creative use of current editing software in using the computer as a digital darkroom. Students develop proficiency through projects and critiques. Basic knowledge of computers is helpful in this course. A digital camera is required for this course. Digital cameras are available for student checkout. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS1310 Introduction to Digital Art (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to digital media as an art-making tool. This course includes an exploration of painting and drawing programs. Computer techniques for manipulation, layering and incorporation of multiple image sources in a single composition are investigated. Designing for graphic presentation and use of typography is introduced. This course covers a range of options for computer based expression. Course content includes an overview of both conceptual and historic concerns relevant to digital media. Basic knowledge of the computer is helpful. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS2112 Drawing II (3 Credits)
This course is an intermediate-level drawing course. It covers creative methods of expression in specific thematic problems in composition, color, contemporary drawing materials, and self expression. The course includes exposure to drawing practices, both historic and contemporary. Critiques are scheduled that will address each student's artistic discoveries. Prerequisite: ARTS 1112. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS2210 Sociology and the Arts (3 Credits)
This course is an interdisciplinary historical and cross-cultural examination of the relationship between the arts and the culture and social structure of the society in which they are created. The focus will be on the description and analysis of the arts as a reflection of the culture and social structure of the society, the social organizations and subcultures of the art world, as well as the arts as a social agent of change. The goals of the course are for the students to gain a more holistic viewpoint and approach to problem-solving through the integration of the creative processes used by the arts and the social sciences and to apply those skills, knowledge, and viewpoints in their daily lives. (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 studio) MnTC: Goal 6/HU, Goal 8/GP

ARTS2222 Ceramics II (3 Credits)
This course is an advancement of the concepts initiated in Ceramics I allowing the student to expand and focus on either hand-building or wheel techniques. The student will concentrate on exploring and developing techniques in the chosen area while becoming aware of the problem-solving solutions/skills involved in creating at this level. Clay body and glaze foundations will be researched and developed for the finishing process Prerequisites: ARTS 1222. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 studio)

ARTS2223 Intermediate Painting (3 Credits)
This course is a continuation of Painting I. Color theory, along with continued study of conceptual aspects of painting, will be addressed. The student will also develop and pursue personal creative directions in paint along with continued media exploration. Prerequisite: ARTS 1226. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 studio)

ARTS2250 Art Portfolio II (1 Credits)
This course addresses professional practices in art. It focuses on final selection and completion of the art portfolio. This portfolio is the capstone of the Associate in Fine Arts (AFA) degree. The final product will be the creation of a student portfolio including a range of art media. The final presentation will include an artist statement and portfolio of student work. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 studio)

ARTS2297 The Culture in London - London Dash (4 Credits)
London Dash

ASTR1000 Introduction to Astronomy (3 Credits)
This introductory course in astronomy focuses on the goal of learning the basic principles of astronomy, as well as being able to apply those principles to the study of various objects in our solar system, i.e. the solar planetary system, the sun, comets, asteroids, etc. Building rudimentary telescopes with lenses, studying celestial objects through a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, examination of various astronomical models, etc, provide in-class, lab-like experiences for students of the course. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

AUTO1201 Introduction to Automotive (2 Credits)
This course provides the entry-level knowledge and skills needed to work in an automotive repair facility. It covers procedures and safety in the automotive shop, the use of hand tools, power tools, hoist, jacks, and other equipment used by the automotive technician. This course also develops the ability to follow instructions, interpret specifications, and use the hand and power tools required to make various fastener and thread repairs. Minor automotive service and basic shop skills are emphasized. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section I - VIII of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

AUTO1202 Automotive Professional Skills (2 Credits)
This course provides the general knowledge and skills needed for the career of a professional automotive technician. It develops the ability to follow instructions and to interpret and convert measurements and specifications. Professional skills such as computer proficiency, functioning professionalism in work environments, and following diagnostic processes are covered. The writing of repair orders, parts requisitions, and the use of both paper and computer-based repair manuals are included. Correct procedures for general service of vehicles including precision measuring are emphasized. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section I - VIII of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

AUTO1212 Engine Diagnosis (2 Credits)
This course covers engine diagnosis using a compression gauge, oil pressure gauge, vacuum gauge, and other special tools. The focus of the course is to train students to diagnose internal and external problems of engines, such as low oil pressure, low compression, coolant leaks, oil leaks, and vacuum leaks. Engine noise diagnosis and internal part failure analysis is also covered. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section VIII of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation . (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

AUTO1311 Engine Theory and Repair (3 Credits)
This course covers upper and lower engine disassembly and reassembly, parts identification, wear measurements and wear locations. The student will be taught the proper procedure for rebuilding cylinder heads and cylinder block assemblies. The student will learn the theory of operation of a four-cycle internal combustion engine. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section I of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

AUTO1321 Steering and Suspension (3 Credits)
This course covers the theory, diagnosis, and repair of front and rear suspension systems, steering gears, pumps, electronic suspension, and steering controls. The student will also learn wheel balance theory and operation. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section IV of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

AUTO1322 Wheel Alignment (3 Credits)
This course covers the theory of alignment and adjustments used in various front and rear suspension systems to perform a four-wheel alignment. Additionally, the students perform four-wheel alignments. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section IV (D) of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

AUTO1341 Fuel Systems I (3 Credits)
This course covers the theory and principles of operation of the automotive fuel systems including fuel pumps, fuel tanks, filters, fuel injection, and emission control systems. Diagnosis, adjustments, and repair of components are stressed. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section VIII of the National Automotive Technical Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

AUTO1423 Brake Systems (4 Credits)
This course includes basic principles of brakes, hydraulic systems, disc and drum brakes, parking brakes, and power assist units. Emphasis is placed on operation, diagnosis, and repair of various types of brake systems including anti-lock brake systems. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section V of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

AUTO1431 Basic Electrical/Electronics (4 Credits)
This course covers the fundamentals of electricity and electronics, sources of electricity, circuits, magnetism, resistance, coils, capacitance, instruments, diodes, and solid-state devices as they relate to the automotive industry. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section VI of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

AUTO1451 Clutch and Manual Trans/Transaxle (4 Credits)
This course covers standard automotive and light truck clutches, manual transmissions and transaxles. Design, adjustment, and overhaul are included. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section III of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

AUTO2133 Digital Storage Oscilloscope (1 Credits)
This course covers the use of a digital storage oscilloscope, the wave forms that are displayed, the voltmeter mode, the ohmmeter mode, and the ammeter mode. The course also shows the scope user how to set up the scope. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

AUTO2144 Engine Driveability-Ford (1 Credits)
This course helps the student develop skill in diagnosing, testing, and correcting problems related to engine performance. The course concentrates on computer-controlled Ford systems. Prereq: Instructor approval. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

AUTO2145 On Board Diagnostics Two (1 Credits)
This course covers the terms and operation of the second generation of On Board Diagnosis. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

AUTO2155 Automatic Transmission Electronic Controls (1 Credits)
This course covers the theory, operation, and diagnosis of Chrysler, Ford and GM electronic shift transmissions.

AUTO2181 Individual Studies (1 Credits)
This course covers individual studies as identified by the instructor. Prereq: Instructor approval. (1Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 1 other)

AUTO2213 Ignition Systems (2 Credits)
This course develops skills in diagnosing, testing, and correcting problems related to the ignition system. The student will be instructed in the theory and operation of various ignition systems. The student will use an ignition analyzer and a volt-ohm meter to test various components Prerequisites: Instructors approval (2 C/ 1 lect/pres, 1 lab, 0 other)

AUTO2214 Advanced Engine Service (2 Credits)
This course covers cylinder head and block theory and service. Various types of engine rebuilding equipment will be used to service valves, valve seats, pistons, rods, main bearing bores, camshafts, crankshafts, bore and hone cylinders and resurface gasket surfaces. Cylinder head pressure testing will also be covered. Each student will be required to disassemble and recondition an engine. Prerequisites: TAST 1311 & 1212 or DESL 1102 & 1103 & 1104 & 2508 or instructor approval (2 C/ 1 lect/pres, 1 lab, 0 other)

AUTO2215 High Performance Cylinder Heads (2 Credits)
This course covers high performance cylinder head theory and service. Various types of cylinder head service equipment will be used to service valves, valve seats, guides, screw in rocker studs, adjust installed spring height and resurface gasket surfaces. Cylinder head pressure testing, equalizing combustion chamber sizes, increasing/decreasing compression ratios as it relates to the cylinder head, and gasket matching will also be covered. Prerequisites: TAST 2214 or instructor approval. (2 C/ 1 lect/pres, 1 lab, 0 other)

AUTO2216 High Performance Cylinder Blocks (2 Credits)
This course covers high performance cylinder block theory and service. Various types of equipment will be used to bore and hone cylinder bores, main bearing bore inspection, resurface decks, inspect and select pistons, crankshafts and connecting rods. Rotating assemblies are balanced, trial assembly of the rotating assembly to determine if block and cam clearance is required. Engine short blocks are assembled. Prereq: TAST 2314 or instructor approval. (2 Cr - 1 lect/pres, 1 lab, 0 other)

AUTO2217 Engine Balancing (2 Credits)
The student will learn the process to balance connecting rods, pistons, crankshafts, camshafts, dampeners, flex plates/flywheels, and all the other related parts necessary to balance a rotating assembly. Over-balance and under balance techniques are discussed and analyzed as are other common practices. Prerequisites: TAST 2214 or instructor approval. (2CR - 1 lect, 1 lab)

AUTO2218 Cylinder Head Air Flow Research (2 Credits)
The student will learn to measure air flow through cylinder head ports. Porting and polishing, port matching, bowl blending, valve guide height adjustments, valve sizes and designs are compared with regard to air flow. Students will study the results of before and after testing of port flow. Students will research effects of tumble, port size, valve size, and surface conditions of the port. Prerequisites: TAST 2214 or instructor approval. (2Cr - 1 lect/pres, 1 lab, 0 other)

AUTO2219 Advanced High Performance Engine Assembly Techniques (2 Credits)
This course covers Advanced High Performance Engine Assembly. Various techniques will be used to check crankshaft clearances, connecting rod clearance to camshaft, piston to crankshaft clearance, camshaft degreeing, advanced or retarded, roller camshafts, flat tappet camshafts, hydraulic cam lifters, timing components backlash, pushrod length, push rod guide plates, rocker arm ratios, rocker arm geometry, types of rocker arms, rocker studs, piston to cylinder wall clearance dependent on piston type and application. Blueprinting of an engine will be discussed. Each student will be required to assemble an engine. Prerequisites: TAST 2214 & 2215 & 2216 or Instructor approval (2 C/ 1 lect/pres, 1 lab, 0 other)

AUTO2272 Auto Lab (2 Credits)
This course covers auto lab as identified by the instructor. Prereq: instructor approval. (2Cr - 0 lect 2 lab,)

AUTO2315 High Performance Cylinder Heads (3 Credits)
This course covers high performance cylinder head theory and service. Various types of cylinder head service equipment will be used to service valves, valve seats, guides, screw in rocker studs, adjust installed spring height and resurface gasket surfaces. Cylinder head pressure testing, equalizing combustion chamber sizes, increasing/decreasing compression ratios as it relates to the cylinder head, and gasket matching will also be covered. Prerequisites: TAST 2414 or instructor approval. (3 C/ 2 lect/pres, 1 lab, 0 other)

AUTO2352 Rear Axle/Four Wheel Drive (3 Credits)
This course covers the operation and proper repair procedures for final drive, differential, constant velocity (C/V) joint, universal joints, transfer case, front wheel drive hubs in rear wheel drive, front wheel drive, and four wheel drive vehicles. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section III of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: AUTO 1201, AUTO 1202, AUTO 1451, or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

AUTO2373 Auto Lab (3 Credits)
This course covers auto lab as identified by the instructor. Prereq: Instructor approval. (3Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab,)

AUTO2383 Individual Studies (3 Credits)
Individual studies as identified by the instructor. Prereq: Instructor approval. (3Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

AUTO2413 Ignition System Diagnosis (4 Credits)
This course develops skills in diagnosing, testing, and correcting problems related to engine performance. Theory and operation of various ignition systems are included. The students examine an ignition analyzer, digital storage oscilloscopes, and exhaust gas analyzer to perform these functions. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section VIII of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: AUTO 1201, AUTO 1202, and AUTO 1431 or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

AUTO2414 Advanced Engine Service (4 Credits)
This course covers cylinder head and block theory and service. Various types of engine rebuilding equipment will be used to service valves, valve seats, guides, pistons, rods, main bearing bores, camshafts, crankshafts, bore and hone cylinders and resurface gasket surfaces. Cylinder head pressure testing will also be covered. Each student will be required to disassemble, recondition, and reassemble a complete engine. Prerequisites: TAST 1311 & 1212 & 2213 or DESL 1102 & 1103 & 1104 & 2508 (4 CR - 2 lect, 2 lab, 0 other)

AUTO2432 Advanced Electrical/Electronics (3 Credits)
This course covers reading and interpreting wiring diagrams and the operation and servicing techniques as they relate to the repair of exterior lighting, interior lighting, the instrument cluster, cruise control, power operated systems, keyless entry, driver memory settings, body computers, and supplemental restraint systems. Students diagnose computer-operated charging and starting systems. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section III of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: AUTO 1431 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

AUTO2445 Fuel Systems II (4 Credits)
This course covers computer control of fuel injection systems and fuel pressure control. Fuel injector cleaning, testing, and diagnosis are taught in this class. The student is also instructed in turbocharger/supercharger theory and component diagnosis. The student will use a variety of scan tools and a Digital Storage Oscilloscope (DSO) to check various computer inputs and outputs. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section VIII of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: AUTO 1341, AUTO 1431 or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

AUTO2446 Drivability Diagnosis (3 Credits)
This course covers the theory, operation, and testing of the inputs and outputs of automotive computers as they relate to the diagnosis of drivability problems caused by the engine, transmission, or failed exhaust emissions. This course includes the diagnosis of computer-controlled systems that can cause drivability complaints. Various scan tools, a digital multi-meter, an exhaust gas analyzer and a Digital Storage Oscilloscope (DSO) are some of the tools used in diagnosis. Students access the information needed to diagnosis and repair the problem. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section VIII of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: AUTO 1341, AUTO 1431, or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

AUTO2453 Automatic Transmission Theory (4 Credits)
This course covers the hydraulic theory, planetary gear operation, and construction of the automatic transmission. Emphasis is placed on hydraulic diagnosis, planetary gear flow, and external transmission service. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section II of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: AUTO 1201, AUTO 1202, and AUTO 1431. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

AUTO2454 Automatic Transmission Electronics  (4 Credits)
This course covers removal/installation procedures and disassembly/ assembly procedures for automatic transmissions. This course also covers troubleshooting of minor and major components, hydraulic faults, mechanical faults, and electronic control diagnosis. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis of the transmission while it is still in the vehicle. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section II of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: AUTO 1201, AUTO 1202, and AUTO 1431 or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

AUTO2460 Heating & Air Conditioning (4 Credits)
This course includes the use of equipment to reclaim and recharge current model vehicle air conditioning systems. It also covers the principles of air conditioning and heating systems, diagnosis of malfunctions, and testing and repairing of the systems. Theory and operation of automatic temperature control and vacuum controls are reviewed. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section VII of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: AUTO 1431 or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

AUTO2462 Automotive Service Technology Internship (2 Credits)
This course is designed to provide the student a purposeful occupational experience in the automotive career field. A training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site. The advisor coordinates and monitors the progress of the internship. One credit of internships is equal to 48 hours of career-related employment. This internship consists of 96 hours. The student must arrange the internship and the instructor approval. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

AUTO2474 Auto Lab (4 Credits)
This course covers auto lab as identified by the instructor. Prereq: Instructor approval. (4Cr - 0 lect, 4 lab)

AUTO2575 Auto Lab (5 Credits)
This course covers auto lab as identified by the instructor. Prereq: instructor approval. (5Cr - 0 lect, 5 lab)

AUTO2585 Individual Studies (5 Credits)
This course covers individual studies as identified by the instructor. Prereq: instructor approval. (5Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 5 other)

AUTO2676 Auto Lab (6 Credits)
This course covers auto lab as identified by the instructor. Prereq: Instructor approval. (6Cr - 0 lect, 6 lab)

AUTO2686 Individual Studies (6 Credits)
This course covers individual studies as identified by the instructor. Prereq: Instructor approval. (6Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 6 other)

AUTO2777 Auto Lab (7 Credits)
This course covers auto lab as identified by the instructor. Prereq: Instructor approval. (7Cr - 0 lect, 7 lab)

AUTO2787 Individual Studies (7 Credits)
Individual studies as identified by the instructor. Prereq: Instructor approval. (7Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 7 other)

BIOL1000 Biological Science (3 Credits)
This is a one-semester course is designed for students who do not plan to major in science. Emphasis is placed on the major biological principles and their relationship to man and ecology. Topics studied include the scientific method, characteristics of life, biological chemistry, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, classification and ecology. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BIOL1010 Principles of Environmental Science (3 Credits)
This course covers general ecological principles related to human impacts on the environment. Environmental problems including population, land use, resources, energy, water pollution, and air pollution will be addressed. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BIOL1020 Current Topics in Biology (3 Credits)
This course is designed for students who do not plan to major in science. The primary, organizing themes of the course are centered upon learning the basic concepts and theories of life science integrated with issues of current interest and analyzing the current issues from the perspective of ethical and civic responsibility. Biological concepts and theories included in the course are the scientific method, biological molecules, cell biology, evolution, classification, genomics and genetics, ecology and environmental issues, and emerging infectious diseases. Thus the course introduces the concepts of biology and its applications essential to understanding life's parts and processes. Relevant ethical theories will be introduced and applied to the current issues discussed. Due to the nature of the course, the current issues will vary. An overall course objective is to acquaint the student with biologically related current issues that have profound, ethical social, and/or moral implications for each citizen and for our society as a whole. Upon completing the course, the student should have a basic understanding of the issues raised (i.e. basic information about the biology involved), have an ability to critically analyze and discuss the issues, be able to articulate a position on appropriate issues, and support the position. The student will also gain experience in utilizing library and /or Internet research resources. This course also is activity-centered and includes lab-like activities including environmental analysis, case study analysis, biochemical testing for biological molecules, practicing techniques associated with DNA extraction and fingerprinting, microscopic study of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, population projections, cloning DNA, identifying structures and processes of mitosis and meiosis, and additional lab-like activities as appropriate to the topics studied. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BIOL1030 Human Biology (3 Credits)
This course is an introductory study of human biology. The scientific method, biological molecules, and cell biology will be studied as a foundation to learning human histology (the study of tissues) and organ systems. Each human organ system will be investigated to develop an understanding of its contribution to the human body. Current health and social issues, and other diseases related to human biology, will also be studied. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BIOL1040 Biology of Women (3 Credits)
This course is designed to explore aspects of biology that apply specifically to women. The course examines the following areas: genetics of sex determination, male and female reproductive systems, gender development, reproductive biology, intelligence, aging, disease, behavior and evolution as it relates to the biology of women. Issues regarding human diversity will be considered as they arise as well as perceived and actual gender differences between men and women. Upon completing the course, the student should have a basic understanding of the issues raised (i.e. basic information about the biology involved), have an ability to critically analyze and discuss the issues, be able to articulate a position on appropriate issues relevant to the student goals, objectives and outcomes related to human diversity, and support the position. The student will also gain experience in utilizing library and /or Internet research resources. This course also is activity-centered and includes lab-like activities including case study analysis, histology, female and male and anatomy, female and male reproductive issues, identifying structures and processes of mitosis and meiosis, and additional lab-like activities as appropriate to the topics studied. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BIOL1050 Introduction to Forensic Science (3 Credits)
This introductory course will apply the principles and theories of biology, chemistry, etc. to the study of forensic science. Forensic science is the application of science to those criminal and civil laws that are enforced by police agencies in a criminal justice system. The focus of forensic science is the crime lab using the principles and techniques of biology, chemistry, anthropology and other sciences in order to analyze physical evidence. Topics include an overall orientation to criminalistics including the crime scene, physical evidence, physical properties of glass and soil, organic and inorganic analysis, the use of the microscope, the study of hair, fibers, paints, and drugs, voice and document examination, computer and Internet forensics, forensic technology, forensic serology, the use of DNA as a forensic tool, fingerprints, and firearms, tool marks, and other impressions. This course is activity-based and the student participates in a variety of lab-like experiences demonstrating the principles covered in the course and illuminating how scientific experimentation and research are performed and interpreted. (MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BIOL1060 Microbes and Society (3 Credits)
This course is primarily intended for non-science majors. The major, organizing themes of the course are centered upon learning the basic concepts and theories of life science, with major emphasis placed on gaining an understanding of the microbial world, and how microbes impact humans and their environment. Topics of study will include a survey of microorganisms, an examination of the human microbiome, the microbial role in industry, food production and biotechnology, bioterrorism and the local and global threat of infectious disease. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10 PE) (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

BIOL1091 General Biology I (4 Credits)
This course is the first semester of a two-semester course sequence in general biology. Topics include: the scientific method, characteristics of life, biological chemistry, cell and membrane structure and function, enzymes, metabolism, mitosis, meiosis, genetics, the structure of DNA, and protein synthesis. This course includes laboratory exercises and experimentation that illustrate core principles covered in the course. Prerequisite: CHEM 1000, 1101, 1121 or 1201. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

BIOL1092 General Biology II (4 Credits)
This course is the second semester of a two-semester course sequence in general biology. Topics include evolutionary biology, a survey of biological diversity, animal structure and function, plant structure and function, and ecology. This course includes laboratory exercises and experimentation that illustrate core principles covered in the course. Prerequisite: BIOL 1091. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

BIOL2020 Human Nutrition (3 Credits)
This course explores the role of nutrition in promoting, maintaining, and improving the health of the human body. Traditional aspects of nutrition will be studied, as well as emerging issues and nutritional controversies. This course will focus on the science of nutrition, including nutrients and nutritional needs over the lifespan. This course will also cover the application of the principles of nutrition as they relate to individual food choices, health behaviors, public health, wellness, obesity, eating disorders, the use of supplements and botanicals, and the prevention of chronic disease. Issues facing society including food safety and biotechnology will also be discussed. Lab-like activities included in this course are the anatomy and physiology of the human body especiallyas related to digestion and nutrition, histology, case studies, the chemical study and biochemical identification of the biological molecules, vitamins, minerals, and water, a study of foodborne-illness and the microbes responsible, a research study of world population, nutrition and hunger issues, and other activities as appropriate. The final project is tracking self-dietary choices for a month using professional software, and utilizing the analysis to identify patterns, better choices, etc. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BIOL2021 Principles of Anatomy and Physiology I (4 Credits)
This course is the first semester of a two-semester course in human anatomy and physiology. Basic concepts in biology are covered in the first part of the course including the scientific method, biological chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism, cell division, genetics, and DNA structure and function. The second part of the course includes histology and the integumentary system, as well as the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 1101, 1121 or 1201. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

BIOL2022 Principles of Anatomy and Physiology II (4 Credits)
This course is the second semester of a two-semester course in human anatomy and physiology. Topics include the nervous system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system, the lymphatic and immune system, digestive system, urinary system, and the reproductive system. Acid-base and fluid balances, human embryology and development are also covered. Prerequisite: BIOL 2021. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

BIOL2040 General Microbiology (4 Credits)
This introductory course is designed to provide an overview of major concepts in microbiology. Thematic areas to be studied include prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, prokaryotic metabolism (including growth and nutrition), microbial genetics, microbial classification, isolation, and identification, and microbial roles in the disease process, environment and industry. Laboratory exercises will stress the microscopic study of microorganism and the application of culture and identification techniques. An emphasis will be placed on safe laboratory practice. Prerequisites: BIOL 1091 or BIOL 2021. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

BIOL2050 Pathophysiology (3 Credits)
This course provides an in-depth study into the chemical, biological, physiological and psychological processes occurring when the normal adaptive processes that maintain human health change. This course will use systemic and non-systemic approaches to study alterations in health. The nature, cause, diagnosis and treatment of common disease conditions will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL 2022. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BIOT1000 Introduction to BioTechnology (3 Credits)
This course will provide students an overview of the field of biotechnology. This course will first focus on the basic theories of biological science, then relate them to the biotechnological discoveries and techniques that are being used in the medical field to diagnose, treat and prevent diseases and health problems. It will also explore the employment opportunities in the biotechnology and bioscience job markets. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA1000 Computer for Composition (1 Credits)
This course introduces the laptop computer in the academic setting. Students have exposure to an intranet; course management software; and word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software via Microsoft Office. The Internet is covered for electronic communications and research. Windows is addressed as an operating system. Keyboarding skill promotes success in this course. Prerequisites: LAPT 1100 and Laptop Orientation. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA1001 Intro Laptop Computer (1 Credits)
This course introduces the laptop computer in the academic setting. Students have exposure to an intranet; course management software; and word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software via Microsoft Office. The Internet is covered for electronic communications and research. Windows is addressed as an operating system. Keyboarding skill promotes success in this course. Prerequisites: LAPT 1100 and Laptop Orientation. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA1002 Introduction to Online Learning (1 Credits)
This course provides students with an orientation to the online learning environment, online learning strategies, and communication and technology features. Students will be required to demonstrate competency in accessing course materials, completing assignments, communicating with classmates and faculty, researching via the Internet, accessing online resources, and working with multimedia files. Specific technology topics include computer and software (operating system and application) requirements, uploads/downloads, plug-ins, Internet access and browsers, and course management software. To successfully complete this course, students should have basic computer skills such as document creation using application software, creating and sending e-mails, accessing the Internet, and using operating systems. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA1010 Introduction to Business (3 Credits)
This course provides an overall picture of contemporary business operations in a global world. Topics covered include forms of business organization; small businesses, entrepreneurships, and franchises; fundamentals of management and marketing; organizational and team structures; accounting and finance concepts; human resource management; legal and regulatory guidelines, social and ethical responsibilities; and careers in business. The course is designed to help students realize the integral role business plays in the economy and our lifestyles. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA1050 Personal Financial Management and Planning (3 Credits)
This course introduces and emphasizes the importance of personal financial management and planning and provides solid strategies for successful financial management. Topics covered include key factors that affect personal income; budgets; cash-flow management; credit and credit cards; borrowing; managing taxes; and major expenditures including housing, automobiles, insurance and investments. Students will prepare their own financial plan. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA1065 Microcomputer Applications (3 Credits)
This course provides a basic understanding of computer history, concepts, and microcomputer applications using IBM or compatible microcomputers. Topics covered will include computer hardware and software, operating systems and utilities, the system unit, input and output devices, secondary storage, communications and connectivity, the Internet and the Web, security and privacy, ethics, and computer use in organizations. Through hands-on experience, students will acquire an understanding of Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, database applications, presentation applications, and graphics that are used in business. No prior knowledge of software packages or microcomputers is necessary. Keyboarding skill promotes success in this course. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab

BUSA2032 Business Law - Legal Environment (3 Credits)
This is a survey course about the legal aspects of business. It includes a review of the basic United States legal system, ethics, contracts, legal structure of business, agency and employment law, property issues, and international/global business law. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA2041 Business Communications (3 Credits)
This course is designed to assist business students in developing professional written and oral communication skills. Course content includes a review of English fundamentals in grammar, business correspondence, and communication fundamentals. Topics include writing effective letters of request, response, sales, credit and collections, claims and adjustments; electronic communications; business memos; business reports; and applications and résumés. Quality, appearance, style, and tone are stressed along with correct format and proper use of punctuation and grammar. Individual and group oral reports on business topics will be assigned. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA2042 Principles of Management (3 Credits)
This course consists of a systematic study of basic management processes including planning, organizing, leading and controlling within an organizational setting. It examines the historical and philosophical foundations of management as well as current theory and practices. Topics include operation management, decision-making, ethics and corporate responsibility, planning resource management, labor relations, workgroups, leadership, organizational design and development, strategic management, international management, cultural diversity, and technology. Effective management principles are examined. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA2043 Principles of Marketing (3 Credits)
This course covers basic marketing functions in the global business world. Topics include product development, pricing, distribution, and promotion; consumer behavior; economic, legal, social, technological and competitive environments of marketing; collecting and using marketing information; ethical and social responsibilities; and international marketing. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA2050 Introduction to Management Information System (3 Credits)
This course provides students with a range of knowledge about computer-based systems in organizations and how information is used to satisfy business needs. The goal of the course is to help students learn how to use and manage information and information systems to revitalize business processes, improve managerial decision making and problem solving, and gain competitive advantage. Students will gain a basic understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operation. Emphasis is placed on the role of Internet, intranets, extranets, and other information technologies. Students will work with software applications to do ¿what if¿ analysis. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisite: BUSA 1065 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA2065 Introduction to International Business (3 Credits)
This course is an overview of international business and the environmental forces that impact international business. Topics covered include economic, cultural, legal and political environments in global business and international business functions including management, marketing, finance, and exporting and importing. The course also discusses professional business practices, ethics, cultural behavior, etiquette and social responsibility. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSA2102 Business Internship (2 Credits)
This is a capstone course for students completing a Business (BUSA) major. The internship includes practical, on-the-job experiences in a business or organization environment under executive supervision. The student has the opportunity to apply the principles and knowledge learned in Business classes in a real work environment. The student will perform 96 hours of internship experience. Internship sites must be approved by the program advisor. The student and internship site supervisor will submit progress reports and evaluation to program advisor. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: Program advisor permission, 2.5 cumulative grade point average, and two-thirds of the required Business program major credits completed. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

BUSA2103 Business Internship (3 Credits)
This is a capstone course for students completing a Business (BUSA) major. The internship includes practical, on-the-job experiences in a business or organization environment under executive supervision. The student has the opportunity to apply the principles and knowledge learned in Business classes in a real work environment. The student will perform 144 hours of internship experience. Internship sites must be approved by the program advisor. The student and internship site supervisor will submit progress reports and evaluation to program advisor. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: Program advisor permission, 2.5 cumulative grade point average, and two-thirds of the required Business program major credits completed. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

BUSA2104 Business Internship (4 Credits)
This is a capstone course for students completing a Business (BUSA) major. The internship includes practical, on-the-job experiences in a business or organization environment under executive supervision. The student has the opportunity to apply the principles and knowledge learned in Business classes in a real work environment. The student will perform 192 hours of internship experience. Internship sites must be approved by the program advisor. The student and internship site supervisor will submit progress reports and evaluation to program advisor. This course is part of the Associate in Arts Business Emphasis and Associate in Science Business degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: Program advisor permission, 2.5 cumulative grade point average, and two-thirds of the required Business program major credits completed. (4 Cr - 0 lect, 4 lab)

BUSO1604 Keyboarding I (3 Credits)
In this course the alpha, numeric, symbol, and function keys are reviewed emphasizing the touch method. Keyboarding fundamentals and techniques are taught including: basic formatting, proofreading skills, straight-copy skill development, and correct keyboarding posture and technique. Prerequisites: 30 words per minute (wpm) at 97% accuracy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO1607 Keyboarding Basics (1 Credits)
This course introduces alpha, numeric, and symbol along with basic keyboarding fundamentals and techniques. Emphasis will also be placed on building speed and accuracy. Typing technique and posture concepts will be introduced. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO1608 Proofreading (1 Credits)
This course covers proofreading and editing techniques. Students will use proofreading and editing techniques to produce correct, clear, concise, and complete copy. Prerequisite: BUSO 1625. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO1616 Keyboarding II (3 Credits)
This course further develops keyboarding skills using correct keyboarding posture and technique with a strong emphasis on speed, accuracy, and proofreading. Advanced formatting and production of various business documents utilizing word processing software will be included. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant and Medical Administrative Assistant degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisite: 40 words per minute (wpm) at 97% accuracy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO1620 Introduction to Computer (2 Credits)
This course covers basic information about computer hardware and the use of computer software as a business productivity tool, as well as for personal use. Topics covered include the operating system and desktop environment; file and folder management; introduction to spreadsheet procedures; introduction to database creation and file management, fundamental word processing concepts, and presentation graphics. Some basic computer literacy will be covered, such as e-mail etiquette, ethical computing, document attachment to e-mail and use of digital files. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant and Medical Administrative Assistant degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO1621 Keyboarding Skillbuilding I (1 Credits)
This course emphasizes keyboarding speed and accuracy through goal setting, individual improvement, error analysis, and intensive corrective practice. Basic keyboarding techniques are strengthened in this course emphasizing and improving speed and accuracy. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO1623 Integrated Office Skills  (3 Credits)
This course integrates and reinforces skills and knowledge from previous business and office courses. Through the use of simulations and in-basket projects, students will experience daily routines, prepare and format documents, make decisions, set priorities, handle work pressure, and become aware of work quality and quantity requirements while utilizing a variety of software applications. Project emphasis is on developing an awareness of workflow and the chain of command. Prerequisite: BUSO 1620 and BUSO 1630. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO1625 Business Communication I (3 Credits)
This course is designed to provide an in depth study of business English skills through review and use of many practice applications of grammar usage, punctuation, capitalization, numbers, abbreviations, spelling improvement, writing skills, editing skills, and business vocabulary skills development. The business world demands that its participants communicate effectively both verbally and nonverbally. No business person can communicate effectively without knowledge of the basic rules of grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Emphasis is placed on using the Gregg Reference Manual and other reference resources for developing proofreading and editing skills. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant and Medical Administrative Assistant degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: GSCM 1510 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO1630 Office Procedures (3 Credits)
This course introduces students to typical office tasks including mail classifying, coordinating meeting and travel arrangements, inventorying office supplies, telephone and calendaring procedures, and the importance of correct ergonomics. Emphasis will be on setting priorities and practicing time management skills. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO1647 Word Processing (Wordperfect) (3 Credits)
This course utilizes Corel WordPerfect software to perform document preparation applications. Topics include document creation, editing, use of hidden/reveal codes; storage and retrieval; character, line and page formatting; cut/copy/ move text; find and replace; creation and execution of macros; keyboard merging; templates; inserting graphics; columns, sorting, file management; outline styles; tables and indexing; footnotes/endnotes; creating and suppressing headers/footers. Accurate proofreading is emphasized. Keyboarding skills promote success in this course. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO1648 Word Processing (Word) (3 Credits)
This course utilizes Microsoft Word software perform information processing applications. Topics include document creation, editing, storage, and retrieval; preparation of common business documents such as memos, letters, envelopes, and reports; character, line and page formatting; cutting, copying, and moving text; finding and replacing text; creating and executing macros; creating and utilizing templates; inserting graphics; utilizing columns; creating tables; sorting and selecting specific text; utilizing styles; utilizing speller, thesaurus, and grammar checking; and effective file management and maintenance. Accurate proofreading is emphasized. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant and Medical Administrative Assistant degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Co-requisite: Keyboarding I or typing skills. Keyboarding skills promote success in this course. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO1650 Business Communications II (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes composing, writing, and editing of a variety of business communications such as letters, memos, and reports. Students will continue to develop spelling, grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and vocabulary skills. This course also examines the development of oral communication skills required in a business/office environment. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: BUSO 1625 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO1651 Current Office Technologies (3 Credits)
This course introduces the student to current technologies and tasks that increase work quality and productivity in changing office environments. Topics include voice recognition, digital transcription, cloud computing (including securing information), editing pdf files, and accessing information through the Internet. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Pre/co-requisite: BUSO 1620, or instructor's approval. BUSA 1002 may also be helpful with or before this course. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO1655 Customer Relationship Management (3 Credits)
This course is designed to focus on the importance of customer service and client information management for office professionals. Focus will be given to tools, techniques, and applications to assist in identifying potential clients and opportunities for service improvement while managing and inputting client data. Topics include problem-solving, promoting a positive service culture, projecting a professional image, communicating with customers, handling complaints, and working with culturally-diverse clients. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Pre/co-requisite: BUSO 1620, or instructor's approval. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO1660 Anatomy & Physiology/Disease Conditions (3 Credits)
This course presents an introduction to human anatomy and physiology by body systems. Diseases common to each body system will also be studied. Emphasis is placed on terminology - symptomatic, diagnostic, and operative terms. Medical abbreviations are introduced. Study of diseases by anatomical systems is covered. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Medical Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO1663 Medical Office Procedures (3 Credits)
This course introduces a variety of medical office career information, medical ethics, and professional liability. Topics include medical receptionist tasks, working with patient files, medical records and billing, and medical insurance. Medical office procedures pertaining to receptionist tasks and patient medical record management will be studied. This course will also cover the integration of several office tasks: meeting and travel arrangements, patient scheduling, telephone messages, mail handling, etc. Filing techniques and rules are also studied. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Medical Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO1664 Medical Account Management (3 Credits)
This course is a continuation of Medical Office Procedures. The course reviews career options, office skills, medico-legal issues, and patient confidentiality. Medical accounts management pertains to patient billing, medical insurance including procedural and diagnostic codes, and office management. These functions will be studied as they pertain to the medical office. A medical software package is used to complete simulated patient billing, including an understanding of governmental and private third-party payers. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Medical Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: BUSO 1663 and BUSO 1668. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO1666 Medical Transcription I (3 Credits)
This course introduces medical transcription skills using dictation from all medical specialties. A variety of medical transcription experiences is provided with special emphasis on medical report formatting and medical letter style, in addition to basic grammar rule review. This course covers punctuation, capitalization, and abbreviation rules as they apply to medical documents. Medical homonyms, eponyms, antonyms, and plurals are studied. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Medical Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: BUSO 1668. Prior to or concurrently: BUSO 1670 or with instructor approval. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

BUSO1667 Medical Transcription II (3 Credits)
This course is a continuation of Medical Transcription I. Transcription of dictated medical material into a variety of usable medical documents is covered. Emphasis will be on authentic forms and material, building speed, accuracy, and advanced proofreading and editing skills. The study of medical terminology, medical abbreviations, and prescription drugs is continued. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Medical Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: BUSO1666. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

BUSO1668 Medical Terminology (2 Credits)
This course introduces the building of medical words including prefixes, suffixes, combining forms from Greek and Latin word parts, and the rules for connecting them to form medical terms. Definition and spelling of word roots, prefixes, and suffixes is emphasized. Emphasis is placed on spelling and defining medical words. A foundation is created for the continued development of medical vocabulary. This course presents 600 component medical word parts and their use in building and interpreting medical terminology related to each body system. Medical abbreviations are also presented for each medical specialty. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Medical Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO1670 Applied Medical Terminology (2 Credits)
This course presents in-depth usage of component medical word parts in the description of disease conditions, signs and symptoms, and diagnostic and operative procedures. Pharmaceutical terminology including brand/trade and generic drug names along with their classifications and use will be covered. This information will come from the Physician's Desk Reference (PDR), the Internet, and other reference materials. Additional topics covered will be characteristics of typical drugs and use of the PDR in location, correct spelling, and proper interpretation of medications in dictated material. Medical abbreviations and formation of foreign plurals will also be studied. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Medical Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: BUSO1668 and BUSO1660. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO1679 Essentials of Business Law (2 Credits)
This course provides an introductory overview of legal rights and a broad, practical approach to the study of business law. A survey of subjects include: criminal law, tort law, property law, landlord-tenant law, computer law, ethics, professionals' liability, and personal law. Internet sites are used to access for research of issues for discussion. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO1690 Business Math Concepts (2 Credits)
This course covers application of mathematical functions to the solution of business problems. Topics covered include: banking and payroll, commissions, trade and cash discounts, markup, interest and credit. A brief review of fractions and decimals is provided. Students requiring more than a brief review of these operations should consider enrollment in a developmental math class. Prereq: Appropriate math scores (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

BUSO2606 Office Calculators/Math (1 Credits)
This course covers development of the touch system on the numeric keyboard calculators and microcomputer keyboards. Students will develop speed and accuracy using the touch system for the four basic arithmetic operations as well as applying math functions to the solution of business and consumer problems. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant and Medical Administrative Assistant degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO2609 Windows (2 Credits)
This course provides both the fundamental and advanced skills necessary to use Windows. Students explore real-world examples of procedures that will prepare them to be skilled users of PC operating systems. Maintenance of fixed disk drives and auxiliary storage is covered including file maintenance, directory structure, creation and removal of files and directories/folders. Prereq: BUSO1620. (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

BUSO2611 Internship (1 Credits)
The Business and Office Technology internship is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the administrative support career field. A training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site. The advisor coordinates and monitors the progress of the internship. One credit of internship is equal to 48 hours. This course requires 48 hours of career-related employment. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO2612 Internship (2 Credits)
The Business and Office Technology internship is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the administrative support career field. A training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site. The advisor coordinates and monitors the progress of the internship. One credit of internship is equal to 48 hours. This course requires 96 hours of career-related employment. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

BUSO2613 Internship (3 Credits)
The Business and Office Technology internship is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the administrative support career field. A training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site. The advisor coordinates and monitors the progress of the internship. One credit of internship is equal to 48 hours. This course requires 144 hours of career-related employment. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Medical Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

BUSO2614 Internship (4 Credits)
The Business and Office Technology internship is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the administrative support career field. A training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site. The advisor coordinates and monitors the progress of the internship. One credit of internship is equal to 48 hours. This course requires 192 hours of career-related employment. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (4 Cr - 0 lect, 4 lab)

BUSO2622 Keyboarding Skillbuilding II (1 Credits)
This course will further emphasize keyboarding speed and accuracy through personal goal setting, error analysis, individual improvement, and intensive corrective practice. Basic keyboarding techniques are strengthened in this course emphasizing improvement in speed and accuracy. Prerequisites: BUSO 1621. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO2631 Applied Medical Coding (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to medical classification systems using Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. Coding is the transformation of verbal descriptions into numbers. This course will build basic knowledge of both coding systems. The course will cover the differences in coding for inpatients versus outpatients with a component of long-term care reimbursement; and the differences between procedure codes and diagnostic codes. A current CPT coding manual and an ICD-9-CM manual is used. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Medical Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: BUSO 1662 and BUSO 1668. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO2633 Database Concepts/Applications (2 Credits)
This course provides students an in-depth understanding of database design; creating a database; querying a database; maintaining a database; importing an Excel worksheet into an Access database; creating reports and forms, publishing reports to the Web; enhancing forms by using OLE fields, hyperlinks and subforms; and using macros, VBA and the Switchboard Manager to create an application system. Keyboarding skill promotes success in this course. Prereq: BUSO 1620 or BUSO 1610. (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

BUSO2634 Database Concepts and Applications (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes concepts and theories which underlie database management systems. Topics include designing a database structure, data entry, editing, arranging, and retrieval along with report and query creation and generation. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisite: BUSO 1500 or computer skills. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO2637 Spreadsheet Cpts/Apps (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes business concepts and applications using microcomputer spreadsheet software. Topics include entering labels, values, formulae, and functions; moving, copying formatting, saving, and retrieving spreadsheet data; manipulating databases using delete, insert, sort, and extract functions; printing large and small spreadsheets; publishing spreadsheets on the Web; macros; and graphing. Keyboarding skills support success in this course. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisite: BUSO 1620 or computer experience. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO2641 Applied Principles of Bookkeeping (3 Credits)
This beginning level course introduces the basic bookkeeping cycle. Topics include transaction analysis and recording. The full range of journals, financial reports, and current bookkeeping applications, such as QuickBooks, will be used. BUSO 2606 may also be helpful with or before to this course. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO2644 Office Supervision and Management (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes administrative office management skills, theories, methods, and techniques of supervision are emphasized. It also profiles real-world managers who offer globalization, organizational environments, diversity, leadership, human resource management, work ethics, practical information about human relations, goal setting, productivity, budgets, team building, motivation, delegation, appraisal, office technology, and working in management. Simulated office management experiences, projects, role playing, and case studies are included. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant and Medical Administrative Assistant degrees which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

BUSO2645 Records Management (2 Credits)
The procedures for managing documents/ records are covered. Basic manual systems concepts are covered, and the concepts needed for understanding computerized records storage and retrieval methods are introduced. Principles and practices of manual and computerized record systems are emphasized. Practical applications are addressed as to professional at managerial, supervisory, and operating levels. (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

BUSO2651 Advanced Word Processing (3 Credits)
Microsoft Word software is utilized to perform advanced information processing applications. Topics include: macros, table manipulation options; outlines, styles, templates and wizards; graphics, mail merge, document sharing and comparing, and web pages. Accurate proofreading is emphasized. Prereq: BUSO1648 Word Processing (Word). (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO2652 Advanced Spreadsheets (3 Credits)
Microsoft Excel software is utilized to perform advanced spreadsheet applications. Topics include: Developing and Changing the Appearance of a Worksheet, formulas and Advanced Printing, Graphics, Linking and Consolidating Worksheets. Accurate proofreading is emphasized. Prerequisite: BUSO 2 637 Spreadsheet Concepts/Applications 3 credits (3 lec)

BUSO2653 Advanced Microsoft Enhancements (3 Credits)
Microsoft 2000 software is utilized to perform applications. Topics include: Outlook messages; address books; calendars; message attachments, prioritization, appointment schedules, PalmPilot capabilities, data transfer, PalmPilot calendar, phonebook, to-do list, memo pad, and email; expense tracking; paging and faxing. Prerequisite: BUSO1620 Intro to Computer 3 credits (2/1)

BUSO2658 Medical Secretary Internship (2 Credits)
This course is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the medical secretary field. Each internship is individualized. A training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site to provide experience related to the skills and knowledge acquired in the program. One credit equals to 48 hours of on-the-job internship experience. (1-4 credits) Prereq: Advisor Approval. (1-4Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 1-4 OJT)

BUSO2670 Medical Transcription III (3 Credits)
This course is a continuation of Medical Transcription II. Emphasis will be on building speed and accuracy in transcription and advanced proofreading and editing skills with utilization of medical references. Additionally, transcription of non-native doctor dictation is completed. Prerequisites: BUSO 1666 and BUSO 1667. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

BUSO2689 Multimedia Business Presentations (3 Credits)
This course addresses preparation of graphics for visualization and presentation by various means: overheads, document camera, outlines, and computer-generated software graphics. Students will utilize software input devices and printing techniques to create software presentations using basic-advanced techniques in programs such as PowerPoint. Public speaking skills are also introduced as students understand essential presentation elements and creating and presenting effective business presentations. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisite: BUSO 1620. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO2691 Digital Publications (3 Credits)
This course introduces basic concepts, terminology, techniques, design elements, and applications of desktop publishing are introduced. A variety of desktop publications including brochures, flyers, newsletters, business cards, calendars, and letters are created. Design elements of basic web-pages are also introduced and practiced. Word processing and graphics files are integrated to produce professional-quality publications. Prerequisite: BUSO 1620, or instructor's approval. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

BUSO2692 Productivity and Project Management (3 Credits)
This course is designed to reinforce and build on time management principles learned in other program courses through introduction and application of additional productivity management tools. The focus begins with individual productivity management and transitions to identifying, proposing, planning, and implementing a successful project. Relevant project management tools such as work breakdown structure, critical path method (CPM), Gantt charts, and current project management software will be utilized. Focus will be given to communicating and working within project teams using a variety of communication methods while participating in project simulations. This course is part of the Associate in Applied Science Administrative Assistant degree which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). Prerequisites: BUSO 1620 and 1630, or instructor's approval. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

CARE1000 Integrative Career Planning (1 Credits)
This course is designed to assist students in determining educational and career direction through an examination of theory, values and preferences, interests, skills, career planning techniques (such as goal setting and decision-making) and utilization of occupational information. Recommended for students who are undecided about their college major. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

CARE1100 College Success Strategies (1 Credits)
This course is designed to assist students with hands-on exercises and techniques to improve study skills and aid in successful completion of college level courses. This course will assist students in navigating the terrain of higher education, to improve their academic performance, to help them determine their strengths and goals and to encourage them to implement strategies to enhance their personal, academic and career success. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

CARE1200 Freshman Experience (1 Credits)
This course is designed to strengthen the beginning college student's understanding and use of college resources and services leading to the greater likelihood for academic success and stronger relationships within the college community. This course will assist students to improve their academic performance, help determine their goals, encourage them to implement strategies to enhance their personal, academic and career success, and to actively participate in their educational experience. Topics will include registration, Counseling Services, Student Success Center Services, Financial Aid Services, basic technology skills and library skills. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

CARE1300 Student Success Strategies (2 Credits)
This course is designed to assist students with hands-on exercises and techniques to improve study skills and ability to access and utilize resources to aid in successful completion of college level courses. Topics will include registration, counseling services, Student Success Center services, financial aid services, basic technology skills and library skills. This course will also assist students to improve their academic performance, to help them determine their strengths and goals, to encourage them to implement strategies to enhance their personal, academic and career success. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CARE1400 Portfolio Development (1 Credits)
This course guides the student in the process of developing a portfolio to document the competencies achieved through various experiences such as education, work, specialized certification programs, training programs, personal experience and inquiry. The participant is introduced to portfolio components such as brief life history, a statement of goals, a description of experience and related learning that is matched to competencies aligned with corresponding goals within Riverland Community College courses. The student learns how to document and support components of a portfolio. Primary focus of this course will be to gain understanding of the distinction between their experiences and their competencies. Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 0960 or appropriate placement score. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

CARP1110 Construction Material and Tool Safety (3 Credits)
This course prepares the student to safely use power and hand tools in the construction trades. The study of construction materials and fastening procedures are covered. A series of required hand and power tool projects are completed in the carpentry lab. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CARP1111 Construction Materials & Tool Safety (4 Credits)
This course covers the uses of power and hand woodworking tools correctly and safely. It will also cover construction materials used in construction as well as types of material and fasteners. It will also cover the process of following building codes. (4Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP1120 Building Principles I (4 Credits)
This course introduces building layout, surveying, concrete theory, placement, and finish. The student examines several uses of concrete in residential construction. A concrete slab and/or concrete footing are poured and finished during the concrete portion of this course. Basic principles of residential framing are covered. The student studies types of residential framing and frames floor along with walls of a 10' by 12' shed within the framing unit. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP1130 Building Principles II (3 Credits)
This course addresses how to properly install exterior wall components, roof framing, and roof coverings. The student installs sheathing, siding, and completes a gable roof structure for a 10' by 12' shed. Different types of materials and procedures for each process are covered. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

CARP1140 Cabinet Making I (4 Credits)
This course introduces cabinet woods, hardware, and design of basic cabinets. Students draft and construct a cabinet making project. Students operate cabinet power tools during the construction and assembly process. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP1210 Blueprint Reading and Drawing (3 Credits)
This course introduces basic blueprint reading, estimating, and computer-aided design and drafting (C.A.D.D.) for residential construction. Students study and read a series of residential construction working drawings. The student identifies different prints used in building a residential home and draws a small residential home on a C.A.D.D. program. Hand drafting and estimating of a 24' by 24' garage are also completed. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CARP1211 Blueprint Reading & Drawing (4 Credits)
This course will cover basic blueprint reading and will cover dimension drawing, scales, and dimensioning. Students will also get an introduction to C.A.D. (4Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP1220 Cabinet Making II (4 Credits)
This course is designed for advanced cabinet making. The student draws working drawings and constructs and assembles a set of kitchen cabinets to be used in a residential home. All concepts are used as a guide to further improve skills. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP1230 Building Principles III (4 Credits)
This course emphasizes the basic concepts of interior finish in residential construction. The focus is on hanging, taping, and finishing of interior drywall, hanging and trimming interior doors and locksets, basic layout of floor tile and hardwood floors, cutting and installing baseboard and casing for doors and windows. Students complete the finishing steps of a small residential home. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP1240 Building Principles IV (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes hand framing of a gable and hip roof. Students study layout and assembly of different roof slopes. The layout and assembly of a small set of stairs are covered. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

CARP2110 Construction Site Work (4 Credits)
This course examines the layout of a house on a lot. Students work with setting elevations and oversee the excavation. Students work on concrete flatwork and observe the foundation walls constructed by a subcontractor. Each student demonstrates forming and finishing procedures of concrete on footing, floors, and driveways. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1230 and CARP 1240. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP2120 Residential Framing Techniques (4 Credits)
This course emphasizes various methods of floor and wall framing. Different types of materials and methods used in framing are examined. Students participate in various methods of the framing process. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1230 and CARP 1240. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP2130 Roof Construction (3 Credits)
This course introduces the erection of trusses and hand framing of rafters. Correct methods of shingling, flashing, and proper ventilation are included. This course places emphasis on installation of trusses, rafters, sheathing, soffit, facia, shingles, flashing, and all ventilation materials necessary for completion of the residential house project. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1120. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CARP2140 Exterior Construction (4 Credits)
This course introduces the installation of all exterior doors and windows. Application of siding and soffit on a residential home are included. This course places emphasis on window identification, placement, and installation techniques. Installation of various hardware and door hanging procedures are demonstrated on a residential house project. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisite: CARP 1230 and CARP 1240. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP2210 Interior Wall Finishes (4 Credits)
This course introduces the preparation and installation of drywall and finishing techniques. Textures and painting are included. Students measure, mark, cut, and install drywall on ceilings and walls and apply finish surfaces on the residential house project. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1230. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP2220 Millwork Installation and Finishing (4 Credits)
This course introduces the installation of interior doors, window trim, and stair railing. Staining and varnishing of millwork are included. The installation of finished wood floors or tile floors is introduced depending on class project. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1230. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP2230 Cabinet Installation (3 Credits)
This course introduces the installation of kitchen cabinets, vanities, and other built-ins. Installing tops with the finish fit and caulk are included. The final building inspection will be done on the current building project. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CARP2231 Cabinet/Counter Installaion (4 Credits)
This course will cover the installation of cabinets along with countertops. It will also have the final building inspection. (4Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CARP2250 Internship (2 Credits)
This course allows students to get into the field and explore the trade first hand. (2Cr - 2 OJT)

CARP2251 Internship with Service Learning Option (2 Credits)
This course enables students to work independently on skill improvement in a generalized area of the carpentry trade. Application of competencies gained from previous work experiences and/or coursework is emphasized. This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in an additional service learning option. The instructor and student identify specific tasks to be accomplished by the student and develop an individualized training plan. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

CARP2261 Skill Building Lab (1 Credits)
This course enables students to work independently on skill improvement in a generalized area of the carpentry trade. Application of competencies gained from previous work experiences and/or coursework is emphasized. The instructor and student identify tasks to be accomplished and develop an individualized training plan. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

CARP2262 Skill Building Lab (2 Credits)
This course enables students to work independently on skill improvement in a generalized area of the carpentry trade. Application of competencies gained from previous work experiences and/or coursework is emphasized. The instructor and student identify tasks to be accomplished and develop an individualized training plan. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

CARP2263 Skill Building Lab (3 Credits)
This course enables students to work independently on skill improvement in a generalized area of the carpentry trade. Application of competencies gained from previous work experiences and/or coursework is emphasized. The instructor and student identify tasks to be accomplished and develop an individualized training plan. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

CARP2271 Skill Building Lab (1 Credits)
This course enables students to work independently on skill improvement in a generalized area of the carpentry trade. Application of competencies gained from previous work experiences and/or coursework is emphasized. The instructor and student identify tasks to be accomplished and develop an individualized training plan. This course is part of the Carpentry program which is accredited by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Prerequisites: CARP 1110. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

CARP2275 Carpentry and Cabinet Making Internship (4 Credits)
This course provides the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the cabinet making field. A training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site. The advisor coordinates and monitors the progress of the internship. One credit of internship is equal to 48 hours of career-related employment. The student must arrange his/her own internship. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1-4 Cr - 0 lect, 1-4 lab)

CHEM1000 Introductory Chemistry (4 Credits)
This is a laboratory science course for students not intending to major in chemistry or science. Topics include atomic theory, and structure, chemical bonding, chemical accounting (mass and volume relationships), acids and bases, as well as an introduction to organic and biological compounds. MnTC (Goal 3/NS, and 10/PE); (4 Cr – 3 lect, 1 lab)

CHEM1121 General, Organic, and Biochemistry (3 Credits)
This is a laboratory science course covering the principles of general, organic and biological chemistry with emphasis on chemical applications in biological systems. Topics include the scientific method, atomic theory, chemical bonding, organic functional groups, biological chemicals, and metabolic processes. MnTC (Goals 3/NS, 10/PE); (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

CHEM1201 General Chemistry I (4 Credits)
This is the first course of a two semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry, Atomic Theory, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, chemical bonding, molecular structure, and atomic structure, periodicity, and the gas phase. This course is for students intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor’s preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing). Prerequisite: Math 1110 or concurrent registration in Math 1110. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 10/PE); (4 Cr – 3 lect, 1 lab)

CHEM1202 General Chemistry II (4 Credits)
This is the second course of a two-semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry. Content includes an introduction to organic chemistry, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. This course is for students intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor's preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing). Prerequisite: MATH 1110 and CHEM 1201. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

CHIN1001 Beginning Chinese I (4 Credits)
This course will be an integrated and comprehensive introduction to Mandarin Chinese as a foreign language. Emphasis will be placed on all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The Chinese language also has an extremely long and rich tradition in literature. To gain a sense of the richness of this tradition, students will read a number of short illustrative examples (some in English translation). The course will incorporate a variety of teaching materials and methods which will help the student to master the fundamentals of the language and provide a solid foundation for further course work or self study. (4Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

CMAE1502 Technical Mathematics (3 Credits)
This is an introductory technical math course. The course is designed both for students who have basic math skills and for those who need a review of basic technical math concepts. The primary goal of this course is to help individuals acquire a solid foundation in the basic skills of math/shop algebra and geometry. This course will show how these skills can model and solve authentic real-world problems. This is a blended on-line course utilizing Tooling "U", Desire to Learn (D2L) and proctored unit exams. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1506 Introduction to Computers (2 Credits)
This course is designed to provide a learning experience using critical thinking and problem solving approach. Students will develop the software concepts and practical skills they need to succeed beyond the classroom. Core learning activities will encompass the Microsoft Office suite. Specific software applications featured in this class include Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. Additional software based skill development include email/netmail, Desire to Learn (D2L), Smart Thinking, Computer Security and E-folio. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

CMAE1510 Print Reading (2 Credits)
This course will orient the student to the basic skills and abilities required for understanding prints as utilized in a manufacturing/industrial environment. Emphasis will be placed upon the interpretation of lines and symbols, multi-view drawing (including orthographic projection, isometric and perspective drawings, title blocks, revision systems, dimensioning and tolerance symbols and principles.) Additional knowledge and skill development will include applications of math/geometry in relation to mechanical print reading, interpretation of basic weld symbols, and basic shop sketching. Students will apply the knowledge acquired through a variety of in-class activities and external assignments. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1514 Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC) Safety (2 Credits)
This course is designed to align with the MSSC assessment and certification system for safety. This course delivers the 30-hour Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 501-mandated standard. Preparation for taking and passing the MSSC-Certified Production Technician (CPT) certification assessment will be emphasized. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1518 Manufacturing Processes (2 Credits)
This course develops the basic knowledge necessary to understand and apply industry defined standards in manufacturing processes and production needed by entry level production employees. Preparation for, and completion of, the Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC)-Certified Production Technician (CPT) certification assessment will be emphasized. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1522 Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC) Quality (2 Credits)
This course provides the student with the basic knowledge necessary to understand and apply quality concepts that have been identified by the MSSC Assessment and certification system for Quality Practices. Students will be introduced to a quality management system and its components. Preparation for taking and passing the MSSC Certified Production Technician (CPT) certification assessment will be emphasized.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1526 Maintenance Awareness (2 Credits)
The Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC) Maintenance Awareness course introduces the concepts of Total Productive Maintenance and Preventative Maintenance. This course is designed to align with the MSSC assessment and certification system for Maintenance Awareness. Preparation for, and completion of, the MSSC-Certified Production Technician (CPT) certification assessment will be emphasized. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1530 Degree Machining Math (2 Credits)
This is a math course designed for students in a machine shop environment. The primary goals of this course are to help individuals acquire a solid foundation in the basic skills of math that relate directly to the machine shop and industrial manufacturing. This course will show how these skills can model and solve authentic real-world problems. This is a blended on-line course utilizing Tooling U, Desire to Learn (D2L) and proctored unit exams. Pre-requisite: CMAE 1502 (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1532 Machine Tool Print Reading (2 Credits)
This course covers the principles of mechanical print reading. Course includes sketching, lines, dimensioning and tolerancing, and single/multi-view drawings. Co-requisite: CMAE 1510. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1534 Machine Tool Technology Theory (2 Credits)
This course will address the machining theory related to the safety and operation of basic machine tools. This is a blended on-line course utilizing Tooling-U and Desire to Learn (D2L). (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1540 Introduction to CNC (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to Computer Numeric Control (CNC) Machining. The focus will center on CNC machining centers and will include the history of CNC machining, G & M codes, programming, set up and operating procedures. Co-requisite: CMAE 1536. (3cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1542 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (2 Credits)
Students will engage in learning how to read prints with Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing applications. Each of the geometric controls will be examined so the student may determine the allowable variation in form and size between part features. The Y14.5 M standard will be used. Using precision equipment, geometric controls will be inspected to print specification. Co-requisite: CMAE 1532 (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1550 DC Circuits (3 Credits)
This course covers the basic principals in DC electric circuits. The use and understanding of test equipment for circuit analysis is stressed. Co-requisite: Technical Math or equivalent course. (3cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

CMAE1552 AC Circuits (3 Credits)
This course covers investigation of alternating current and its behavior in resistive, inductive and reactive series, parallel, and series/parallel circuits; use of test instrumentation; electromagnetic induction. (3cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

CMAE1554 Digital Electronics (3 Credits)
This is the first course in Digital Electronics. Students will acquire a fundamental knowledge of digital electronics, Boolean algebra, digital devices, analog to digital conversion and digital to analog conversion and how to apply knowledge and skills through problem solving, simulation and practical projects. Co-requisite: Technical Math or the equivalent. (3cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CMAE1556 Analog Circuits (3 Credits)
This course covers diodes, power supplies, transistor operation, biasing and specifications as well as amplifier configuration and applications. (3cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CMAE1558 Motor Control (3 Credits)
This course introduces the learner to motor control components and provides them with a basic knowledge of control circuitry. The learner will build on his/her experiences from Basic Electricity by designing, building and troubleshooting more complex circuits. Devices such as contactors, motor-starters, relays, timers, mechanical, and proximity switches are used. Electronic motor controls and programmable devices such as variable frequency drives are introduced in this course. Pre-requisite: AC Circuits or equivalent. (3cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

CMAE1560 Interpreting Symbols (2 Credits)
The Welding profession requires a good working knowledge of the fundamental component of welding prints that make up structures in the welding industry. To accurately layout and fabricate parts, the welder will need basic knowledge of print lines, dimensions, notes, and welding symbols. The students will breakdown welding prints to develop the skills necessary to fabricate individual component parts that will make-up welded structures. Written and Fundamental tests will be administered in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) and the appropriate correlating code books. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CMAE1562 Oxyfuel Welding and Cutting Process (3 Credits)
This course covers the use of oxy-fuel equipment while welding, cutting, brazing, and using the Plasma Arc Cutting (PAC) and Air Carbon Arc Cutting (CAC-A) processes. There will also be in introduction into laser cutting equipment. A very important part of this course will be discussing safety as it relates to the thermal welding and cutting equipment. Time will be spent in the lab developing skills using the thermal welding and cutting processes. Welds will be made in the flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead positions. Cuts will be made in the flat and horizontal positions. Written and fundamental tests will be done in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) codes and standards. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CMAE1564 Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) (3 Credits)
Students will study the safety concerns connected with the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process, along with an introduction into the types of power sources used for arc welding, process applications, electrode selections, overview of weld types and other work-related safety conditions in the welding field. Time will be spent in the lab developing skills using the SMAW processes. Welds will be made in the flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead positions. Written and fundamental tests will be done in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) codes and standards. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CMAE1566 Gas Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)/Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) (3 Credits)
Students will study the safety concerns associated with the Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and Flux Cord Arc Weld (FCAW). The GMAW process will be discussed in depth in relationship to the different types of modes of transfer available, shielding gases, and the different types of materials that can be welded. Differences in the electrode types of gas-shielded wires and self-shielded wires will be discussed along with the types of shielding gases that are used. There will be discussions on the importance of how the welding process intersects with the arc welding symbols and codes. Students will review procedures used in the visual inspections of welds. Time will be spent in the lab developing skills used in the GMAW and FCAW processes. Welds will be made in the flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead positions. Written and fundamental tests will be done in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) codes and standards. Pre-requisite: CMAE 1524 (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CMAE1568 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) (3 Credits)
This course covers the safety hazards and applications for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) in the welding industry. Students will learn about power sources, setup, types of current, current selection, shielding gases and torch types. Various procedures will be discussed for welding different metals (aluminum, stainless steel and mild steel) and potential problems that may be encountered. Applications for the process in different industries, and the use of back purging and its application will also be discussed. Welds will be made in the flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead positions. Written and fundamental tests will be done in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) codes and standards. Pre-requisites: CMAE 1520, CMAE 1524, CMAE 1526 (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CMAE1570 Metallurgy and Mechanical Properties of Materials (1 Credits)
This course covers the study of metals and how the effects of welding and heat treatments affect them. Terminology dealing with metallurgy will be in important part of the course. Physical and mechanical properties of ferrous and nonferrous metals will be covered along with the classifications of the different types of metals. By understanding the mechanical properties of metals, students will gain an understanding of the range of usefulness of the materials in the metal working community. Written tests will be done in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) codes and standards. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

COSM1100 Cosmetology Basic Practices (3 Credits)
This course introduces basic chemistry as it relates to the molecular structure of hair, skin, and cosmetic lotions, soaps and shampoos. Further focus is on basic anatomy and microbiology to understand the functions of body cells and tissues as they relate to cosmetology. Students develop salon product knowledge, including salon ethics, sanitation, and duties. Along with salon ethics and duties, students develop salon product knowledge. The use of rinses, conditioners, and safety precautions are also included. Minnesota statutes and rules governing cosmetology practices are also studied. (3 Cr - l lect, 2 lab)

COSM1105 Introduction to Hair Design (3 Credits)
This course introduces the practice of basic hairstyling techniques including fingerwaving, sculpture curls, and roller placement as well as blow drying and iron curling. Hairshaping implements, cutting terminology, techniques, safety, and sanitation are studied. Students develop skills in cutting elevations for various designs and shapes. Students gain experience by working on mannequins, clients, and classmates. Performance quotas must be met in compliance with Minnesota statutes and rules. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in COSM 1100. (3 Cr - l lect, 2 lab)

COSM1110 Manicuring Techniques (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes the care of the hands, nails, and feet. Nail shapes and the use of manicure and pedicure equipment and supplies, as well as basic manicure and pedicure procedures are introduced. Students apply artificial nails and conduct nail repair. Instruction and clinical practice are provided in sculpturing techniques, nail tip application, overlays, and nail fills. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in COSM 1100. (3 Cr - l lect, 2 lab)

COSM1115 Chemical Procedures (4 Credits)
This course introduces basic permanent wave techniques including blocking, wrapping, and processing. Students study the effects of acid and alkaline waves and chemical compositions of solutions. Students conduct pH comparisons and calculate the costs involved in chemical procedures. Texture, elasticity, and porosity of hair are studied. Chemical hair relaxing, curl rearrangers, and techniques for recurling straightened hair are addressed as well as advanced techniques involving permanent waving, chemical relaxing and restructuring and the effects and techniques of relaxing and recurling products. Prerequisites: COSM 1100, COSM 1105, and COSM 1110. (4 Cr - l lect, 3 lab)

COSM1120 Clinical I (6 Credits)
This practical application course includes specific client services. Under instructor supervision, students provide services including shampooing, conditioning, cutting, styling, manicuring, and pedicuring to mannequins, classmates, and clients. Students develop skills in hairstyling, hairshaping, and chemical procedures. Salon safety and sanitation are stressed. Students experience salon reception and dispensary service work. Statutes and rules covering salon services are included in this course. Required preclinical testing is provided and satisfactorily completed quotas accumulate to meet quota requirements. Prerequisites: COSM 1100, COSM 1105, COSM 1110, and COSM 1115. (6 Cr - 0 lect, 6 lab)

COSM1125 Hair Coloring Techniques (5 Credits)
This course introduces theory of hair tinting, color rinses, and bleaching. Various hair lightening, toning, and special effects techniques are studied. Emphasis is placed on the use of aniline derivative tints, temporary and semi-permanent color rinses. Prerequisites: COSM 1100, COSM 1105, COSM 1110, and COSM 1115. (5 Cr - 2 lect, 3 lab)

COSM1130 Skin Care (5 Credits)
This course includes facial massage, skin care, make-up selection and application. Eyebrow arching, false eyelash application, light therapy and hair removal techniques are also studied. Safety and sanitation are an important focus of the course. Prerequisites: COSM 1120. (5C r - 2 lect, 3 lab)

COSM1135 Licensing Preparation (3 Credits)
This course focuses on completion of quotas. Students review Minnesota statutes and rules in preparation for the required skill readiness test and salon experience. Anatomy and physiology relevant to cosmetology are also reviewed. Prerequisites: COSM 1100, COSM 1105, COSM 1110, COSM 1115, COSM 1125, and COSM 1130. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

COSM1140 Clinical II (6 Credits)
This course focuses on hair, skin, and nail care and provides an opportunity to perfect skills previously studied. Satisfactorily completed quotas accumulate to meet quota requirements. Students complete required skill readiness testing which includes shampooing, stress reliever, haircut, fingerwave, pincurl, rollerset, comb out, chemical relaxer, permanent wave, and manicure. Students perform client services and work with other students. Prerequisite: COSM 1120. (6 Cr - 0 lect, 6 lab)

COSM1145 Skill Certification (3 Credits)
This course provides the students the opportunity to complete the skill certification testing necessary for cosmetology licensing in the State of Minnesota. Topics included shampooing, stress reliever, haircut, fingerwave, pincurl, roller set, comb out, haircolor, permanent wave, and manicure. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

COSM1150 Clinical III (3 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity to complete the Minnesota state-required quotas necessary to perform skill certification. Students perform services on clients, other students, and mannequins. These services accumulate to meet quota completion and minimum hourly requirements for Minnesota licensure. Prerequisites: COSM 1100, COSM 1105, COSM 1110, COSM 1115, and COSM 1125. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

COSM1160 Clinical IV (10 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity to complete the Minnesota state-required quotas necessary to perform skill certification. Students perform services on clients, other students, and mannequins. These services accumulate to meet quota completion and minimum hourly requirements for Minnesota licensure. Prerequisites: COSM 1100, COSM 1105, and COSM 1110. (2 Cr – 2 lect, 0 lab)

COSM1162 Clinical V (2 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity to complete the Minnesota state-required quotas necessary to perform skill certification. Students perform services on clients, other students, and mannequins. These services accumulate to meet quota completion and minimum hourly requirements for Minnesota licensure. Prerequisites: COSM 1100, COSM 1105, and COSM 1110. (2 Cr – 0 lect, 2 lab)

COSM1164 Clinical VI (2 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity to complete the Minnesota state-required quotas necessary to perform skill certification. Students perform services on clients, other students, and mannequins. These services accumulate to meet quota completion and minimum hourly requirements for Minnesota licensure. Prerequisites: COSM 1100, COSM 1105, and COSM 1110. (2 Cr – 0 lect, 2 lab)

COSM1166 Clinical VII (2 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity to complete the Minnesota state-required quotas necessary to perform skill certification. Students perform services on clients, other students, and mannequins. These services accumulate to meet quota completion and minimum hourly requirements for Minnesota licensure. Prerequisites: COSM 1100, COSM 1105, and COSM 1110. (2 Cr – 0 lect, 2 lab)

COSM1168 Clinical VIII (2 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity to complete the Minnesota state-required quotas necessary to perform skill certification. Students perform services on clients, other students, and mannequins. These services accumulate to meet quota completion and minimum hourly requirements for Minnesota licensure. Prerequisites: COSM 1100, COSM 1105, COSM 1110, 1115 and 1125. (2 Cr – 0 lect, 2 lab)

COSM1180 Iowa Licensure Preparation (18 Credits)
This course provides the student the 550 (345 theory and 205 procedures) additional hours and educational requirements to satisfy the Iowa Professional Licensure guidelines. Students acquire additional theory and practical experience by performing cosmetology services on mannequins, fellow students, and clients. Students study Iowa and federal laws, rules, and standards, Universal Precautions, and complete additional hour requirements for the Core Life Sciences, Cosmetology Theory, and Applied Practical Instruction. Prerequisites: Completion of coursework satisfying Minnesota cosmetologist licensure requirements or equivalent course work. (18 Cr - l lect, 17 lab)

COSM2101 Clinical IX (1 Credits)
This clinical course provides students the opportunity to obtain the required 1550 minimum hours by the State of Minnesota to complete the Cosmetology program and become licensed in the State of Minnesota. Each clinical credit equals 48 hours. Students continue to accumulate quotas acquired from services performed on clients, other students, and mannequins. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required Cosmetology courses. (1 Cr – 0 lect, 1 lab)

COSM2102 Clinical IX (2 Credits)
This clinical course provides students the opportunity to obtain the required 1550 minimum hours by the State of Minnesota to complete the Cosmetology program and become licensed in the State of Minnesota. Each clinical credit equals 48 hours. Students continue to accumulate quotas acquired from services performed on clients, other students, and mannequins. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required Cosmetology courses. (2 Cr – 0 lect, 2 lab)

COSM2103 Clinical IX (3 Credits)
This clinical course provides students the opportunity to obtain the required 1550 minimum hours by the State of Minnesota to complete the Cosmetology program and become licensed in the State of Minnesota. Each clinical credit equals 48 hours. Students continue to accumulate quotas acquired from services performed on clients, other students, and mannequins. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required Cosmetology courses. (3 Cr – 0 lect, 3 lab)

COSM2104 Clinical IX (4 Credits)
This clinical course provides students the opportunity to obtain the required 1550 minimum hours by the State of Minnesota to complete the Cosmetology program and become licensed in the State of Minnesota. Each clinical credit equals 48 hours. Students continue to accumulate quotas acquired from services performed on clients, other students, and mannequins. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required Cosmetology courses. (4 Cr – 0 lect, 4 lab)

COSM2105 Clinical IX (5 Credits)
This clinical course provides students the opportunity to obtain the required 1550 minimum hours by the State of Minnesota to complete the Cosmetology program and become licensed in the State of Minnesota. Each clinical credit equals 48 hours. Students continue to accumulate quotas acquired from services performed on clients, other students, and mannequins. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required Cosmetology courses. (5 Cr – 0 lect, 5 lab)

CPRO1000 Computer Maintenance & Repair (A+) (3 Credits)
This course enables students to develop skills required to become a proficient personal computer (PC) support technician. The course guides students through the installation, maintenance, troubleshooting and upgrading, and repairing of PC's. Other topics included in the course are system boards, floppy drives, essentials devices, hard drive installations and support, troubleshooting fundamentals, power supplies, and diagnostic software. Students build a personal computer. This course prepares students for CompTIA A+ certification. Prerequisites: CPRO 1002 or general computer proficiency. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1002 Essential Computer Skills (2 Credits)
This course enables students to master the computer. This course prepares students for success in courses requiring computer use. The course guides the student through basic and advanced computer operation. File system organization, drivers, firewalls, virus protection system configuration and troubleshooting the computer are topics of discussion. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1005 Command Prompt/Windows Scripting (3 Credits)
This course covers the MS-DOS Command Line and VBScripting using a practical step by step approach. This course also includes working with files and directories, managing the hard disk, using the troubleshooting tools, batch files, the Registry, TCP/IP, and FTP commands. Completion of CPRO 1002 or concurrent enrollment of CPRO 1002 is recommended for this course. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1010 Windows 2000 Professional (3 Credits)
This course serves as a general introduction for students to Microsoft' Windows 2000 Professional. Students will learn how to install 2000 Professional as well as use MMC, Task Scheduler and the Control Panel. Some other features covered will include: managing file systems, managing storage, user groups, profiles and policies, security and how to manage different network environments. Troubleshooting Windows 2000 and other applications will also be covered. This course will help students prepare for certification. Prereq: BUSO 1620. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1011 Windows Desktop Operating Systems (3 Credits)
This course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to install, configure, and administer Microsoft Windows desktop operating systems. This course was developed for information technology (IT) professionals who support, administer, or implement Windows Server networks and for individuals preparing to take any of the MCTS Windows Server Network Infrastructure Configuration Exams. This course contains material that is intended to help prepare students for certification. Prerequisites: CPRO 1002 or general computer proficiency. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1016 Windows Server Operating Systems (3 Credits)
This course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to install, configure, and administer Microsoft Windows server operating systems. This course was developed for information technology (IT) professionals who support, administer, or implement Windows Server networks and for individuals preparing to take any of the MCTS Windows Server Network Infrastructure Configuration Exams. This course contains material that is intended to help prepare students for certification. Prerequisites: CPRO 1011. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1021 Administering Active Directory Services (3 Credits)
This course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to install, configure, and administer Microsoft Windows Active Directory Services. This course was developed for information technology (IT) professionals who support, administer, or implement Active Directory Services, and for individuals preparing to take any of the MCTS Windows Server Network Infrastructure Configuration Exams. This course contains material that is intended to help prepare students for certification. Prerequisites: CPRO 1016. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1023 Windows 2000 Network Environment (3 Credits)
This is a comprehensive course that focuses on teaching a wide variety of knowledge and skills network administrators use to support an existing Windows 2000 network. It is presented in a task-oriented format that provides the student with the opportunity to apply these skills in laboratory network environment. This course will help students prepare for Microsoft exam 70-218. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)Prerequisite: CPRO1011, CPRO1015, CPRO1025

CPRO1026 Implementing and Managing a Windows Network (3 Credits)
This course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to configure, manage, and troubleshoot a Microsoft Windows network infrastructure. This course was developed for information technology (IT) professionals who support, administer, or implement Windows Server networks and for individuals preparing to take any of the MCTS Windows Server Network Infrastructure Configuration Exams. Prerequisites: CPRO 1016. This course contains material that is intended to help prepare students for certification. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1030 Designing a Windows 2000 Network Infrastructure (3 Credits)
This course will teach students Windows 2000 networking services that provide an IP networking infrastructure (TCP/IP, DHCP, DNSD), support remote users (dial-up remote access, RADIUS, and Connection Manager), provide IP routing, secure communication and manage access to the Internet This course will help students prepare for certification. Prereq: BUSO 1620 or equivalent. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab, 0 other

CPRO1041 Designing Security for a Windows Network (3 Credits)
This course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to protect the security of a Microsoft Windows network infrastructure. This course was developed for beginning information technology (IT) students who want to learn to design hardened networks with the most recent Microsoft operating systems and server applications. Students provide network design services for enterprises or use newly gained knowledge to work in a personal security consulting businesses. Designing Security for a Windows Network curriculum prepares students for the 70-298 exam: Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server Network. Prerequisites: CPRO 1016. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1045 Linux/Novell (3 Credits)
This course is designed to give students exposure to both the Novell and Linux operating systems. Some of the topics covered in this course are: Hardware requirements, designing the network, installing the software, managing groups and users, managing applications, plus more.
CPRO1060 Digital Video (2 Credits)
This course practices the principles of non-linear video editing. Streaming videos and audio are published on the World Wide Web. Video shooting and writing principles will be discussed, incorporating video terminology, editing, videography, authoring DVD's, and creating storybooks. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

CPRO1065 Linux Desktop Operating Systems (3 Credits)
This course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to install, configure, and administer Linux desktop operating systems. This course introduces students to the basic skills used by all Linux distributions. Specifically, the course covers the objectives outlined by CompTIA® for its Linux+ exam and certification. Prerequisites: CPRO 1002. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1068 Linux Network Security (3 Credits)
This course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to implement Linux server security. It is designed for individuals or information technology (IT) professionals who desire to move beyond the basics of Linux installation and administration into a broader study of the many security issues surrounding this operating system. Prerequisites: CPRO 1065. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1070 Exchange Server (3 Credits)
This course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to install, configure, and administer Microsoft Windows Exchange Server. This course was developed for information technology (IT) professionals who support, administer, or implement Exchange Server and for individuals preparing to take any of the MCTS Windows Server Network Infrastructure Configuration Exams. This course contains material that is intended to help prepare students for certification. Prerequisites: CPRO 1016 and CPRO 1021. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1075 Proxy Server (3 Credits)
This course is an in-depth look at Microsoft's Proxy Server. Students will learn about: Microsoft Proxy Server Architecture, Understanding TCP/IP, Internet Information Server Overview, Planning Your Proxy Server Implementation, Installing Microsoft Proxy Server , Proxy Client Configuration, Proxy Server Configuration, Managing and Tuning Proxy Server, Internet Access Via Proxy Server, Managing Multiple Proxy Servers, Network Address Translation and DNS Issues, Complex Deployment and Configuration Issues, Troubleshooting Proxy Server, and Predefined Winsock Proxy Protocols. This course will help students prepare for certification. Prereq: BUSO 1620 or equivalent. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1081 Internet Server Technologies (3 Credits)
This course teaches students the process of designing Web sites that are highly available. How to design network topologies that support redundant componets, connections, and services. How to incorporate various clustering technologies into the design, including the Windows 2000 Cluster service, Network Load Balancing (NLB), and Microsoft Application Center 2000. How to determine capacity requirements and how to integrate directory services and applications into the design. How to plan security, monitoring and auditing of Web Sites and how to plan a disaster recovery strategy. 3 credits - 3 lec Prerequisite: CPRO1010, CPRO1015, CPRO1020, AND CPRO1025

CPRO1085 Upgrading NT 4.0 to Windows 2000 (3 Credits)
Topics covered in this course will include: Installing the Windows 2000 family of operating systems, Configuring the Domain Name System (DNS) service, Simplifying system administration and site replication with Active Directory(tm) directory services, Using Group Policy to manage desktop environments and software, Managing and securing data resources with Microsoft Distributed File System (Dfs), NT File System 5 (NTFS 5), and Encrypting File System (EFS), Configuring remote access-protocols, I/O connections, policies, and profiles, Supporting Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) and Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) ,Implementing disaster protection and recovery, upgrading a network to Windows 2000-client and server paths. This course will help students prepare for certification. Prereq: BUSO 1620 or equivalent. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1095 Digital Photography with Adobe Photoshop (3 Credits)
This course focuses on the basics of digital photography with an emphasis on preparing images for the web. Students use Adobe Photoshop. The software program Photoshop is used to manipulate digital images and apply special effects. Students examine digital camera basics and the different features and techniques that can be used to take better pictures. Techniques to help organize and print digital images are demonstrated. Completion of CPRO 1002 or concurrent enrollment in CPRO 1002 is recommended for this course. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1150 Intro to Video (3 Credits)
Basic Vidio Technology will be discussed. Electronic Field Production, Electronic News Gathering and basic vidio editing techniques will be practiced. Prereq: none (3 Cr 1 lect/pres, 2 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1201 Intro to Telecommunications (3 Credits)
This course will help prepare students to enter the world of telecommunications. Students will be introduced to the basic telecommunication systems and the physical layer components that are present in this field. Students will learn the history and function of various systems. Introductions to cabling, safety, tools, testing and troubleshooting, and future technologies will also be covered. (3Cr - 2 lecture, 1 lab, 0 other) Prereq: none

CPRO1210 Introduction to Network Cabling (3 Credits)
This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become entry level technicians in the Network Cabling industry. The focus of this course is on tool use and construction techniques; the characteristics of various industry standards; and troubleshooting and repair. Prereq: CPRO1201. (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

CPRO1220 Introduction to Fiber Optics (2 Credits)
This course is designed to provide students with entry level theoretical and hands-on knowledge of Fiber Optics. The focus of this course is on fiber optic theory, tool use, and construction techniques; the characteristics of various fiber optic components; and troubleshooting and repair. Prereq: CPRO1200 and CPRO1210. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1230 Network Essentials Plus (3 Credits)
This course serves as a general introduction for current network technologies for local area networks (LANs), wide area networks, (WANs), and the Internet. It provides an introduction to the hardware, software, terminology, components, design, and connections of a network, as well as the topologies and protocols for LANs. It covers LAN-user concepts and the basic functions of system administration and operation. This course prepares students for certification testing. Prerequisites: CPRO 1002. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1300 Introduction to Visual Basics.net (3 Credits)
This course provides an introduction to programming for students with little or no background. The approach is object-orientated and data-driven. Students use programming applications found in the workplace and plan, program, and debug Visual Basic applications using modern programming techniques and conventions. Prerequisite: CPRO 1002. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1305 Designing & Implementing Desktop Applications with VB (3 Credits)
This course will provide students with information and hands-on exposure necessary for Designing and implementing Desktop Applications with Microsoft Visual Basics. This course will cover all of the new features of Visual Basics, including the Install Wizard, HTML Help, Deployment Wizard, and all new and revised controls. Topics covered include: Deriving the Physical Design, Establishing the Development Environment, Creating User Services, Creating and Managing COM Components, Creating Data Services using ADO, SQL and ActiveX Controls, Class Modules, Testing the Solution, Deploying the Application, and Maintaining and Supporting an Application. This course contains material that is intended to help prepare students for certification. (3CR - 1 lect, 2 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1310 Designing and Implementing Distributed Applications with Microsoft VB (3 Credits)
This course will provide students with information and hands-on exposure necessary to design and implement distributed application solutions by using Microsoft Visual Basic. The course will cover client/server applications that use a network in a mult-tier architecture to distribue their presentation services, business logic, and data services. Other topics covered include: Developing the Conceptual and Logical Design, Deriving the Physical Design, Establishing the Development Environment, Creating User Services, Creating and Managing COM Components, Creating Data Services, Testing the Solution, Deploying an Application, and Maintaining and Supporting an Application. This course contains material that is intended to help prepare students for certification. (3cr - 1 lect, 1 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1311 VB.net Web Applications (3 Credits)
This course is designed for the student who has a good Visual Basic Programming foundation. The course will focus on building web based applications and interfacing with databases. Students will learn sound programming techniques through hands-on exercises and case problems. The course will use real world MIS and business-related examples to help prepare students for their first job experience using Visual Basic. Students learn how to plan, program, and debug the Visual Basic applications using modern programming techniques and practicing good graphical user interface. Other topics covered include higher-level concepts such as database objects, SQL, custom controls, toolbars, advanced reports, and classes. Prerequisites: CPRO1300 Intro to VB.Net (3 C/ 1 lect/pres, 2 lab 0 other)

CPRO1315 Designing and Implementing Databases with Microsoft SQL Serrver (3 Credits)
This course will provide students with the knowledge necessary to design and implement a database solution by using Microsoft SQL Server 2000. The course will examine Database Normalization Rules, Primary Keys, Referential Integrity, and Business Rules. Topics covered include: Developing a Logical Data Model, Deriving the Physical Design, Creating Data Services, Creating a Physical Database, Maintaining a Database, Evaluating and Optimizing Performance, and Diagnosing Problems. This course contains material that is intended to help prepare students for certification. Prereq: BUSO1620, CPRO1900 (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1320 Microsoft Access (3 Credits)
This course focuses on teaching the knowledge and skills required to design, create, and manage a Microsoft Access database. It is presented using a case-based, problem-solving approach utilizing innovative technology for meaningful learning of Microsoft Access. Although this course is an integral part of the MCDBA program, it would also be appropriate for non-MCDBA students interested in mainly learning Microsoft Access. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab, 0 other) Prerequisite: None

CPRO1350 Intro to ASP.Net (3 Credits)
This course is designed for the student who has a foundation in Visual Basic Programming. The course focuses on building web-based applications and interfacing with databases. Students learn sound programming techniques. The course uses real world Management Information Specialists (MIS) and business-related examples to help prepare students for a first job experience using Visual Basic and ASP.Net. Students plan, program, and debug applications using modern programming techniques and practicing good graphical user interface. Other topics covered include higher-level concepts such as database objects, Structured Query Language (SQL), custom controls, toolbars, advanced reports, and classes. Prerequisites: CPRO 1300. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1400 Digital Video (2 Credits)
The principles of non-linear editing will be practiced. Streaming video and audio will be published on the World Wide Web. Shooting and writing principles for video will be discussed. Prereq: none (2 Cr 1 lect pres, 1 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1460 Introduction to 3D Graphics (3 Credits)
This course will focus on graphic techniques for video production and web pages. A significant amount of time will be dedicated to 3-D graphic animation. (3Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CPRO1465 3D Game Development (3 Credits)
Interactive 3d applications will be developed. The student will program and develop a 3d game environment. Macromedia Director will be used in the creation of Shockwave games. The games will be published on the World Wide Web. The programs used are subject to change depending on industry standards. (Prerequisites: CPRO1470 Intro to 2d Game Development, 1460 Intro to 3d Graphics.) (3 C/ 1 lec/pres, 2 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1470 Introduction to Shockwave Game Development (3 Credits)
This course assists a novice in developing the skills necessary to produce web games. Adobe Director will be used in the creation of Shockwave games. The games will be published on the World Wide Web. Completion of CPRO 1002 or concurrent enrollment in CPRO 1002 is recommended for this course. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1480 Multimedia Authoring (Authorware) (3 Credits)
Both linear and interactive multimedia will be learned. Microsoft's Power Point and presentation will be covered for the first fourth of the class. The remainder of the class will be spent working with MacroMedia Authorware creating interactive multimedia applications. The programs used are subject to change depending on industry standards. Prereq: None. (3Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CPRO1490 Intro to Mobile Application Development  (3 Credits)
This course covers the basic programing for creating mobile apps. The course is project oriented focusing on the major mobile platforms. SDK (software development kits) will be used in the creation of mobile apps. Native apps and mobile web apps will be discussed. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1590 Web Page Design I (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the pre-production process of designing a website. Website design and the decisions necessary for creating an effective web site are explored. Students create designs from start to finish using effective design principles. Web Design I offers a conceptual approach requiring a web designer to ask the necessary questions relevant to design and implementation on the web. Adobe Photoshop is the industry-standard digital imaging program used in this course and essential tools are used to create designs and apply them to web design compositions for the client. Web Design I is the first of a two-course sequence. Prerequisite: Basic computer literacy and a basic understanding of the Web. Prior use of an Adobe Product (such as Photoshop, Illustrator, or Premiere) is desirable but not required. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1595 Web Page Design II (3 Credits)
This course focuses on the production and post-production process of designing a website. The student explores website layout, interface design, and navigation issues. Website accessibility considerations are identified including support for visual, auditory, and speech disabilities. Media creation and adding interactive elements to the website are covered. Additional topics include web site testing, optimization, implementation, and hosting with an Internet Service Provider (ISP). Web designers identify techniques to advertise and promote a web site using search engines. Web Design II is the second of a two course sequence. Prerequisite: CPRO 1590. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1600 HTML I Programming (2 Credits)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of HTML 5 and Web standards. Students develop static web sites using hand coding HTML 5 and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). The course provides coverage of CSS design styles and portioning styles, resolving browser conflicts, using CSS with printed media and mobile output devices, and HTML tables and CSS table-related styles. The HTML and HTML 5 code complies with the Section 508 guidelines for accessibility. A simple text editor will be used to create the web pages giving the student a good foundation in reading and writing HTML and HTML 5 tags. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1610 HTML II Programming (2 Credits)
This course is a continuation of CPRO 1600 and focuses on the more advanced features of Web authoring, such as Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). CSS gives control over the appearance of the websites by separating the visual presentation from the content. In this course students build a website using CSS for layout. Adobe Dreamweaver is used as the HTML editor used by Web authoring professionals. Prerequisites: CPRO1600 or the equivalent. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1620 JavaScript/Perl (2 Credits)
This course will explain how to integrate Javascript into your web pages. Students will learn how to enhance their web pages using the Javascript language. We will also explore Java Applets and Perl programming. Prerequisite: Students must have a knowledge of HTML and be familiar with the tags. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1625 JavaScript and jQuery (3 Credits)
This course focuses on JavaScript which is extensively used in Web pages to add functionality, validate forms, detect browsers, and much more. JavaScript scripts are the ideal method of adding special effects to Web pages and are easy and enjoyable to learn. Students incorporate the JavaScript technology into existing Web pages. jQuery is a technology that works with JavaScript and has led to renewed interest in JavaScript for the Web. Prerequisites: CPRO 1600. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1630 Java Applets/Active X (2 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to Java Applets. Many web designers want to go beyond web pages with static content and using Java applets is one way to create web pages that will be dynamic. Students will become familiar with the Java programming environment and be able to successfully compile and run Java Applets. Prerequisite: Students must have a knowledge of HTML and be familiar with the tags. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1640 Intro to Adobe Flash (3 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity for students to create Web pages that include animation, interactivity, and sound. Adding multimedia features to web pages has become an essential part of web design. Adobe Flash will be used to create animations, videos, sound clips, special text effects, and interactivity. Completion of CPRO 1002 or concurrent enrollment in CPRO 1002 is recommended. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1645 Adobe Flash II with ActionScript (3 Credits)
The course provides the opportunity for developers to create online and standalone games using the latest software packages. The entire development process is practiced from design, story and character development, and to the physics and motion of a game. Optimization and deployment will also be practiced. Prerequisites: CPRO 1550. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1650 Web Graphics (2 Credits)
Students will learn how to adapt computer graphics to build effective Web pages. Images will be edited for size, color and format to conform to Web requirements. Effective design of Web pages will be studied, including page layout, navigational aids, links, usability, clarity, power to hold attention and attractiveness. Image file formats (JPEG, GIF and PNG) will be compared, studying the advantages and disadvantages of each. Web animation will focus on Flash, Quick Time, Java Script and animated GIFs. Prereq: CPRO1600 or the equivalent. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1660 Introduction to Web Animation (2 Credits)
Students will learn how to create Web pages that include animation, interactivity and sound. Adding multimedia features to web pages has become an essential part of web design. A professional Web animation program will be used to create animations, videos, sound clips, special text effects and interactivity. Prereq: CPRO1600 or the equivalent and CPRO1610. (2Cr - 2 Lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1665 Web Animation for Game Development (3 Credits)
The course teaches developers how to create online and standalone games using the latest software packages. The entire development process is practiced from design, story and character development to the physics and motion of a game. Optimization and deployment will also be practiced. (Prerequisites: CPRO 1660 Intro to Web Animation) (3 C/ 1 lec/pres, 2 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1670 Web Database/SQL (2 Credits)
Students will learn how to create Web pages that allow users to enter data to be stored in a database. Students will also learn how to select, then retrieve data from a database and display that data on a Web page. Cold Fusion Studio will be used to create the special tags needed, and SQL (Structured Query Language) will be used to select data to be retrieved from a database. Prereq: CPRO1600 or the equivalent and CPRO1610. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1675 Intro to Web Database with MySQL (2 Credits)
This course covers the basic concepts and techniques of databases using Structured Query Language (SQL). The MySQL database builds professional quality databases using a real world approach. Students use the SQL within the MySQL language. Other topics covered include an analysis of modern database design techniques, importing and exporting data, and query optimization. Completion of CPRO 1002 or concurrent enrollment in CPRO 1002 is recommended for this course. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1680 Special Web Topics (2 Credits)
Students will study new, emerging technologies in Web Page Design. This course will have a seminar structure, where students choose, study, and present new Web topics to the seminar group. Present, emerging, and future technologies will be discussed. Prereq: CPRO1600 or the equivalent CPRO1610, CPRO1650 and CPRO1660. (2Cr - 2 Lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1685 Intro to PHP & MySQL (2 Credits)
This course covers PHP and MySQL. Students set up a working environment and install PHP, MySQL, and Apache. PHP is an important tool for web developers. It is used to display dynamic content and manipulate databases. Using existing PHP scripts and building a content management system will also be covered. Dreamweaver's PHP features to build searchable, database-driven web applications will be explored. Prerequisites: CPRO 1600 and CPRO 1610. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1690 Dynamic Web Pages I: PHP (2 Credits)
This course will explain how to integrate scripts into your web pages. Students will learn how to enhance their web pages using the popular web scripting language PHP. The use of scripts will allow web developers to create dynamic web pages. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab, 0 other) Prerequisites: BUSO1620, CPRO1600, CPRO1610

CPRO1695 Dynamic Web Pages II: PHP/MySQL (2 Credits)
Students will learn how to create web pages that allow users to enter data to be stored in a database. Students will also learn how to select, then retrieve data from a database and display that data on a Web page. PHP/MySQL will be used to add the dynamic functionality to web pages. SQL (Structured Query Language) will be used to select data to be retrieved from a database. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab, 0 other) Prerequisites: BUSO1620, CPRO1600, CPRO1610, CPRO1690.

CPRO1700 Database Design (3 Credits)
This course offers extensive step-by-step instructions combined with hands-on exposure to enable users to learn the structure of building databases. Students will also learn how to manipulate and maintain the database. Pre-req: Intro to Computer or instructor consent.

CPRO1710 GUI Design (2 Credits)
This course will help users plan and develop well-designed Web sites that combine effective navigation with the judicious use of graphics, text, and color. Building on the user's HTML skills, users enhance Web pages and gain a critical eye for evaluating Web site design. Pre-req: HTML I & II or instructor consent.

CPRO1720 Apache Server (3 Credits)
This course offers the students extensive exposure for the deployment of a fully functional e-commerce application running on an Apache Server. Pre-req: Intro to Computer or instructor consent.

CPRO1730 Business to Business Communications (2 Credits)
This course offers students the tools and know-how for communicating with vendors and suppliers over the Web. This curriculum presents examples of streamlining how your business buys and sells using the Internet to send and receive invoices and payments, working in collaboration with other businesses over the Internet, and reducing operating costs using Internet solutions. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1740 Introduction to E-Commerce (2 Credits)
This course offers a quick, visual, and step-by-step approach for learning the concepts and processes necessary for building an e-commerce site. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 2 lect. 0 lab, 0 other)

CPRO1750 Intro to Social Media Marketing  (4 Credits)
This is an introductory course that explores the basics of social media marketing. Social Media has changed the way consumers communicate today and busines ses need to be a part of this change or they are at risk of losing significant marketing opportunities. Many different social media platforms exist and the best practices for these tools will be discussed. Every business could benefit by creating a custo mized social media strategy. Social Media Marketing will explore goal setting, strategy implementation, and crucial measurement tools. An emphasis will be placed on blogging and content writing for the web. Students should have basic computer literacy a nd a basic understanding of the Web. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. Students should have basic computer literacy and a basic understanding of the Web.

CPRO1755 Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and Analytics (3 Credits)
This course focuses on developing the skills needed for Search Engine Optimization (SEO). A wide variety of tasks will be used to improve a websites presence on search engines. Analytic tools will be used to analyze the traffic visiting a website. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1760 Social Media Campaigns  (3 Credits)
This course focuses on developing the skills required to manage and implement social media campaigns. The necessary elements and stages of a successful social media campaign, from concept to implementation to analytics will be covered. Students use current project management software and social media to manage a classroom project. Students must have Windows operating system experience. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1790 Intro to Web Database with MySQL (3 Credits)
This course covers the basic concepts and techniques of databases using Structured Query Language (SQL). The MySQL database builds professional quality databases using a real world approach. Students use the SQL within the MySQL language. Other topics covered include an analysis of modern database design techniques, importing and exporting data, and query optimization. Completion of CPRO 1002 or concurrent enrollment in CPRO 1002 is recommended for this course. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr -3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1795 Introduction to PHP and MySQL (3 Credits)
This course covers PHP and MySQL. Students set up a working environment and install PHP, MySQL, and Apache. PHP is an important tool for web developers. It is used to display dynamic content and manipulate databases. Using existing PHP scripts and building a content management system will also be covered. Dreamweaver¿s PHP features to build searchable, database-driven web applications will be explored. Prerequisites: CPRO 1600 and CPRO 1610. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr ¿ 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1805 Portfolio Preparation (1 Credits)
This introductory course gives students the opportunity to explore and understand the concepts of a digital portfolio. A portfolio is an organized collection of documents from personal, learning, and professional achievements. Students carefully plan both the structure and content of a portfolio. A well-composed portfolio is essential when meeting with potential employers or clients. In this class, students plan and prepare to develop a unique portfolio of individual work and are encouraged to keep samples of work as they progress through coursework and careers. Students are encouraged to enroll in CPRO 1805 as early as possible in their collegiate career to help them start planning the portfolio. Students should then take CPRO 1810 to complete the portfolio and the degree. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1810 Portfolio Assembly and Production (1 Credits)
This course focuses on the process of putting together all the different aspects of a portfolio. This course examines the process of assembling work into a professional portfolio that can be used to showcase work. Each student chooses a portfolio format such as CD-ROM, web-based, or other media format available and builds a professional portfolio. Students use the necessary software and technical tools to build a portfolio. Prerequisite: CPRO 1805. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1900 Cisco Networking 1 (3 Credits)
This course provides the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in networking careers such as network technicians, network administrators, and network engineers. It provides a theoretically-rich, hands-on introduction to networking and the Internet. Upon completion of this course, students have a thorough understanding of computer and networking basics. This course helps prepare students for industry standard certifications. Prerequisites: CPRO 1002 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1910 Cisco Networking 2 (3 Credits)
This course provides the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in networking careers such as network technicians, network administrators, and network engineers. It provides a theoretically-rich, hands-on introduction to networking and the Internet. Upon completion of this course, students have a thorough understanding of routing protocols and concepts. This course helps prepare students for industry standard certifications. Prerequisites: CPRO 1900. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1920 Cisco Networking 3 (3 Credits)
This course provides the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in networking careers such as network technicians, network administrators, and network engineers. Upon completion of this course, students have a thorough understanding of VLAN, wireless, switching and intermediate routing technologies. This course helps prepare students for industry standard certifications. Prerequisites: CPRO 1900 and CPRO 1910. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1930 Cisco Networking 4 (3 Credits)
This course provides the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in networking careers such as network technicians, network administrators, and network engineers. Upon completion of this course, students have a thorough understanding of VPN technology, router security, and Wide Area Networking (WAN) basics. This course helps prepare students for industry standard certifications. Prerequisites: CPRO 1900, CPRO 1910, and CRPO 1920. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1940 Cisco Wireless Networking (3 Credits)
This course provides the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in networking careers such as network technicians, network administrators, and network engineers. Upon completion of this course, students have a thorough understanding of the design, planning, implementation, operation and troubleshooting of Wireless LANs. This course helps prepare students for industry standard Cisco Advanced Wireless LAN Field Specialist certifications. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO1960 Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) Fundamentals (3 Credits)
This course teaches the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in networking-related job responsibilities such as network technicians, network administrators, and network engineers. Upon completion of Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) Fundamentals, students will have a thorough understanding of the design, planning, implementation, operation and troubleshooting of VOIP technology. This is a hybrid course which delivers online curriculum, online assessment, online virtual network lab simulations, and instructor led hands-on classroom labs and lectures. This course helps prepare students for the globally recognized industry standard Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) Voice certification. Prerequisites: CPRO 1930 or a valid CCNA Certificate (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

CPRO2000 Network Security Fundamentals (3 Credits)
This course provides an introduction to network security principles, application, configuration, and management. The theoretical and historical background necessary for understanding the security field in the 21st century are discussed. Current risks and threats are explored and structured methods of addressing and safeguarding critical economic assets are addressed. Students gain the broad based knowledge necessary for further study in more specialized areas of network security. This is an online course. This course prepares students for the industry standard CompTIA Security + certificate. Prerequisites: CPRO 1002. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO2005 Firewalls, VPN, and Intrusion Detection (3 Credits)
This course provides an introduction to firewalls, intrusion detection systems, and Virtual Private Networks (VPN), along with other network security components to develop a complete network security solution. Important topics related to firewalls and network security are covered, including packet filtering, proxy servers, authentication, encryption, and securing host computers. Advanced topics such as setting up a VPN, building a firewall, and performing system administration are explored. This course prepares students for the industry standard CompTIA Security+ certificate. Prerequisites: CPRO 2000. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO2010 Computer Forensics and Investigations (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to one of the newest and fastest growing fields in computer technology. Computer Forensics and Investigations presents methods required to properly conduct a computer forensics investigation. This introductory course aligns with the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification and provides a range of laboratory and hands-on assignments that teach the theory as well as the practical application of computer forensic investigation. This course prepares students for the industry standard CompTIA Security + and IACIS certificates. Prerequisites: CPRO 1002 or basic computer skills. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO2020 Virtualization Technology Fundamentals (3 Credits)
This course provides the skills and knowledge necessary to implement and administer server and desktop virtualization. This course is for information technology (IT) professionals who support, administer, or implement server virtualization systems. This course prepares students for industry standard Microsoft and VMware virtualization certifications. Prerequisites: CPRO 1016. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO2100 Cisco Network Security (3 Credits)
This course provides the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in networking careers such as network technicians, network administrators, and network engineers. Upon completion of Cisco Network Security, students have a thorough understanding of the design, planning, implementation, operation, and troubleshooting of Cisco Network Security devices. This course prepares students for the Implementing Cisco IOS Network Security (IINS) certification exam. Prerequisites: CPRO 1900 and CPRO 1930. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO2320 Delphi (3 Credits)
This course will introduce students to programming with Delphi. The course will include basic programming topics as well as more advanced features such as COM, CORBA, and Active X. Students will learn how to use direct calls to the Windows API to add features to existing applications. Topics covered include: Object Pascal with the VCL, Developing database applications, Distributed applications, Custom componets, Creating muli-tiered applications, Building Libraries, and Developing the application user interfase. (3cR - 1 lect, 2 lab, 0 other)

CPRO2325 Analyzing Requirements and Defining Solution Architecture (3 Credits)
This course will provide students with the ability to analyze business requirements in a given scenanio and then define technical solution architecture that will optimize business results by using Microsoft develpment tools. The course will give students an understanding of the hardware and software architectures behind programming. It surveys VB, VB Script, Active X, and Active Server pages. Topics covered will include: Analyzing Business Requirements, Defining the Technical Architecture for a Solution, Developing the Conceptual and Logical Design for an Application, Developing Data Moduals, Designing a User Interface and User Services, Deriving the Physical Design, Implementing Data Data Services with SQL Server, and Microsoft Operating Systems and Application Development Tools. This course contains material that is intended to help prepare students for certification. >prereq: CPRO1300, CPRO1305, CPRO1310> (3Cr - 1 lect. 2 ;ab. 0 other)

CPRO2400 Project Management (2 Credits)
This course focuses on developing the skills required to manage software projects such as web sites. The necessary elements and stages of a successful project life cycle from concept to final product will be covered. Students use current project management software to manage a classroom project. Students must have Windows operating system experience. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO2410 Instructional Design (3 Credits)
The creation of effective teaching modules will be discussed. (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

CPRO2420 Copyright Laws (1 Credits)
As the Internet has become world-wide, new legal issues have been discovered which involve business, educational institutions, and personal users of the World Wide Web. Issues which formally only crossed city or state lines now cross country borders and continents. In this class we will examine many of these issues that a Webmaster will face, including copyright, technology export and import, encryption, privacy, and international laws. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO2600 Certification Preparation (3 Credits)
This course is designed to prepare for and to take an industry certification exam. The students will focus on passing at least one industry certification. Recommended certification exams include World Organization of Webmasters (WOW), Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Dreamweaver, Adobe Flash, A+ , Cisco, Microsoft, or others. The student is required to attempt the certification test at the completion of the course. Prerequisites: CPRO 1550. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO2610 Internship (1 Credits)
This course is designed to prepare for and to take an industry certification exam. The students will focus on passing at least one industry certification. Recommended certification exams include World Organization of Webmasters (WOW), Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Dreamweaver, Adobe Flash, A+ , Cisco, Microsoft, or others. The student is required to attempt the certification test at the completion of the course. Prerequisites: CPRO 1550. This course is part of the Computer Technology program which is an accredited program in World Organization of Webmaster (WOW) Professional Academy. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CPRO2620 Internship (2 Credits)
Students secure an internship to apply the computer technology skills learned in their course of study. A Skills-based training plan is developed between the student, advisor and employer (1CR OJJT)

CPRO2640 Internship (4 Credits)
Students secure an internship to apply the computer technology skills learned in their course of study. A Skills-based training plan is developed between the student, advisor and employer (1CR OJJT)

CRJU1101 Criminal Justice Field Experience I (1 Credits)
This course involves a 30 hour on-site experience in a professional criminal justice/corrections/law enforcement/government agency or other non-profit organization. The student is required to complete 30 hours of observation and direct service at the field site. Students participate in progress meetings to process experiences in the professional environment. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Criminal Justice or Law Enforcement program. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

CRJU1102 Criminal Justice Field Experience II (1 Credits)
This course involves a subsequent 30 hour on-site experience in a professional criminal justice/corrections/law enforcement/government agency or other non-profit organization. The student is be required to complete 30 hours through direct service at the field site and participate in progress meetings to process experiences in the professional environment. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Criminal Justice or Law Enforcement program. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

CRJU1103 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 Credits)
This course addresses the Criminal Justice Process, Constitutional and Criminal Law for Law Enforcement, the Criminal Justice System, Civil Law, Civil Liability and Civil Process, and Juvenile Law and Procedure. Students gain a general knowledge and background of the history and development of the criminal justice system and the various theories, concepts, and resources used and currently utilized in this field. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CRJU1135 Victimology (3 Credits)
This course focuses on victims themselves. Most courses in criminology focus on the offenders and various criminal offenses, with only cursory examination of their victims. The term "victimology" generically refers to the study of victims patterns, characteristics, and the various types of harm victims incur. The role of victims in the criminal justice system throughout history, the nature and extent of crime victimization, and victim characteristics will be studied. Also covered are the various types of costs experienced by victims, as well as the various legal rights of the victims. The myths of victim precipitation and various efforts to blame victims for their own victimization, as well as other factors that influence victimization (e.g., drugs and alcohol and the mass media) are included. Specific types of victims (e.g., sexual assault, domestics violence, homicide) and their treatment in the criminal justice system will be discussed. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CRJU2200 Criminal Justice Internship (4 Credits)
This course involves 100 hours on-site experience in a professional criminal justice/corrections/law enforcement/government agency or non-profit organization. The student is required to complete 100 hours of observation and direct service at the field site and participate in progress meetings to process experiences in the professional environment. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Criminal Justice or Law Enforcement program. (4 Cr - 0 lect, 4 lab)

CRJU2201 Corrections and Penology (3 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the corrections field in the United States. Students examine the corrections systems used in Minnesota and other states. Community corrections as well as other correctional systems are explored. Various correctional treatment methods and sentencing alternatives are examined. The county jail, state, and federal prison systems are discussed with a focus on the functions of the institutions. Levels of security for inmates within various institutions are explored. Probation and parole functions are introduced with an exploration of the various levels of service offered. Field trips to various correctional facilities (both adult and juvenile) may be incorporated into this class. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

CRTS1100 Intro to Collision Repair (3 Credits)
This course introduces the collision repair industry, its careers, and work standards. Basic shop procedures are covered in this course and students gain insight to the equipment, special tools, fasteners, and personal safety practices used in collision repair. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CRTS1104 Collision Repair Welding I (4 Credits)
This course includes student safety procedures, familiarization with oxyacetylene, Metal Inert Gas (MIG), set-ups, and operation. Students practice welding in flat, vertical, and overhead positions. This course also covers methods to skillfully repair rusted body panels and reconstruct body panel shapes and lines. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CRTS1107 Collision Repair Sheet Metal I & Glass Service (4 Credits)
This course includes different types of sheet metal damage, safe use of tools and equipment, and various methods of hands-on metal damage repairs. Safe procedures for removal and replacement of stationary and moveable auto glass are also covered. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CRTS1112 Refinishing I (2 Credits)
This course in collision repair covers basic refinishing safety, proper use of refinish tools, equipment, and the maintenance and cleaning of these products. Integration of skills needed in paint removal, sanding, undercoat mixing, labeling and application procedures are emphasized. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

CRTS1116 Body Filler I (2 Credits)
This course introduces proper usage and application of various automotive body fillers, sanding, forming, and shaping filler to match contours of today's complex vehicle construction. Developing skills needed for entry level efficiency are emphasized. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

CRTS1205 Collision Repair Welding II (4 Credits)
This course covers safe welding techniques including Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding of high strength steel and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and MIG welding of aluminum. It also includes corrosion protection materials, product safety, tools, equipment, and applications. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100 and CRTS 1104. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CRTS1208 Sheet Metal II & Damage Report (4 Credits)
This collision repair course covers safe sheet metal panel replacement, adjustment, metal identification, and its repairability. Identification and calculation of vehicle damage are also included. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100 and CRTS 1107. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CRTS1213 Refinishing II (4 Credits)
This advanced course in collision repair course covers the preparation and application of a variety of coatings ranging from two component prime coats, basecoat/clearcoat, and tri-coat pearl finishes used on current Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) vehicles. Students computerize color mixing using digital scales as well as demonstrating the process of baking a finish to duplicate OEM quality standards in refinishing. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100 and CRST 1112. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CRTS1217 Body Filler II & Fiberglass Repair (3 Credits)
ThisThis collision repair course covers efficient use of time, speed, and production to industry standards when working with body fillers. Safe procedures, product knowledge and techniques in fiberglass repair are also covered. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100 and CRTS 1116. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CRTS1301 Applied Collision Repair Practices I (1 Credits)
This course has been designed to enable participants to work independently on skill development in a specific area of Collision Repair. Application of competencies gained from previous work experience and or coursework will be emphasized. Specific tasks to be accomplished by the participant will be identified in an individualized training plan. Prereq: CRTS 1100 and an individualized training plan developed jointly by instructor and student. (1Cr - 0 lect/pres, 1 lab, 0 other)

CRTS1302 Applied Collision Repair Practices II (2 Credits)
This course allows participants to work independently on skill development in a specialized area of Auto/Truck Body Repair. Application of competencies gained from previous work experience and/or coursework are emphasized. Specific tasks are identified and accomplished through an individualized training plan. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100 and individualized training plan developed jointly by the instructor and the participant. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

CRTS1303 Applied Collision Repair Practices III (3 Credits)
This course has been designed to enable participants to work independently on skill development in a specific area of Collision Repair. Application of competencies gained from previous work experience and or coursework will be emphasized. Specific tasks to be accomplished by participants will be identified in an individualized training plan. Prereq: CRTS1100 and an individualized training plan developed jointly by instructor and student. (3Cr - 0 lect/pres, 3 lab, 0 other)

CRTS1304 Applied Collision Repair Practices IV (2 Credits)
This course allows participants to work independently on skill development in a specific area of Collision Repair. Application of competencies gained from previous work experience and or coursework are emphasized. Specific tasks to be accomplished by the participant are identified in an individualized training plan. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS1100 and individualized training plan developed jointly by instructor and student. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

CRTS1305 Applied Collision Repair Practices V (2 Credits)
This course has been designed to enable participants to work independently on skill development in a specific area of Auto Body Repair. Application of competencies gained from previous work experience and or coursework will be emphasized. Specific tasks to be accomplished by the participant will be identified in an individualized training plan. Prereq: CRTS 1100 and an individualized training plan jointly developed by instructor and student. (2Cr - 0 lect / pres, 2 lab, 0 other)

CRTS1306 Applied Collision Repair Practices VI (2 Credits)
This course has been designed to enable participants to work independently on skill development in a specific area of Auto Body Repair. Application of competencies gained from previous work experience and or coursework will be emphasized. Specific tasks to be accomplished by the participant will be identified in a individualized training plan. Prereq: CRTS1100 individualized training plan developed jointly by instructor and student. (2Cr - 0 lect/pres, 2 lab, 0 other)

CRTS2100 Basic Auto Collision Mechanical & Electrical (4 Credits)
This course covers the safe removal and installation of mechanical automotive parts which have sustained collision damage. Basic fundamentals of automotive electricity, circuit types, volt/ohm testing diagrams, and wire circuit repair procedures are also included. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: Successful completion of all first year course work or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CRTS2108 Color Matching (2 Credits)
This course in collision repair covers the identification and correction of color matching problems. The techniques of tinting, blending, and paint finish detailing are thoroughly examined. Skills needed to make isolated repairs in automotive finishes of all types are also included. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100, CRTS 1112, and CRTS 1213 or with the approval of instructor. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

CRTS2112 Collision Repair Plastic Repairing (2 Credits)
This plastic repair course covers identification of several types of automotive plastic. Safe repair procedures in airless welding and adhesive repair methods and application of color to interior and exterior automotive plastics are also included. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100 or instructor approval. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

CRTS2114 Refinishing III (3 Credits)
This course in collision repair covers advanced refinishing techniques. Lab activities include additional skill practice in surface preparation, undercoat selection and application, color matching, blending and final application of topcoats. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRST 1100, CRST 1112, and CRST 1213. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CRTS2116 Major Collision I (4 Credits)
This course in collision repair covers proper clamping techniques, measuring and pulling procedures to repair direct and indirect damage on open and closed panels in late-model unibody collision-damaged vehicles. Correct replacement techniques for collision-damaged panels are also included. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100 or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CRTS2215 Refinishing IV (4 Credits)
This course in collision repair covers efficient use of time, speed and quality of the finished product measured against industry standards. Students practice and improve application techniques needed to become a professional painter. Care and maintenance of spray equipment are also included. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100, CRTS 1112, CRTS 1213, and CRTS 2114. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CRTS2217 Major Collision II (4 Credits)
This course in collision repair covers allows students to practice I-Car methods when repairing unibody and conventional frame vehicles. Students learn computerized laser measuring techniques and perform panel and section repairs. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100 and CRTS 2116, or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

CRTS2220 Basic Wheel Alignment (2 Credits)
This course in collision repair introduces students to suspension and steering types. Students also correct suspension and wheel alignment problems with a modern computerized alignment system. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS 1100 or with the approval of instructor. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

CRTS2224 General Truck Body (3 Credits)
This course in collision repair covers parts identification and various skills involved in truck repair. Safety procedures needed in the lab area are also covered. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: Successfully complete all first year course work or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

CRTS2228 Auto Collision Shop Management (2 Credits)
This course covers awareness of small business costs, responsibilities, basic management skills, employee - employer relations, and customer relations. Students design a fully equipped collision shop and go through a finance worksheet with employees to determine cash flow to project failure or success. This course is part of the Collision Repair program which is accredited by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Prerequisites: CRTS1100. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL1101 Shop Safety, Tools & Equipment (2 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce, perfect, and evaluate basic safety and shop skills necessary for successful completion of the Diesel Technology program. The course consists of instruction and shop performance exercises in safety, hand and machine tool operation, use and maintenance, tool identification and other basic shop skills. This course complies with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing, eye protection, hand tools, power equipment, and proper ventilation. The handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals and materials in accordance with federal, state, and local regulations are also covered. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL1102 Introduction to the Diesel Engine (2 Credits)
This course covers the basic theory and operation of the diesel engine and each of its major systems. Maintenance and repair of medium duty diesel engines are introduced. This course is taken in the same semester as DESL 1103. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

DESL1103 Applied Diesel Engines Lab (3 Credits)
This course requires students to safely disassemble a diesel training engine. The students clean up, label, measure, evaluate, and properly reassemble all components. Adjustments are made to the engine's fuel system. The project engine must be correctly assembled and run properly at the end of the course. A workbook is completed which tracks progress through the project. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

DESL1104 Introduction to Electrical Systems (2 Credits)
This course covers electrical theory, circuit analysis, use of special tools and equipment, and basic electrical circuit troubleshooting. It also covers circuit wire diagrams and construction of circuits, diagnostics, and repair of the charging systems. Electric starting system and other electrical systems on commercial vehicles are covered. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

DESL1105 Applied Electrical Systems Lab (3 Credits)
This course covers application of electrical circuit analysis, the use of special tools and equipment, and basic electrical system troubleshooting. Construction and diagnosis repair of the charging systems and electrical starting system on commercial vehicles and farm equipment are also included. Topics include basic system, system diagnosis, component repair, and troubleshooting of lights and electrical accessories. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisite: DESL 1104. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

DESL1106 Clutch and Manual Transmission I (3 Credits)
This course introduces students to the basic welding processes commonly used in the Automotive and Diesel Technology area where certified welds are not required. Basic theory and application of the welding processes along with flat position welding using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes are included. Safety practices and equipment required for the safe use of plasma cutting equipment are introduced. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL1107 Industry Related Welding (2 Credits)
This course introduces students to the basic welding processes commonly used in the Automotive and Diesel Technology area where certified welds are not required. Basic theory and application of the welding processes along with flat position welding using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes are included. Safety practices and equipment required for the safe use of plasma cutting equipment are introduced. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL1114 Commercial Vehicle Preventative Maintenance and Inspection (3 Credits)
This course covers preventative maintenance procedures approved by The Maintenance Council (TMC) to effectively lower overall operating costs for trucking companies. Annual vehicle safety inspection for Minnesota Department of Transportation regulation compliance is covered. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section VII of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: DESL 1101. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

DESL1117 Caterpillar Engines and Fuel Systems (3 Credits)
This course covers maintenance procedures, repairs, and basic diagnostics for Caterpillar (CAT) models 3406, C-10/12, and 3406E diesel engines. Service and maintenance information in CAT literature and Service Informational System (SIS) software are covered. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth in Section I of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: DESL 1101. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

DESL1208 Air & Hydraulic Brakes (2 Credits)
This course covers air and hydraulic brake assemblies used on trucks and trailers. Evaluating and repairing brake systems to the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) #120 requirements are also covered. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL1209 Commercial Vehicle HVAC Systems (2 Credits)
This course covers the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems used in today's Commercial vehicles. Topics include R12 systems, R134A systems, system diagnostics, refrigerant identification, EPA regulations, and HVAC Technician Certification. Prereqs: DESL1104. (2Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL1210 Diesel Project Lab (4 Credits)
This course covers all aspects of repair of heavy-duty diesel equipment. Included are diagnosis, customer communication, writing work orders, preparing a parts list, coordinating outside work, repair procedures, and testing of the finished job. The student is largely responsible to find this project. It can be chosen from a wide range of repair jobs; but must relate to diesel equipment. Instructor will have final say on what projects qualify. It must be 60 hours in length as determined by an industry flat rate manual. Two or more smaller projects may be selected if flat rate requirement is met. Prereqs: TDSL1932 (4Cr - 0 lect, 4 lab)

DESL1211 Electronic Engine Controls I (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to electronic controls for diesel engines. Basic theory of operation, adjustments and diagnostics are covered. Detroit Diesel Electronic Controls (DDEC) system and Detroit Diesel Diagnostic Link (DDDL) software are introduced. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

DESL1212 Introduction to Hydraulics (2 Credits)
This course covers basic hydraulic systems and the operation of the components that make up the different types of systems. Basic hydraulic system nomenclature is introduced. Troubleshooting, repair, and adjustment of various components are also covered. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL1213 Diesel Fuel Systems I (2 Credits)
This course covers the basic theory and operation of common diesel engine fuel transfer systems. Fuel characteristics, grades, filtration, and safe handling are included. The student performs maintenance, diagnostics, and repair of fuel systems found on medium duty diesel engines. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2114 Commercial Vehicle Preventive Maintenance & Inspections (2 Credits)
This course covers preventative maintenance procedures approved by The Maintenance Council (TMC), to effectively lower overall operating costs for trucking companies. Annual vehicle safety inspections for Minnesota Department of Transportation regulation compliance will be covered as well. Prereqs: DESL 1101 (2Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2115 Commercial Vehicle ABS Braking Systems (1 Credits)
This course covers the major components of the anti-lock brake system (ABS) and electronic brake systems. How to manage these controls and systems, diagnose ABS faults, service valves and modulators and wheel sensors, and how these systems have to meet Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) # 121 requirements are also included. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2117 Caterpillar Engines & Fuel Systems (3 Credits)
This course covers maintenance procedures, repairs, and basic diagnostics for Caterpillar models: 3406C, C-10/12, and 3406E Diesel engines. Finding service and maintenance information in CAT literature and SIS software will be covered. Prereqs: DESL 1101 and1102. (3Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2118 Commercial Vehicle Power Trains I (2 Credits)
This course covers manual and manual/automatic transmission service on all twin countershaft transmission. Topics include Fuller/Eaton, Meritor/Rockwell, and computer controlled transmissions. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2119 Commercial Vehicle Steering & Suspension Systems (3 Credits)
This course covers manual and power steering systems common on today's medium and heavy trucks. Steering axle alignment and repair are covered as well as tire wear analysis. The second part of the course introduces popular suspension systems found on commercial vehicles. Drive axle alignment, frames, spring and air ride suspension repair and adjustment are also covered. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: DESL 1101. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2120 Commercial Vehicle Drive Lines (1 Credits)
This course covers driveline components, identification, preventative maintenance, driveline angles, phasing of driveshafts, U-joint replacement and driveline retarders. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2209 Commercial Vehicle HVAC Systems (3 Credits)
This course covers the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems used in today's commercial vehicles. Topics include R12 systems, R134A systems, system diagnostics, refrigerant identification, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations, and HVAC Technician Certification. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisite: DESL 1104. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2210 Diesel Project Lab (4 Credits)
This course covers all aspects of heavy-duty diesel equipment. Included are diagnosis, customer communication, writing work orders, preparing a parts list, coordination outside work, repair procedures, and testing of the finished job. Finding the diesel project is the responsibility of the student. It can be chosen from a wide range of repair jobs and must relate to diesel equipment. Instructor must approve what projects qualify. The project must be 60 hours in length as determined by an industry flat rate manual. Two or more smaller projects may be selected if flat rate requirement is met. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (4 Cr - 0 lect, 4 lab)

DESL2221 Electronic Engine Controls II (2 Credits)
This course covers theory, diagnosis, and repair of the electronic engine controls used on Cummins Diesel engines. Cummins Intel Software Index and Technology Exchange (INSITE), Caterpillar Service Information System (SIS), and International Master Diagnostic (MD) software familiarization are included in this course. Hydraulic Electronic Unit Injector (HEUI) fuel system used on both International and Caterpillar diesel engines are emphasized. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. Prerequisites: DESL 1101. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2222 Automated Transmissions (4 Credits)
This course covers the basic skills needed to understand operation, preventative maintenance (PM) nomenclature, and parts ordering for Allison transmissions. Lab work includes testing, troubleshooting, adjustments and major overhaul of Allison transmissions. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

DESL2223 Cummins Engines & Fuel Systems (2 Credits)
This course covers maintenance procedures, repairs, and basic diagnostics for Cummins models, NTC 855, M11, N14, and ISX engines. Intel Software Index and Technology Exchange (INSITE) software is used to communicate with these systems. Quick Serve Online software accesses service information. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2224 Diesel Information Systems (2 Credits)
This course covers computerized information systems used in the truck repair business. These systems include work order, inventory, multimedia training and the World Wide Web. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2225 Commercial Vehicle Power Trains II (3 Credits)
This course covers identification, preventative maintenance (PM), troubleshooting, and major overhaul of live front and rear drive axles assemblies. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2226 Diesel Technology Internship (4 Credits)
This course is designed to provide the student a purposeful occupational experience in the diesel career field. A training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site. The advisor coordinates and monitors the progress of the internship. One credit of internships is equal to 48 hours of career-related employment. This internship consists of 192 hours. The student must arrange the internship with instructor approval. This course, along with other program courses, satisfies the task requirements set forth by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation. (4 Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 4 other)

DESL2227 Automotive Diesel Applications (2 Credits)
This course covers the basic theory and operation of the diesel engine and each of its major systems. The course includes an introduction to the maintenance and repair of diesel engines commonly found in light and medium duty truck applications. The course also includes basic diagnostic testing for the Power stroke? diesel used by Ford, and the ISB Cummins? diesel found in Dodge applications. Prerequisites none: DESL 1102 or TAST 1311 recommended (2 CR 1 lecture, 1 lab 0 other)

DESL2501 Combine Repair (3 Credits)
This course covers the operation of the Rotary and Conventional Combine. Students will completely disassemble combines by removing auger shafts, bearings, sprockets and pulleys in the school lab. Weather permitting a trip to a field during harvest to inspect combine adjustment and measure field loss will occur. (3Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2502 Hydraulics I (2 Credits)
This course covers the theory of the basic hydraulic system of the Ag tractor and combine. Hydraulic systems are divided into two different systems, the open and closed center systems. Students will study the operation of pumps and control valves as they differ within these systems by tracing oil flow throughout the system. Prereqs: DESL 1212 (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

DESL2503 Applied Hydraulics Lab I (2 Credits)
This course covers the identification of hydraulic systems of Ag tractors. Hydraulics diagrams, pumps, open and closed center hydraulic systems, control valves, seals are studied and repaired. Students will diagnose and repair hydraulic pumps, control valves and actuators. Students will find these hydraulic systems on most agricultural tractors and combines. Prereqs: DESL 2502. (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2504 Diesel Fuel Systems II (2 Credits)
This course covers the identification and theory of operation of Stanadyne, Ambac, and Robert Bosch diesel fuel systems. The study of diesel fuel systems is designed to enable the student to troubleshoot fuel injection systems. Turbo-chargers are also taught in this course. Students will be provided ample "hands-on" experience timing and adjusting injection pumps on engines and tractors in the lab. Special tools such as PTO dynamometer are used for checking horsepower and torque in the lab. Prereqs: DESL 1102 (1Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2505 Mechanical Transmissions (2 Credits)
This course covers study of Ag tractor gear type transmissions. We will identify power flow through the various types of gears and shafts used in the Ag tractor. The student will remove, replace, rebuild and adjust various makes and types of transmissions. We will also repair the complicated shifting linkage system used to control these transmissions. Prereqs: DESL 1106 (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2506 Differentials & Final Drives (2 Credits)
This course covers the differential and final drives used in the Ag tractor. The students will remove, repair and replace and adjust the tractor differential and various types of final drives as the required course work is completed in this course. We will also discuss the operation and repair of various types of hydraulic brakes found in the final drives on Ag tractors. Prereqs: DESL 1106 (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2507 Engine Clutch & PTO (2 Credits)
This course covers the operation of Ag tractor clutches. We will repair the wet and dry style of clutch used in the Ag tractor and also the power take-off unit. We will disassemble, service and adjust these units in this class. Prereqs: DESL 1106 (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2508 Gas Engine Systems (1 Credits)
This course covers the operation of the gas engine used in the Ag tractor. We will study the operation of the spark ignition, the fuel system and also including the governor by disassembling and rebuilding these components. Prereqs: DESL 1102, DESL 1104. (1Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2509 Hydraulics II (1 Credits)
This course covers theory of ag tractor hydraulic systems. Students will use diagrams and JIC symbols while studying hydraulic systems. Tracing oil flow, identifying and diagnosing the hitch control valves is also covered. Prereqs: DESL 1212 (1cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

DESL2510 Applied Hydraulics Lab II (2 Credits)
This course covers testing and diagnosis of hydraulic systems. Students will use diagrams and JIC symbols to test and repair hydraulic systems. Tracing oil flow, identifying and testing the hitch control valves is also covered. Prereqs: DESL 2509. (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2511 Hydrostatic Transmissions (1 Credits)
This course covers theory and operation of the hydrostatic transmission. The student will test, repair and complete the necessary adjustment for a hydrostatic transmission. Tracing oil flow, identifying and testing the control valves is also covered. Prereqs: DESL 2502. (1Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

DESL2512 Power Shift Transmissions (2 Credits)
This course covers operation, tracing power flow, and diagnosing problems. Students perform testing, disassembly, repairing reassembly and adjusting of the power shift transmission. Prereqs: DESL 1212, DESL 2505. (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

DESL2513 Applied Transmissions Lab (2 Credits)
This course covers operation, tracing power flow, and diagnosing problems. Students perform testing, disassembly, repairing reassembly and adjusting of the power shift transmission. Prereqs: DESL 1212, DESL 2505. (2Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

DIGI1100 Introduction to Digital Media (3 Credits)
This course is an introductory exposure to the creative process, integrating fundamental aspects of art, music, theatre, and film with new technology in digital media. Students will apply learned visual, aural, and design principals by creating and editing digital images, sound, and video using the Mac OS. Students will address multimedia concepts in the development and creation of a final interdisciplinary project. MnTC (Goals 2/CT and 6/HU); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ECON1100 Introduction to Economics (2 Credits)
This course is an analysis of current United States and world policies, issues and problems using some basic principles of economics. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 2/CT); (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

ECON2291 Macroeconomics (3 Credits)
This course introduces the basic principles and methods of economics and then applies them to national income accounts, aggregate supply and demand, business cycles, economic growth and monetary and fiscal policy. There will be a special emphasis on international trade and the global economy. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ECON2292 Microeconomics (3 Credits)
This course is an analysis of current United States and world policies, issues and problems using some basic principles of economics with special emphasis on decision making by individuals and firms. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

EFRT100 Early Clinical (0 Credits)


ELEC1000 Electrical Motor/Generation and Distribution (3 Credits)
This course will cover skills essential to understand the electrical theory of operation, wiring, troubleshooting, maintenance and repair of motors, conversion equipment, generation, electrical distribution,transformes used in the Commercial, Industrial and Wind Industry. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC1001 Introduction to Solar Photovoltaic (3 Credits)
This course is a general introduction to photovoltaic energy, systems and components and how they work together. Also discussed will be terminology associated with solar energy and the technicians. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Solar Photovoltaic (NABCEP). Prerequisite: Acceptance in the Solar Photovoltaic Program. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC1002 Solar Photovoltaic Safety (1 Credits)
This course covers workplace safety practices and procedures for the solar industry. Proper techniques for climbing, working overhead safety, and working with mechanical and electrical systems will be covered. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Solar Photovoltaic (NABCEP). Prerequisite: Acceptance in the Solar Photovoltaic Program. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

ELEC1003 Site Evaluation and Solar Components (3 Credits)
This course will provide an understanding of the process of site evaluation and solar components. Panel construction, operation, and maintenance characteristics will also be covered. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Solar Photovoltaic (NABCEP). Prerequisites: ELEC 1702, ELEC 1001, and ELEC 1002. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC1004 Photovoltaic energy Storage and Power Supplies (3 Credits)
This course will provide an understanding of energy storage methods. Also discussed are the two primary types of power conversion systems. Battery, controller, and inverters types and systems will also be covered. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Solar Photovoltaic (NABCEP). Prerequisites: ELEC 1702, ELEC 1001, and ELEC 1002. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC1005 Photovoltaic Sizing/Calculations and Installation (3 Credits)
This course will provide the necessary skills and knowledge to properly size PV systems based on required electrical loads. In addition, this course will provide specific calculations based on electrical loads and other environmental factors (i.e. ambient temperature) of the solar panels. Wiring installation based on NEC codes will also be discussed. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Solar Photovoltaic (NABCEP). Prerequisites: ELEC 1003 and ELEC 1004. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC1006 Photovoltaic Permitting, Commissioning, Troubleshooting, and Maintenance (4 Credits)
This course will cover basic photovoltaic technology that is essential to understanding over all layout, installation, operation, maintenance, troubleshooting and repair of electrical, electro-mechanical, and electronic equipment and systems. This course also covers permitting, inspection, and building codes and regulations. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Solar Photovoltaic (NABCEP). Prerequisites: ELEC 1003 and ELEC 1004. (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC1702 Theory I (4 Credits)
This course covers the basic concepts of electricity including direct current. The basic study of atomic structure, current and voltage, power conductors, electromagnetic and insulators, and resistance, applications of test meters, circuit theorems, magnetic, and terminology are also covered. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC1703 Electrical Lab (2 Credits)
This course covers the basic concepts of electricity, direct current circuits, and alternating current circuits. The basic study of atomic structure, current and voltage, power conductors, electromagnetic and insulators, and resistance, Ohm's Law, Electromagnetic Field (EMF) source, series and parallel circuit construction and analysis, applications of test meters, circuit theorems, magnetic, and terminology are also included. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC1705 Electricial Theory II (4 Credits)
This course is an introduction to alternating current (AC) theory including proper use of electrical formulas for algebra and trigonometry that are frequently used in the electrical industry. These include such formulas as voltage drop, power factor, efficiency, and transformer rations. Proper use of meters and oscilloscopes will also be covered. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). Prerequisite: ELEC 1702. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC1707 Electrical Safety (1 Credits)
This course introduces safety and laboratory practices that are common to the electrical trade. Accident prevention and discussion of unsafe acts in the electrical occupational field are covered along with proper personal protective equipment (PPE) that is required. Since safety is a paramount importance, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) rules are includes as they pertain to the electrical industry. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

ELEC1713 Construction Blueprint Reading (2 Credits)
This course covers the plans, symbols, and specifications for construction and design of residential and commercial buildings. Residential and commercial service calculations are included. National Electrical Code (NEC) is included in all discussions. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC1714 Conduit (3 Credits)
This course covers conduit applications (basic to advanced), types of conduit systems and the bending and threading of each type of raceway. Benfield methods and National Electrical Code rules are used in all projects. Knowledge of the proper ways to install conductors and how to properly make the numerous types of bends skillfully help advance a person's career in the electrical trades. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC1715 Residential I (5 Credits)
This course covers applications of blueprint reading skills, the National Electrical Code (NEC) and residential wiring procedures applicable to single family dwellings. It will also include an introduction to wiring procedures applicable to multi-family dwellings. This course will include single family services and special circuits. Prerequisites: ELEC 1702. (5 Cr - 2 lect, 3 lab)

ELEC1723 Residential II (5 Credits)
This course covers residential wiring and the National Electric Code (NEC). Included are the special wiring and services used today in single and multi-family dwellings. An understanding of low voltage, communications, special appliances, heating and cooling, and the calculations that are taught in this course are needed in the electrical trades. (5 Cr - 3 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC1728 NEC I (4 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the National Electrical Code (NEC), as well as Minnesota State Board of Electricity laws and how to use them. Knowledge of the NEC and laws and rules for electricians is the foundation of a career in the electrical industry as all electrical installations must comply with both. The most current versions are used. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC1730 Alarm and Communications (1 Credits)
The Alarm and Communication Low Voltage course will cover licensing information from how to fill out the necessary application materials to preparing for the state examination. The National Electrical Code (NEC) and related electrical theory necessary to help you prepare for the state examination will be covered. The course will be delivered at an introductory level. Textbook will be the "National Electrical Code" supplemented with handout material. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

ELEC1746 Power Electronics (3 Credits)
This course introduces the basic theory and operation of solid state semi-conductor devices that are used in industrial electrical/electronic circuits. Electrical test meters and oscilloscopes are used in this class to enhance understanding of the basic electrical and electronic projects. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC2701 Electric Motors I (3 Credits)
This course covers the various construction characteristics and uses of alternating current (AC) single-phase and three-phase motors. Also covered in this course is recognition, installation, and troubleshooting of all common AC motors for National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements and calculations. Prerequisites: ELEC 1705 (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC2702 Structured Wiring (2 Credits)
This course covers communications and other low-voltage inside wiring techniques and principles. Also covered are different types of cable and wire associated with these systems along with National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC2703 Motor Controls I (3 Credits)
This course introduces the basic construction and operation of motor control equipment, including different types of electrical diagrams, protective devices, application and connection of controls for single-phase and three-phase alternating current (AC) motors. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). Prerequisite: ELEC 1706. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC2704 House Wiring Project (Structured Wiring) (1 Credits)
Structured wiring principles and techniques for low voltage, data and communication and fiber optic cabling. Prereq: None. (1Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC2706 Motor Controls II (3 Credits)
This course covers additional applications and operation of specialized control equipment for single-phase and three-phase motors such as reduced voltage starters, frequency drives, and braking devices. Prerequisite: ELEC 2703 (3 Cr 1 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC2710 House Wiring Project I (Rough-in) (0 Credits)
This course covers the rough-in wiring of an actual house. Topics and activities include layout, National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements, installation of boxes, boring holes, installation of wires and low voltage cabling, main and temporary service installation. Prerequisites: ELEC 1707, ELEC 1715, and ELEC 1723. (.5 Cr - 0 lect, .5 lab)

ELEC2711 House Wiring Project II (Finish) (0 Credits)
This course covers the finish wiring of the house. Topics and activities include installation of wiring devices and light fixtures, terminating circuits in the panelboard, and energizing all circuits, as well as troubleshooting if necessary. Prerequisite: ELEC 2710. (.5 Cr - 0 lect, .5 lab)

ELEC2717 Transformers (2 Credits)
This course covers the operation and installation of single and three-phase distribution and instrument transformers. The construction, markings and theory of induction will be covered. Multi voltage single phase transformer and all the three phase connections will also being covered in depth as will current and potential transformers. Prerequisites: ELEC 1701 and ELEC 1705. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC2721 Industrial Wiring (2 Credits)
This course covers transformer and motor selection, metering, busways, fusing, grounding systems, power factor correction, distribution and special systems used for industrial wiring. The subject matter is covered in specific courses other than industrial wiring. Prerequisites: ELEC 1714, ELEC 2701, ELEC 2703, and ELEC 2717. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC2723 Electric Motors II (2 Credits)
This course covers the types, construction, operation, installation, and maintenance of direct current (DC) motors and generators. These motors and generators are studied and connected, and the operating characteristics are observed and compared. Prerequisite: ELEC 1702. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC2745 PLC I (3 Credits)
This course covers the basic theory, operation, installation and practical application of programmable logic controllers (PLC). Ladder logic, symbols, creating and downloading of programs are also covered. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). Prerequisite: ELEC 2703 (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

ELEC2750 PLC II (3 Credits)
This course provides the student additional applications of programmable logic controllers (PLC) with emphasis on advanced programming techniques and intelligent input/output modules. The operation of PLC internal timers and timers will be covered in depth. Data manipulation, sequencers and internal math functions will also be covered. Labeling, documentation and maintenance are also part of the curriculum. Prerequisite: ELEC 2745. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC2780 Commerical I (3 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the materials and design aspects of commercial wiring and re-enforces residential wiring skills by wiring a new house. Topics included are installation of transformers, raceways, services, non-metallic cable, boxes, wiring devices, fixtures, residential code requirements and design requirements for conduit layouts, circuit protection, and display lighting. Prerequisites: ELEC 1705, ELEC 1707, ELEC 1714, ELEC 1715, and ELEC 1723. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC2785 Commercial II (3 Credits)
This course covers additional materials and design aspects of commercial wiring. Load schedules, fusing, special outlets, lighting, lamp installation and selection are also covered. Prerequisites: ELEC 2780 (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELEC2790 NEC II (3 Credits)
This course introduces the National Electrical Code (NEC) that pertains to all types of raceways, boxes, motors, motor control, air-conditioning equipment, transformers, and generators. Also covered are areas of special occupancies, special equipment, special conditions, communication systems, tables in Chapter Nine and the annex to the NEC. Prerequisite: ELEC 1728 (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

ELIM1001 Electrical/Mechanical Safety (2 Credits)
This course includes workplace safety practices and procedures for the wind industry. Proper techniques for climbing, overhead safety, and working with mechanical and electrical systems are covered. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

EMER1200 Emergency Medical Technician (7 Credits)
The primary focus of the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) is to provide basic emergency medical care and transportation for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system (EMS). EMTs perform interventions with the basic equipment typically found on an ambulance. This course will provide the basic knowledge and skills necessary to provide patient care and transportation. Upon successful completion, participants are eligible for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technician¿s exam. (7 Cr - 3 lect, 4 lab)

EMER1210 Emergency Medical Care/First Responder (3 Credits)
This course fulfills Minnesota Emergency Medical Services Regulatory Board (EMSRB) requirements for First Responder and is recognized by the Police Officers Standards and Training (POST) for the state of Minnesota. Care of the sick and injured prior to Emergency Medical Service (EMS) arrival, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)/automated external defibrillation (A.E.D.), triage, use of emergency care equipment and Patient Disentanglement are included. Upon successful completion, students may be recognized as a Minnesota First Responder. (3 Cr - 2 lec, 1 lab)

EMER1300 Coaching the Emergency Vehicle Operator--Ambulance (0 Credits)
In this course student ambulance operators learn practical, defensive driving techniques focusing on the operator's ability to read traffic conditions, act and re-act accordingly, and prevent collisions in both emergency and non-emergency situations. This certification in conjunction with Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) or First Responder certification offers students the opportunity to enter into the workforce with the tools needed to be successful and keep communities safe. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

EMER1400 International Trauma Life Support (ITLS) (1 Credits)
This course is a nationally recognized training program for prehospital providers on the care of trauma patients. This course is designed to recognize mechanisms of injury assessment, perform critical interventions, package, and transport the trauma victim. This course is a Certified International Trauma Life Support (ITLS) Provider course using only certified ITLS instructors who teach the course using the guidelines and under the auspices of the ITLS organization. Prerequisites: Instructor approval or minimum of First Responder Certification or equivalent of NURS 2010 and NURS 2020. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

EMER1405 Basic Cardiac Rhythm Interpretation (1 Credits)
Basic Cardiac Rhythm Interpretation teaches the fundamentals of cardiac anatomy and electrophysiology, and the understanding and recognition of the rules and mechanisms of basic cardiac rhythms and arrhythmias. This course is designed as an Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) preparatory course. Prerequisites: Completion of professional nursing program, NURS 2040, emergency medical technician course, EMER 1200, licensed MD, RN, Paramedic, Respiratory Therapist, or special permission granted from course coordinator. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

EMER1410 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) (1 Credits)
This American Heart Association (AHA) course allows health care providers to enhance their skills in the treatment of the adult victim of a cardiac arrest or other cardiopulmonary emergencies. This course will emphasize the importance of basic life support CPR to patient survival; the integration of effective basic life support with advanced cardiovascular life support interventions; and the importance of effective team interaction and communication during resuscitation. This course is designed for medical providers such as physicians, nurses, emergency medical technicians, paramedics, respiratory therapists, and other professionals who may respond to a cardiovascular emergency. Prerequisites: Current AHA Basic Life Support Certification, and completion of EMER 1405, professional nursing program, NURS 2040, licensed MD, RN, Paramedic, Respiratory Therapist, or special permission granted from course coordinator. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

EMER1420 Pediatric Trauma Life Support for Prehospital Care Providers (1 Credits)
This course continues the training of the International Trauma Life Support (ITLS) Basic and Advanced courses with an emphasis on understanding and responding to trauma in children. This course teaches the proper assessment, stabilization, and packaging of pediatric trauma patients. It also highlights techniques for communicating with young patients and their parents. This course is a Certified ITLS Pediatric Provider taught only by certified ITLS instructors using the guidelines and under the auspices of the ITLS organization. Prerequisites: EMER 1400. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

EMER1430 Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) (1 Credits)
This American Heart Association (AHA) course is based on scientific evidence from the 2005 AHA Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiac Care (ECC). The goal of the Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) course is to aid the pediatric healthcare provider in developing the knowledge and skills necessary to efficiently and effectively manage critically ill infants and children leading to improved outcomes. Skills taught include recognition and treatment of infants and children at risk for cardiopulmonary arrest, the systematic approach to pediatric assessment, effective respiratory management, defibrillation and synchronized cardioversion, intraosseous access and fluid bolus administration, and effective resuscitation team dynamics. This course is designed for pediatricians, emergency physicians, family physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, paramedics, emergency medical technicians, respiratory therapists, and other healthcare providers who initiate and direct advanced life support in pediatric emergencies. Prerequisites: EMER 1405, completion of professional nursing program, NURS 2040, licensed MD, RN, Paramedic, Respiratory Therapist, or instructor approval. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

EMER1440 Pediatric Emergency Assessment, Recognition, and Stabilization (PEARS) (0 Credits)
This course prepares students to assess, categorize, decide and act early to stabilize the child. The main focus of Pediatric Emergency Assessment, Recognition, and Stabilization (PEARS) is prevention, and specifically the assessment, recognition and stabilization of pediatric victims at risk of severe cardiopulmonary distress. Guidelines established by the American Heart Association (AHA) are utilized. Upon successful completion of this course, students receive an AHA Completion Card. This course is designed for healthcare providers who infrequently see critically ill children. It is not intended for those credentialed for advanced pediatric skills that routinely provide pediatric care. Prerequisites: Minimum of First Responder Certification, EMER 1200, EMER 1210 or equivalent of NURS 2010, NURS 2020 and instructor approval. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

EMER1500 Ambulance Operations (1 Credits)
This course is designed to provide knowledge to students in ambulance operation, lifting & moving patients, documentation, radio communication, legal issues, scene size-up and safety. Along with classroom activities, students will perform hands on activities in a simulated environment. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment or completion of EMER 1200. (1 Cr - .5 lect, .5 lab)

ENAP0011 Writing and Grammar Level I (4 Credits)
This course focuses on basic writing skills for non-native English speakers. The student produces basic sentence patterns and progresses to a single paragraph format. The student learns to use computers to improve writing and grammar skills. (4 credits - 4 cr. lect., 0 lab)

ENAP0012 Reading Level I (4 Credits)
This course focuses on developing a basic ability for non-native English speakers to comprehend a variety of written material. The student learns to identify the topic and main idea in short texts. The student develops vocabulary learning strategies. (4 credits- 4 cr. lect., 0 lab)

ENAP0013 Listening and Speaking Level I (4 Credits)
This course focuses on English pronunciation rules and strategies for participating in teacher-directed listening and speaking tasks. The student learns to be an active listener by responding appropriately to questions and simple commands. (4 credits- 4 cr. lect., 0 lab)

ENAP0021 Writing and Grammar II (4 Credits)
This course focuses on basic writing skills for non-native English speakers. Grammar, writing fluency, self-editing, and ability to write short paragraphs are included in this course. Students learn to use computers to improve their writing and editing skills. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0022 Reading II (4 Credits)
This course focuses on increasing ability for non-native English speakers to comprehend a variety of written material. Students learn to skim for main ideas and scan for specific information. The course develops the ability to understand vocabulary through context clues and a dictionary. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0023 Listening & Speaking II (4 Credits)
This course, for non-native English speakers, develops an awareness of pronunciation rules in English and strategies for interaction in real-life speaking situations. Class activities may include video/audio tapes, lectures, demonstrations, dictations, interviews, group work, and/or oral presentations. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0024 Introduction to US College & Culture (1 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce the non-native speaker of English and international students to United States culture and college life. Topics will include aspects of United States culture and information and resources available to make a successful adjustment to college in the United States. This course is mandatory for international students. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0025 English for the Workplace (3 Credits)
This course for non-native English speakers will develop general language skills and workplace understanding needed to function successfully in the United States workplace. Lessons will address common workplace topics and key issues that students may encounter. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0031 Writing and Grammar III (4 Credits)
This course for non-native English speakers focuses on practicing and developing basic writing skills by applying them to a variety of situations i.e. grammar, writing fluency, self-editing ability, ability to write short essays and use computers to edit and revise essays. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or successful completion of ENAP 0021. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0032 Reading III (4 Credits)
This course for non-native English speakers introduces the skills and strategies necessary for understanding a variety of written material. Students learn to identify main and supporting details in non-fiction, increase reading rate and comprehension, and analyze features of fiction. In addition, students build vocabulary using a variety of strategies. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval of successful completion of ENAP 0022. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0033 Listening & Speaking III (4 Credits)
This course provides the knowledge and practice necessary to further improve student's listening, speaking and pronunciation skills in English in order to help a non-native English speaker be more successful in future academic courses. They will work on these skills through activities such as listening to lectures, tapes, and video, taking notes in English, taking dictations, participating in discussions, doing interviews, giving presentations and doing exercises in the language lab. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0035 English for the Workplace (3 Credits)
This course is designed to help the worker to advance within the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on understanding American work culture and functional language needed for workplace tasks. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0041 Writing and Grammar IV (4 Credits)
This course develops higher-level writing skills in a variety of situations to students whose native language is not English. This class focuses on grammar, writing fluency, self-editing ability, and learning to write essays of varying lengths and genres. Students practice to writing skills through extensive writing and word processing. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0031. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0042 Reading IV (4 Credits)
This course develops the student's ability to understand a variety of written materials. Students learn to identify main ideas and supporting details in non-fiction, increase reading rate and comprehension, and analyze features of fiction. In addition, students increase vocabulary using a variety of strategies. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0032. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0051 Writing and Grammar V (4 Credits)
This course focuses on providing advanced writing students whose native language is not English with the instruction necessary to understand and use aspects of grammar, style, and organization that cause unique problems for non-native English speakers. Students learn a variety of writing skills and strategies necessary to succeed in entry-level college writing courses. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0041. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0101 Academic Skills Lab (1 Credits)
The Academic Skills Lab is designed to increase college preparedness and student accomplishment with targeted assessment in specific academic areas. The Lab identifies locations of strengths and weaknesses for students and then builds a personalized tutorial with interactive instruction providing practice for the students with instant feedback. This 32 hour program is designed to be self-paced and provide a flexible schedule for students to implement their own study plan with guidance from the course instructor. Prerequisites: Appropriate scores below 63 on the Accuplacer assessment and/ or instructor approval. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

ENAP0102 Academic Skills Lab (2 Credits)
The Academic Skills Lab is designed to increase college preparedness and student accomplishment with targeted assessment in specific academic areas. The Lab identifies locations of strengths and weaknesses for students and then builds a personalized tutorial with interactive instruction providing practice for the students with instant feedback. This 64 hour program is designed to be self-paced and provide a flexible schedule for students to implement their own study plan with guidance from the course instructor. Prerequisites: Appropriate scores below 63 on the Accuplacer assessment and/ or instructor approval. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

ENAP0111 Writing and Grammar Level I (4 Credits)
This course focuses on basic writing skills for non-native English speakers. The student produces basic sentence patterns and progresses to a paragraph format. The student learns to use computers to improve writing and grammar skills. (4 credits - 4 cr. lect., 0 lab)

ENAP0112 Reading Level I (4 Credits)
This course continues to reinforce the basic ability of non-native English speakers to comprehend a variety of written material. The student learns to identify the topic and main idea in longer texts. The student continues to develop vocabulary learning strategies. (4 credits- 4 cr. lect., 0 lab)

ENAP0113 Listening and Speaking Level I (4 Credits)
This course continues to develop an awareness of English pronunciation rules and strategies for participating in teacher-directed listening and speaking tasks. The student progresses in active listening by responding appropriately to questions and simple commands. (4 credits - 4 cr. lect., 0 lab)

ENAP0121 Writing and Grammar II (4 Credits)
This course is a continuation of ENAP 0021 and focuses on basic writing skills. Students improve their grammar, writing fluency, self-editing and ability to write short paragraphs. Students learn to use computers to improve writing and editing skills. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0122 Reading II (4 Credits)
This course continues the content that focuses on increasing your ability to comprehend a variety of written material. Students learn to skim for main ideas and scan for specific information. The course develops the ability to understand vocabulary through context clues and a dictionary. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0022. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0123 Listening & Speaking II (4 Credits)
This course continues content from ENAP 0023 and develops an awareness of pronunciation rules in English and learning strategies for interaction in real-life speaking situations. Class activities will include video/audio tapes, lectures, demonstrations, dictations, interviews, group work, and oral presentations. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0023. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0131 Writing and Grammar III (4 Credits)
This course continues content from ENAP 0023 and develops an awareness of pronunciation rules in English and learning strategies for interaction in real-life speaking situations. Class activities will include video/audio tapes, lectures, demonstrations, dictations, interviews, group work, and oral presentations. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0023. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0132 Reading III (4 Credits)
This course continues work on skills and strategies necessary for understanding a variety of written materials especially for non-native speakers of English. Students learn to identify main and supporting details in non-fiction, increase reading rate and comprehension, and analyze features of fiction. In addition, students build vocabulary using a variety of strategies. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0032. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0133 Listening & Speaking III (4 Credits)
This course continues content from ENAP 0033 and provides the knowledge and practice necessary to further improve students' listening, speaking and pronunciation skills in English. Students work on these skills through activities such as listening to lectures, tapes, and video, taking notes in English, taking dictations, participating in discussions, doing interviews, giving presentations and doing exercises in the language lab. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0033. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0141 Writing and Grammar IV (4 Credits)
This course continues content from ENAP 0041 and develops higher level writing skills in a variety of situations for students whose native language is not English. This class focuses on grammar, writing fluency, self editing ability, and learning to write essays of varying lengths and genres. Students practice writing skills through extensive writing and word processing. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0031 and ENAP 0041. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0142 Reading IV (4 Credits)
This course continues to build the student's ability to understand a variety of written materials. Students learn to identify main ideas and supporting details in non-fiction, increase their reading rate and comprehension, and analyze features of fiction. In addition, students increase vocabulary using a variety of strategies. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0042. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENAP0151 Writing and Grammar V (4 Credits)
This course continues the focus of providing advanced writing students whose native language is not English with the ability to understand and use aspects of grammar, style, and organization that cause unique problems for non-native English speakers. Students learn a variety of writing skills and strategies necessary to succeed in entry-level college writing courses. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement score or instructor approval or completion of ENAP 0051. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL0950 College Prep English Level I (3 Credits)
This course is the first level of a two-level sequence of College Prep English and is designed to promote good writing through good reading. Students will learn fundamental reading and writing skills that will prepare them for College Prep English II. Prerequisites: Appropriate Accuplacer score. This course does not meet distribution requirements and will not count as credits toward graduation. A grade of C or higher is required to enroll in ENGL 0960. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL0960 College Prep English Level II (3 Credits)
This course is the second level of a two-level sequence of College Prep English. Students will learn advanced reading and writing skills that will prepare them for Freshman English and other college-level classes. Students will learn to analyze and interpret a variety of reading materials of college-level difficulty. They will also have several opportunities to integrate and apply critical reading and writing skills through the development of short essays. Prerequisites: Appropriate Accuplacer score or a grade of C or higher in College Prep English I. This course does not meet distribution requirements and will not count as credits toward graduation. A grade of C or higher is required to enroll in ENGL 1101. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL1101 Freshman English (3 Credits)
This is an introductory college writing course designed to help students develop effective writing skills for college level work. Students learn to generate ideas and organize them into unified, coherent essays. Methods of instruction vary, but most sections combine individual conferences and peer review with regular class meetings. Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 0960 or appropriate placement score. MnTC (Goals 1/CM and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL1103 Introduction to Literature (3 Credits)
This is an introductory literature course designed to increase a student's critical and analytical skills in reading. Included is a study of literature by genre: the short story, drama, poetry and the novel. Emphasis in the selections is on American and English literature although some works in translation are read. Critical and interpretive papers are required. MnTC (Goals 6/ HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL1104 Exposition and Argumentation (3 Credits)
This second semester composition course is designed as a continuation of ENGL 1101. It teaches the skills needed to write clear and coherent essays using different modes of expository prose such as process, comparison and contrast, classification, and definition. It will culminate in the study of argumentative writing in which the student learns to defend a position and argue a thesis with reason and evidence. Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 MnTC (Goal 1/CM and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL1105 Writing From Library Sources (3 Credits)
This is a second semester composition course focused on the writing of an academic research paper. Students learn how to employ the resources of an academic library and how to cite those sources in a fully documented analytical/interpretive term paper. Prerequisites: ENGL 1101. MnTC (Goals 1/CM and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL1106 Introduction to Journalism (3 Credits)
This is a second semester composition course based upon writing journalistic pieces and researching topics related to the practice and craft of journalism. Students will learn ways of interviewing and writing for various media, including print, broadcast, and online formats, study ethical issues facing journalists, and explore diversity issues specific to journalism. Students will also develop an understanding of First Amendment rights related to Freedom of the Press, the Freedom of Information Act, and the special role journalism plays in a democracy. Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 MnTC (Goals 1/CM and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL1113 Creative Writing: Nonfiction (1 Credits)
This is an introductory writing course in creative nonfiction. In lecture/workshop format, students examine models, then write and revise essays drawn from personal experience, memory, observation and reflection. Writing is shared in small groups and/or individual conferences. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and Goal 7/HD); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL1115 Creative Writing: Fiction (1 Credits)
This is an introductory writing course in creative fiction. In lecture/workshop format, students examine fiction models, noting technique for creating believable character, dialogue and conflict. Students then create one or several works of fiction. Writing is shared in small groups and/or individual conferences. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and Goal 7/HD); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL1124 Newspaper Activity IV (1 Credits)
Newspaper Activity IV

ENGL1131 Fiction (3 Credits)
This course is the analytic study of short stories and novels. British and American authors are emphasized, though some literature in translation is read. Focus is on how to read narrative fiction with maximum understanding and critical judgment. MnTC (Goal 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL1132 Ethnic Literature (3 Credits)
This course explores literary works from a variety of American ethnic groups. Focus is on the text as a work of art created by an ethnic writer. Students will examine ways in which the writer's ethnicity may influence the text, the ways the text reflects/critiques/endorses the writer's ethnic group, and the ways the text reflects/critiques/endorses the dominant culture. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and Goal 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL1140 Language and Mind (3 Credits)
Linguistics is the scientific study of language in all its facets, its structure, its use, its history, and its place in society. This course is a non-technical introduction to and selective survey of the traditional core areas of the field. In studying these areas, the students will become acquainted with some of the most basic and important properties of the human language. A major focus of this course will be to relate these properties of human language to questions of human nature in general, especially regarding the nature of the human mind. In exploring this question, the students will be introduced to some leading ideas of modern cognitive science, and recent findings on the relationship between language and the brain will be briefly surveyed. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

ENGL2000 Creative Writing: Poetry and Prose (3 Credits)
This is an introductory writing course in creative prose and poetry. In lecture/workshop format, students examine and evaluate creative writing models and peer writing, noting word choice, rhythm, character development and conflict. Students will create a portfolio of their writing to be shared in small groups and/or individual conferences. Students will also participate in the organization and facilitation of a creative arts journal open to all Riverland students. MnTC (Goals 6 /HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL2191 Seminar in American Studies (1 Credits)
This seminar course will make interdisciplinary connections between the American history and American literature sequence courses. Other disciplines such as music and art will be incorporated whenever possible to make cultural connections between the content of the courses. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL2192 Seminar in American Studies (1 Credits)
This seminar course will make interdisciplinary connections between the American history and American literature sequence courses. Other disciplines such as music and art will be incorporated whenever possible to make cultural connections between the content of the courses. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL2231 Modern Literature (3 Credits)
This course explores literary developments from World War I to the present, drawing readings from a variety of genres and cultures. Emphasis will be placed not only on analysis and understanding of the texts, but on the social, historical, cultural, and psychological factors that influence and shape literature of the 20th century. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL2241 American Literature I (3 Credits)
This course explores developments in American Literature between 1492 and 1865. Students will explore both historical and formal developments affecting literature of this period, as well as similarities/differences among the works covered. Specific issues addressed may include early written representations of America, the influence of Puritanism on American writers, important documents of the Federalist period, and the American Romantic movement, including Transcendentalism. MNTC (Goals 6/HUand 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL2242 American Literature II (3 Credits)
This course explores developments in American Literature between 1865 and the present. Students will explore both historical and formal developments affecting literature of this period, as well as the similarities/differences among the works covered. Some of the specific issues addressed include the rise of Realism and Naturalism, Regionalism and Post-Modernism. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ENGL2251 English Literature (3 Credits)
This course requires students to read, understand, and appreciate the different periods of English literature. The significant works of major English authors from the time of Chaucer to the present are studied. Authors include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, Pope, Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Yeats, Joyce, Eliot, and Auden. Terminology associated with literary analysis will allow students the insight into the human experience through literature. Critical reading, thinking, and writing skills are emphasized. Previous course work in literature is recommended. MNTC (Goals 6/HU and 9 EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 Lab)

ENGL2255 Introduction to Shakespeare (3 Credits)
This course requires students to read, discuss, and analyze some of Shakespeare's major works, including comedies, histories, tragedies, romances, and poetry. Emphasis will be placed on the historical context in which the works were created (including Elizabethan dramatic conventions), the aesthetic value and power of his work, and his continuing influence on literature and drama. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

ESCI1000 Earth Science (3 Credits)
This course covers the development of the earth throughout its history and relates to processes observed today. Special emphasis is placed on the study of volcanoes, earthquakes, geologic structures, and various types of rocks. Also studied in the course is the interdependence between geologic processes and the environment with special emphasis given to how people cope with changing environmental conditions. Hands-on study of various rocks, examination of various geological models, etc, provide in-class, lab-like experience for students of this course. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMA2100 Fundamentals of Financial Management- Risk Management Emphasis (3 Credits)
This course enhances decision-making skills relating to business risk management. The student further investigates tools available to their business that would be effective in reducing potential risk for operation. Emphasis is placed on research risk management options that meet business, family, and personal needs. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMA2101 Applications in Financial Management - Risk Management Emphasis (3 Credits)
This course applies concepts in financial management that can be used in the development of a business risk management program. The student implements risk management tools that will assist in meeting business, family, and personal needs. (3 Cr - lect, 0 lab)

FBMA2110 Fundamentals of Financial Mgmt (3 Credits)
This course enables students to identify the elements necessary to evaluate and create a strategic plan for the business. Students determine uses for the strategic plan today for present and future. Students develop plan to locate team members necessary for strategic plan creation. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMA2111 Applications in Financial Mgmt - Strategic Planning (3 Credits)
This course provides practical application of strategic planning skills. Application skills are practiced and applied to the business and business plan. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMA2120 Fundamentals of Financial Management-Business Plan Emphasis (3 Credits)
This course provides practical application of the business plan. Application skills are practiced as the business plan is prepared and implemented. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMA2121 Applications in Financial Mgmt-Business Plan Emphasis (3 Credits)
This course provides the necessary instruction to put together and implement a business plan for the farm business. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMA2130 Directed Study - Decision Making (2 Credits)
This course examines the individual, family, and farm business decision making process. Upgrading and improving decision making resources, tools, and skills are emphasized. This course leads to critically analyze information, applications, and implications of decision making as it relates to the situation. Students evaluate the decision making process. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMA2131 Directed Study - Communications (2 Credits)
This course assists the student in acquiring and developing a higher level of communication skills. Students review and evaluate various methods and techniques in communication and relating to individuals in both the public and private sector. Students use information in formulating an effective communication method and style. Additional course content may include student initiated or group activities. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMA2132 Directed Study - Modern Agricultural Technology (2 Credits)
This course explores modern agricultural technological changes and determines if they fit into an individual's farming operation. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMA2200 Current Issues in Farm Business Management (1 Credits)
This course assists students to develop skills in business management. Students investigate and apply tools that are effective in reducing potential risk, performing strategic planning, and revising business plans in farm business operations. Emphasis is placed on the research of business management alternatives to meet business and personal needs. This course may be repeated as needed. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1112 Foundation for Farm Business Management (4 Credits)
This course is an overview of the Farm Business Management Program. Goal setting, self and business assessment, record keeping, and business projections to provide the foundation for personal and business management progress are introducted. Current issues affecting business management are an integral part of the course.(4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1121 Preparation for Farm Business Management (4 Credits)
This course will take the student through a step by step procedure to close out a complete year of farm business records. This course will emphasize cash and liabilities accuracy. A completed business and enterprise analysis will be the course focus. Prereq: None. (4Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 4 other)

FBMT1122 Implementing the System Management Plan (4 Credits)
This course continues to build on the foundation of farm business management. The student completes a farm business financial and enterprise analysis. Sound financial record keeping is an integral component. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1131 Managing and Modifying Farm System Data (4 Credits)
This course prepares students to refine farm business data system and assist in applying year-end procedures for farm business analysis. Students improve accuracy in farm enterprise analysis, tax planning, data filing, and cash and liabilities checks. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1132 Interpreting and Using Farm System Data (4 Credits)
This course provides an opportunity for the students to view the farm business and its various components through the application of farm and personal balance sheets. Farm, personal, and managerial inventories, enterprise reports and historical data are also covered. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1170 Introduction to Farm Commodities Marketing (3 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to the various methods and tools to market farm commodities. Costs connected to commodity production and storage are emphasized. Various methods of marketing are covered. (3 Cr -3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1171 Directed Study - Intro to Farm Commodity Marketing (1 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to farm commodities marketing. Calculating breakeven prices and other production parameters are covered. A brief examination of cash forward contracts, hedging, and options are included. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1172 Directed Study - Intro to Farm Commodity Marketing (1 Credits)
This course continues the introduction to farm commodities marketing. It includes calculating breakeven prices and other production parameters. Further examination of cash forward contracts, hedging, and options are covered. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1173 Directed Study - Introduction to Farm Commodity Marketing (2 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to the various methods and tools to market farm commodities. Marketing techniques and forms of sales are explored. Costs associated with marketing are studied and compared. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1180 Applying Commodity Marketing Fundamentals (3 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to the various methods and tools to market farm commodities. Marketing techniques and forms of sales are explored. Costs associated with marketing are studied and compared. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1181 Directed Study - Applying Commodity Marketing Fundamentals (1 Credits)
This course provides the student with the opportunity to apply marketing methods and tools to individual farming operations. Commodity marketing is the main driver of profitability on a farm operation. Basic skills in this area are critical to farm success. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1182 Directed Study - Applying Commodity Marketing Fundamentals (1 Credits)
This course provides the student with the opportunity to apply marketing methods and tools to individual farming operation. Commodity marketing is the main driver of profitability on a farm operation. Basic skills in this area are critical to farm success. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1183 Directed Study - Applying Commodity Marketing Fundamentals (2 Credits)
This course enhances the student's ability to apply marketing methods and tools to individual farming operation. Commodity marketing is the main driver of profitability on a farm operation. Comprehensive skills in commodity marketing are critical to farm success. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1190 Evaluating Farm Commodity Marketing Tools (3 Credits)
This course allows students to evaluate the various farm marketing tools and to select the tool appropriate to the present marketing situation. Students determine production and storage costs as they relate to cash flow. This information is used to make profitable marketing decisions. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1191 Directed Study - Evaluating Farm Commodity Marketing Tools (1 Credits)
This course allows students to evaluate the various farm marketing tools and to select the tool appropriate to the present marketing situation. Students determine production and storage costs as they relate to cash flow. This information is used to make profitable marketing decisions. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1192 Directed Study - Evaluating Farm Commodity Marketing Tools (1 Credits)
This course allows students to evaluate the various farm marketing tools and to select the tool appropriate to the present marketing situation. Students determine production and storage costs as they relate to cash flow. This information is used to make profitable marketing decisions. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1193 Directed Study - Evaluating Farm Commodity Marketing Tools (2 Credits)
This course allows students to evaluate the various farm marketing tools and to select the tool appropriate to the present marketing situation. Students determine production and storage costs as they relate to cash flow. This information is used to make profitable marketing decisions. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1211 Introduction to Farm Business Management (4 Credits)
This course introduces basic farm business management concepts. Students study the farm management planning cycle and develop an understanding of its relationship to family and farm business goal setting, cash and enterprise accounting principles, and tax planning.(4 Cr - lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1213 Managing A Farm System in A Global Economy (2 Credits)
This course focuses on achieving awareness of the development of agricultural policies and practices throughout the world. The impact of these policies and practices on the profitability and viability of farm business is assessed. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1223 Using System Analysis in Total Farm Planning (2 Credits)
This course focuses on a farm business analysis and the exploration of possible implications and/or solutions of these concepts. A systematic method to assess farm business strengths and weaknesses based on the analysis is used. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1233 Application of Productive Enterprise Information (2 Credits)
This course focuses on procedures for applying enterprise information provided by computerized analysis of farm business accounts. Students interpret and utilize computerized analysis to improve business organization and efficiency.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT1812 Foundations for Farm Business Management (4 Credits)
This course is an overview of the Farm Business Management Program. The student will be introduced to goal setting, keeping, and business projections to provide management progress. Current issues affecting business management are an integral part of the course.

FBMT2141 Interpreting and Evaluating Financial Data (4 Credits)
This course expands on preparation and evaluation of the farm business analysis. This course provides continued guidance and improvement of business record close-out procedures, the tax implications of management decisions, and guidance on monitoring a farm business and family.(4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2142 Interpreting Trends (4 Credits)
This course examines the whole farm including enterprise, balance sheet, and inventory trends. Current analysis data is compared to historical data in making farm business planning decisions. Financial ratios are used to indicate the farm financial structure. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2151 Strategies in Farm System Data Management (4 Credits)
This course helps the student focus on long term strategies necessary to maintain and enhance the farm business and personal future financial goals. The student completes the year by developing an accurate, usable business analysis.(4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2152 Integrating System Information for Financial Planning (4 Credits)
This course uses farm system information to develop a farm financial plan. Interpretation and analysis of the farm system data enhances the reliability of the farm plan. The comprehensive farm plan integrates historical trends, farm and personal goals, and financial and enterprise performance of the farm business.(4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2161 Strategies in Farm System Data Management (4 Credits)
This course assists student in preparation of improved farm system management procedures. Students evaluate and analyze several years of an improved farm system analysis.(4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2162 Refining Farm System Management (4 Credits)
This course is the culmination of activities designed to enable the student to develop and implement a comprehensive farm business strategic plan. The student will use the components of the Farm Business Management Program to develop and support a farm business strategic plan. Prereq: None. (4Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 4 other)

FBMT2170 Monitoring Farm Commodity Marketing Plans (3 Credits)
This course allows students to monitor and refine current farm commodity marketing plans. Emphasis is placed on current market conditions and pricing opportunities.(3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2173 Directed Study - Monitoring Farm Commodity Marketing Plans (2 Credits)
This course allows students to monitor and refine current farm commodity marketing plans. Emphasis is placed on current market conditions and pricing opportunities.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2180 Strategies in Farm Commodity Marketing (3 Credits)
This course focuses on farm commodities marketing strategies necessary to achieve farm business and personal goals. Marketing plan on cash flow and profitability is included. Sources of credible marketing information are explored.(3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2181 Directed Study - Strategies in Farm Commodity Marketing (1 Credits)
This course allows students to consider marketing strategies necessary to achieve farm business and personal goals. Farm success relies on accurate evaluation of various marketing tools.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2182 Directed Study - Strategies in Farm Commodity Marketing (1 Credits)
This course focuses on farm commodities marketing strategies necessary to achieve farm business and personal goals. A further examination of the marketing plan on cash flow and profitability will be included. Additional sources of credible marketing information will be explored.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2183 Directed Study - Strategies in Farm Commodity Marketing (2 Credits)
This course focuses on farm commodities marketing strategies necessary to achieve farm business and personal goals. Marketing plan on cash flow and profitability is included. Additional sources of credible marketing information are explored.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab))

FBMT2200 Special Topics - General Farm Management (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2201 Special Topics - General Farm Management (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2202 Special Topics - General Farm Management (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2203 Special Topics - General Farm Management (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2204 Special Topics - General Farm Management (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2205 Special Topics - General Farm Management (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2206 Special Topics - General Farm Management (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2207 Special Topics - General Farm Management (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2208 Special Topics - General Farm Management (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2209 Special Topics - General Farm Management (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2210 Special Topics - Marketing (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2211 Special Topics - Marketing (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2212 Special Topics - Marketing (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2213 Special Topics - Marketing (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2214 Special Topics - Marketing (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2215 Special Topics - Marketing (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2216 Special Topics - Marketing (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2217 Special Topics - Marketing (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2218 Special Topics - Marketing (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2219 Special Topics - Marketing (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2220 Special Topics - Crops (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2221 Special Topics - Crops (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2222 Special Topics - Crops (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2223 Special Topics - Crops (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2224 Special Topics - Crops (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2225 Special Topics - Crops (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2226 Special Topics - Crops (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2227 Special Topics - Crops (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2228 Special Topics - Crops (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2229 Special Topics - Crops (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2230 Special Topics - Livestock (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2231 Special Topics - Livestock (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2232 Special Topics - Livestock (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2233 Special Topics - Livestock (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2234 Special Topics - Livestock (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal and business goals and plans.(1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2235 Special Topics - Livestock (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in general farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2236 Special Topics - Livestock (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2237 Special Topics - Livestock (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2238 Special Topics - Livestock (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2239 Special Topics - Livestock (2 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Students utilize and evaluate personal business goals and plans.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2243 Financial Instruments in Farm System Management (2 Credits)
This course integrates the application of various financial instruments used in acquiring capital for use in the farm business. It also investigates the way in which both earnings and financial progress can be measured.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2253 System Plans and Projections (2 Credits)
This course enables students to integrate concepts for preparing farm system plans, and projections. Students analyze the interaction of possible implications and/or solutions of these concepts.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2263 Evaluating Farm System Programs (2 Credits)
This course focuses on providing the student with an awareness of individuals and agencies, both public and private, having expertise available to assist the farm operator to solve farm systems problems. It enables study and application of farm business evaluation concepts, and exploration of possible implications. Exact subject matter and time spent per topic vary depending on student need, location, and time.(2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2300 Computer Applications in Farm Management (2 Credits)
This course will discuss basic computer literacy, identify commonly used software, and demonstrate the uses of commonly used software. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2305 Legal Issues in Agriculture (2 Credits)
This course will examine rental contracts, liability insurance, purchase agreements, and farm transfer issues. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2310 Environmental Interactions in Agriculture (2 Credits)
This course will examine a variety of environmental issues related to agriculture and suggested ways in which to address the issues. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2315 Effective Time Management (2 Credits)
This course will explore various time management principles and their utilization within the farm business. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2320 Family Wellness and Business Relationships (2 Credits)
This course will study rural health issues and their effects on successful business ventures. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2325 Ethics in This Business Of Agriculture (2 Credits)
This course will explore the various ways in which a farm business conducts business and address their proper conduct. Prereq: None 2 credits.

FBMT2330 Business Math Principles (2 Credits)
This course will establish methods in determining inventory, calculating acreages, determining yields, calculating fixed and variable costs, and assist in understanding depreciation methods. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2335 Labor Economics and Management (2 Credits)
This course will address the use of labor in agriculture, labor work agreements, hired labor tax issues, and the evaluation of labor usage in a business. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2340 Rural Leadership (2 Credits)
This course will examine various farm organizations, the USDA, and local political systems. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2470 Analyzing Fundamental Marketing Information (3 Credits)
This course is designed to help students understand the affects of fundamental market information about supply and demand and how it affects markets and price prediction. (Prerequisite: None) (3 Cr, 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

FBMT2473 World Effects on Markets (2 Credits)
This course is designed to help students understand and recognize the effect of global production on their local commodity prices, and how to use the information when making grain sales decisions. (Prerequisite: None) (2 Cr, 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2480 Historical Price Analysis (3 Credits)
This course is designed to teach the advanced commodity marketing student to recognize past trends in commodity markets to draw conclusions as to future market trends. (Prerequisite: None) (3 Cr, 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

FBMT2483 Government Programs in Marketing (2 Credits)
This course will help students identify and use price support programs of the USDA Farm Program. (Prerequisite: None) (2 Cr, 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2490 Advanced Technical Analysis (3 Credits)
This course is designed to help students gain additional knowledge of technical information as it applies to farm commodity charts. This knowledge will allow students to further fine tune their marketing strategies to achieve personal and farm business goals. (Prerequisite: None) (3 Cr, 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

FBMT2493 Analyze Option Strategies (2 Credits)
This course is designed to help students plan and revise option marketing strategies necessary to achieve farm business and personal goals. (Prerequisite: None). (2 Cr, 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2497 Advanced Marketing Planning (2 Credits)
This course is designed to help students use the information learned from advance marketing courses to put together a comprehensive crop marketing plan for the commodities they sell. (Prerequisite: None) (2 Cr, 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

FBMT2700 Computer Applications in Business Management (2 Credits)
This course will discuss basic computer literacy, identify commonly used software, and demonstrate the uses of commonly used software.

FBMT2862 Refining Farm System Management (4 Credits)
This course is the culmination of activities designed to enable the student to develop and implement a comprehensive farm business strategic plan. The student will use the components of the Farm Business management Program to develop and support a farm business strategic plan.

FBMT2900 Special Topics - General Farm Management (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr -.5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2901 Special Topics - General Farm Management (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2902 Special Topics - General Farm Management (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr -.5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2903 Special Topics - General Farm Management (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr -.5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2904 Special Topics - General Farm Management (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2906 Special Topics - General Farm Management (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2907 Special Topics - General Farm Management (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2908 Special Topics - General Farm Management (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2909 Special Topics - General Farm Management (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in farm management. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2912 Special Topics - Marketing (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in commodity marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist them in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2913 Special Topics - Marketing (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in commodity marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist them in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2914 Special Topics - Marketing (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in commodity marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist them in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2915 Special Topics - Marketing (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in commodity marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist them in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2916 Special Topics - Marketing (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in commodity marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist them in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2917 Special Topics - Marketing (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in commodity marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist them in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2918 Special Topics - Marketing (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in commodity marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist them in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2919 Special Topics - Marketing (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in commodity marketing. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist them in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2920 Special Topics - Crops (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2921 Special Topics - Crops (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2922 Special Topics - Crops (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2923 Special Topics - Crops (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2924 Special Topics - Crops (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2925 Special Topics - Crops (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2926 Special Topics - Crops (0 Credits)
This course covers special topics of interest in crops. (Prerequisite: None). (1 Cr, 1 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

FBMT2927 Special Topics - Crops (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2928 Special Topics - Crops (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2929 Special Topics - Crops (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in crop production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2930 Special Topics - Livestock (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2931 Special Topics - Livestock (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2932 Special Topics - Livestock (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2933 Special Topics - Livestock (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2934 Special Topics - Livestock (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2935 Special Topics - Livestock (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2936 Special topics - Livestock (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2937 Special Topics - Livestock (0 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FBMT2939 Special Topics - Livestock (1 Credits)
This course focuses on an analysis of special topics in livestock production. It is designed for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business in order to assist in improving the operation.(.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FIRE1100 Firefighter I (5 Credits)
This course is designed to cover the necessary skills to perform the basic duties of firefighting including thought processes used to decide appropriate operations. This includes the duties of rescue, exposure protection, confining the fire, extinguishing the fire, overhaul, salvage and ventilation. Upon successful completion, participants are eligible for the Minnesota State Fire Certification Board exam. (5 Cr - 3 lect, 2 lab)

FIRE1106 Firefighter II (2 Credits)
This course is designed to enhance the skills necessary to perform basic duties of firefighting, including thought processes used to decide on appropriate operations. This includes specialized rescue, building construction and fire cause determination. Upon successful completion, participants are eligible for the Minnesota State Fire Certification Board exam. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of FIRE 1100. (2 Cr – 2 lect, 0 lab)

FIRE1110 Hazardous Materials Operations (2 Credits)
This course introduces the basic skills necessary to safely and effectively manage on-scene operations involving the uncontrolled release of dangerous chemicals. It focuses on those individuals in local jurisdictions who respond to releases or potential releases of hazardous substances as part of the initial response to the site for the purpose of protecting nearby persons, property, or the environment from the effects of the release. Those individuals respond in a defensive fashion without actually trying to stop the release as their function is to contain the release from a safe distance, keep it from spreading, and prevent exposures. (2 Cr - 1.5 lect, .5 lab)

FIRE1300 Coaching the Emergency Vehicle Operator-Fire (0 Credits)
In this course student fire truck operators learn practical, defensive driving techniques that focus on the operator's ability to read traffic conditions, act and re-act accordingly, and prevent collisions in both emergency and non-emergency situations. This certification is in conjunction with Firefighter I or Firefighter II training and gives students the opportunity to enter into the workforce with the tools they need for employment and to keep our communities safe. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

FREN1001 French for Travelers (2 Credits)
Participants will learn French vocabulary and sentence structure necessary to enhance the experience of traveling in France. In addition to language instruction, there will be information on the different customs and habits travelers will encounter in France. Emphasis will be on oral French and reading for such things as asking directions, greeting people, shopping, and eating out. (2Cr -2 lect, 0 lab)

FREN1101 Elementary French I (4 Credits)
This course will provide a basic knowledge of the French language and culture. Students will develop skills in the areas of listening, reading, speaking, writing and grammar in French. These skills will be learned in the context of French culture. MnTC (Goals 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FREN1102 Elementary French II (4 Credits)
This course will provide a basic knowledge of the French language and culture in a continuation of French 1101. Students will further develop skills in the areas of listening, reading, speaking, writing, and grammar in French in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards. These skills will be learned in the context of French culture. Prerequisites: FREN 1101 or instructor approval. MnTC (Goals 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FREN2110 Intermediate French I (4 Credits)
This course will provide a better knowledge of the French language and culture and continue to build on the skills acquired in French 1101 and 1102. Students will further develop skills in the areas of listening, reading, speaking, writing and grammar in French in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards. These skills will be taught in the context of French culture. Prerequisites: FREN 1102 or equivalent. MnTC (Goal 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FREN2112 Intermediate French II (4 Credits)
This course will provide a better knowledge of the French language and culture and continue to build on the skills acquired in French 2110. Students will further develop skills in the areas of listening, reading, speaking, writing, and grammar in French. These skills will be taught in the context of French culture in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards. Prerequisites: FREN 2110 or equivalent. MnTC (Goal 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

FSCI1000 Introduction to Food Science (3 Credits)
This course is intended for the student interested in learning more about food safety and security and the basics of industrial food preparation and production. This course also will include a brief overview of scientific principles applied to the understanding of food security and the commercial preparation of food. The course will include both classroom and industry learning environments, and will include a variety of learning activities. The course also includes an overview of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FSCI1005 Lab Procedures (2 Credits)
Laboratory procedures is a course intended to introduce students to the basics of working in a laboratory setting. While each food science laboratory may be designed differently and perform different tasks, some basic procedures are almost universal. The Introduction to Food Science course is a prerequisite to this class however the two classes could be taken at the same time if schedules permit. Students should be prepared to work in a laboratory setting and have good computer and math skills. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

FSCI1010 Food Safety, Law and Sanitation (3 Credits)
This course focuses on several aspects related to producing a quality product. Students will become familiar with safe food handling procedures and product flow, HACCP, equipment and sanitization procedures, and the importance of governmental rules and regulations as they pertain to food safety. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

FSCI1020 Food Security/Bio-Security (3 Credits)
This course is designed to raise awareness of the vulnerabilities related to defense and security of the nation's food supply. It will also focus on the behaviors and motivation leading to bio-security issues. Students will be introduced to state and federal regulatory agencies involved in ensuring safe food. (3 Cr - 3 Lec, 0 Lab)

FSCI1030 Food Science Research and Development (3 Credits)
This course will focus on the processes used by the food industry taking a new product from concept to consumer. Students will have the opportunity to actually follow the process used by The Institute of Food Technologists to take a product from concept to consumer by creating a make believe product in the classroom. Food shows and tours will be conducted when possible. (3Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

FSCI1040 Food Processing (3 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce the student to specific operations involved in the processing of raw foodstuffs into those foods suitable for consumption or storage. Methods used to process and preserve a variety of foods will be examined. These will include studying the application of heat, evaporation and drying, freezing, high pressure, and irradiation in order to control microbial growth. Overall, the prevention of food spoilage will be emphasized. (3 Cr - 3 Lec, 0 Lab)

FSCI1050 Food Auditing (1 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to the reasons for and steps taken within a facility to prepare for and complete an audit. The course will focus on the steps needing to be taken to have a high scoring, successful audit. (Prerequisites: FSCI 1000 or equivalent) (1 Cr - 1 lect/0 lab)

FSCI2000 Food Microbiology and Sanitation (4 Credits)
This course will investigate the role microbes play in the food industry . Topics will include studying food-borne pathogens, spoilage organisms and their control. Methods for isolation, detection, characterization and quantitative determinations of microbial populations in foods will be examined in addition to factors that influence growth and survival of pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. Fermentative roles in food production will also be explored. (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab). Prerequisites: Chemistry 1101 and Biology 2040.

FSCI2010 Current Issues in the Food Industry (1 Credits)
This course is designed to give students an in-depth look at the current issues arising in the food safety industry. Areas to be address are recent recalls, emerging pathogens, food additives or pesticides and new technologies will be evaluated. The course will focus on some of the most current situations in the news. (Prerequisites: FSCI 1000 or equivalent) (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

GEOG1200 Human Geography (3 Credits)
This course introduces the worldwide effects of human occupancy of the earth and the influences of location on human behavior. Topics include patterns in spaces, cultural influences, means of livelihood, political spaces and human effects on the environment. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 10/PE); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

GEOG1201 Introduction to World Geography (3 Credits)
Geography addresses serious global and regional problems such as pollution, resource depletion and poverty. Questions asked include: "Where is it?," "Why is it there?" and "What is its relevance?" The emphasis in this class is on developing critical thinking. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab) MnTC: Goal 5/SS, Goal 8/GP

GLST1500 Introduction to Global Studies (3 Credits)
This course introduces students to the basic concepts, trends, and interconnectiveness of globalization throughout the world. In class, students may examine journal articles, book chapters, videos, and webcasts in the study of globalization across disciplines. It will provide an overview of history and theoretical approaches that have created a global society. This is a required course for the Global Studies Emphasis. Completion of English 1101 and 1104 or 1105 or 1106 is suggested prior to enrollment in this course. MnTC Goals (5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

GSCL1240 College Study Strategies (1 Credits)
This course is designed to develop college-level thinking, study skills and transfer of knowledge. It provides students with a process for learning different content-area materials. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

GSCL1250 Basic Business Concepts (2 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the principles of management and operation of a business. Business formation, legal topics and liability issues will be covered, as well as employee and customer relations and organizational planning. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

GSCL1255 Fundamentals of Selling and Business Operations (3 Credits)
This course provides fundamentals of sales in the business world and basic business operation and salon management. Students will develop basic skills in all these areas. (3 Cr - 1 lec, 2 lab)

GSCL1270 Employment Search Skills (1 Credits)
This course introduces students to a process of developing self-awareness when considering career opportunities and identifying career-related goals. Students conduct a job search, prepare a job application, resume, cover letter, a follow-up correspondence. The course includes preparation for job interviews. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

GSCM1500 Written Technical Communications (2 Credits)
This course is for students majoring in trade and technical occupations and covers the basics of written communications needed for work-related situations. Industry-focused instruction in the areas of sentence structure, paragraph structure, and writing style are included. Students plan, compose, format, edit, proofread, and revise a variety of business communications, including letters, memos, resumes, instructions and short reports. The use of technology, including Internet and library resources, are integrated into the course. (2 Cr - 1 lect. 1 lab)

GSCM1510 Workplace Human Relations (2 Credits)
This course examines interpersonal relationship skills in the work environment. Students evaluate individual strengths and weaknesses and assess and learn transferable skills. This course emphasizes employment-enhancing skills that include understanding and improving relationships and communication with co-workers, supervisors, subordinates, and customers. This survey course introduces concepts and methods for improvement of interpersonal relations. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

GSMA1420 Technical Math I (2 Credits)
This course covers elements of algebra and are introduced early with topics of arithmetic. Also provide a unified approach to problem solving that traditional arithmetic methods lack. The use of scientific calculators allows for efficient use of classroom time to develop mathematical concepts and problem-solving skills. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

HCCC1200 Body Structure and Function (3 Credits)
This is a one semester introductory course designed for students exploring allied health professions to develop a basic understanding of the normal structure and functioning of the body. Such knowledge is basic to understanding common disease processes. Basic medical terminology, common abbreviations, and medical symbols will be included. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HCCC1300 Disease Conditions (3 Credits)
This course is a one semester introductory course designed for students exploring allied health professions to develop a basic understanding of the principles of disease and the study of disease by body system. Signs, symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of each disease are explored; and prevention of disease is emphasized. Prerequisite: HCCC 1200 or instructor permission. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HCHH1100 Home Health Aide/Homemaker (1 Credits)
This course is designed to acquaint students with the philosophy of home health care and the role of the home health aide on the home health team. Students must have completed the Minnesota Department of Health Nursing Assistant course before enrolling in this course or be currently enrolled in the Nursing Assistant course. Enrollment for this course is at the instructor's discretion throughout the semester. Prerequisite: HCNA 1100 (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

HCNA1100 Nursing Assistant (3 Credits)
Riverland Community College is an approved Nursing Assistant training program through the Minnesota Department of Health. This 3-credit course provides students with the theory, laboratory and clinical experience to meet state and federal criteria for employment as a nursing assistant in a nursing home or other long term care facility. Completion of this course enables the student to take the Nurse Aide Competency Evaluation. After successfully completing the competency evaluation, the student will be placed on the Minnesota Nursing Assistant Registry. This course may be taken concurrently with HCHH 1100. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

HCNA1101 Nursing Assistant Practicum (1 Credits)
Students must be enrolled in the Surgical Technology Program to be eligible for this course. Students must have successfully completed the three credit Minnesota Department of Health's Nursing Assistant course and one credit Home Health Aide course prior to completing the Nursing Assistant (NA) Practicum. This course will allow the student to spend 24 hours in a perioperative surgical observation experience of more than one patient. Course enrollment by arrangement with the instructor. Prerequisites: HCNA 1100 and HCHH 1100. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

HCNA1200 Nursing Assistant/Home Health Aide-SEE NOTES ATTACHED (4 Credits)
This course emphasizes the role of the nursing assistant and home health aide as a valuable member of any health care team. This course introduces concepts of basic human needs, acquaints students with the philosophy of home health and teaches basic nursing skills that will be demonstrated and practiced in the laboratory setting. This course will focus on personal care, nutrition/feeding, elimination, clean and safe environment, communication, vital signs, body mechanics, and principles related to long term and home health care. Upon successful completion of classroom/lab studies, the student will participate in a clinical experience caring for the elderly client. Background study checks will be conducted. Successful students will be eligible to take the Nurse Aide/Home Health Aide competency examination for certification and placement on the Minnesota Nursing Assistant Registry. This course meets application requirements for the Riverland Community College nursing program. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

HCNA1251 Psycho-Social Needs (Long-term Care Skilled Worker Pathway) (0 Credits)
This is a .5-credit course emphasizing the understanding, recognition and enhancement of the psycho-social needs of residents living in long-term care facilities. Topics studied include quality of life, the Resident's Bill of Rights and depression. This course is one of five online, self-directed courses developed to increase the skill level of certified nursing assistants working in long-term care facilities. Upon successful completion of five courses in the areas of clinical observations, dementia, mentoring/leadership, psycho-social needs and restorative care, the learner will have earned 3.5 college credits. Prerequisite: Current employment as a certified nursing assistant, or the equivalent, in a long-term care facility or instructor permission. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

HCNA1252 Restorative Care (Long-term Skilled Worker Pathway) (2 Credits)
The Restorative Care course is a 1.5-credit course that will enable the learner, through the use of communication, to provide for a caring environment for the resident and family. The learner will understand how to restore resident independence by improving physical, psychological, emotional, and spiritual functions. The learner will understand how to preserve resident dignity and motivate re-learning skills that a stroke may have affected; such as dressing, eating, and walking. And finally, the learner will understand how to provide for resident safety; using fall prevention strategies to prevent falls. Restorative Care is one of five online, self-directed courses developed to increase the skill level of nursing assistants working in long-term care facilities. Upon successful completion of five courses in the areas of dementia, clinical observations, mentoring/leadership, psycho-social needs and restorative care, the learner will have earned 3.5 college credits. Prerequisite: Current employment as a certified nursing assistant, or the equivalent, in a long-term care facility or instructor permission. (1.5 Cr - 1.5 lect, 0 lab)

HCNA1253 Dementia (Long-term Care Skilled Worker Pathway) (0 Credits)
This is a .5-credit course emphasizing care-giving principles for residents with dementia living in long-term care facilities. Topics studied include the physical, psychological, emotional and behavioral dimensions of dementia. This course is one of five online, self-directed courses developed to increase the skill level of certified nursing assistants working in long-term care facilities. Upon successful completion of five courses in the areas of clinical observations, dementia, mentoring/leadership, psycho-social needs and restorative care, the learner will have earned 3.5 college credits. Prerequisite: Current employment as a certified nursing assistant, or the equivalent, in a long-term care facility or instructor permission. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

HCNA1254 Leadership/Peer Mentoring (Long-term Care Skilled Worker Pathway) (0 Credits)
This is a .5-credit course emphasizing the understanding, recognition and readiness of leadership and peer mentoring in long-term care facilities. Topics studied include leadership styles and behaviors, the role of a peer mentor and the mentoring cycle. This course is one of five online, self-directed courses developed to increase the skill level of certified nursing assistants working in long-term care facilities. Upon successful completion of five courses in the areas of clinical observations, dementia, leadership/peer mentoring, psycho-social needs and restorative care, the learner will have earned 3.5 college credits. Prerequisite: Current employment as a certified nursing assistant, or the equivalent, in a long-term care facility or instructor permission. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

HCNA1255 Clinical Observation (Long-term Care Skilled Worker Pathway) (0 Credits)
This is a .5-credit course emphasizing the components of clinical observation of pain and elimination issues of residents living in long-term care facilities. Clinical Observation is one of five online, self-directed courses developed to increase the skill level of certified nursing assistants working in long-term care facilities. Upon successful completion of five courses in the areas of clinical observation, dementia, mentoring/leadership, psycho-social needs and restorative care, the learner will earn 3.5 college credits. Prerequisite: Current employment as a certified nursing assistant, or the equivalent, in a long-term care facility, or instructor approval. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

HIST1001 United States History: Colonial to 1877 (3 Credits)
This survey course examines the genesis of American culture, society and politics in the colonial period to the Revolution. It also includes the study of the early national period to the post-Civil War years. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HIST1002 United States History: 1877 - Present (3 Credits)
This survey course emphasizes the settlement of the West, industrialism, the rise of the United States to world power, and the post-World War II gender, racial and class revolutions, which helped move the American reality closer to the American ideal. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HIST1011 European History I (3 Credits)
This survey course explores the European history from its origins to "Glorious Revolution" of 1688 in England. The course will especially focus on the Greco-Roman roots of western civilization, the medieval period, the Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HIST1012 European History II (3 Credits)
This survey course looks at modern European civilization from the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688 in England to present. It focuses on the political revolutions of the nineteenth-century, industrialism, imperialism, and the twentieth-century decline of European power. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HIST1020 Minnesota History (3 Credits)
This survey course examines Minnesota's historical development from the pre-Columbian period to the present. It will especially focus on the loss of Native American control of the state, as well as the development of Minnesota's unique political culture. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HIST1030 Modern World History (3 Credits)
This survey course examines world history from the late nineteenth-century to the present. It focuses on the decline of European global domination, the world wars, the Cold War, "Third World" liberation movements and the rise of non-European powers. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HLTH1100 Health (2 Credits)
This course addresses major health concerns, common health threats, optimal personal health planning, and current issues and topics related to health. Units included are stress, fitness, nutrition, addictive behaviors, cardiovascular disease, cancer, infectious disease, sexuality, communicable diseases, environmental health, and death and dying. Planning for personal optimal health and researching social issues are an integral part of the course. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

HLTH1130 AHA CPR and First Aid Certification (1 Credits)
This course includes instruction of adult, child, and infant for rescue breathing, airway obstruction, and one and two man Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and standard first aid. Topics covered are: obstructed airway, rescue breathing, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, injuries (soft and hard tissue), bleeding, emergencies, splinting, and sudden illness. Students will be instructed to use breathing devices, specifically the pocket mask and the bag-valve mask. This course is certified by the American Heart Association. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

HLTH1131 Basic Life Support Health Care Provider Course (1 Credits)
This course includes instruction of adult, child and infant for rescue breathing, airway obstruction and one and two person CPR. In addition students will be instructed to use breathing devices, specifically the pocket mask and the bag-valve mask. The skills taught satisfy the pre-professional and professional clinical practice. Prereq: Current certificate in CPR skills or current registration in HLTH1130. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

HLTH1135 Two-Man Caridopulmonary Resuscitation (1 Credits)
This course provides students in the healthcare professions with skills and knowledge to perform CPR for infants, children, and adults. Emergency procedures for obstructed airways with both conscious and unconscious victims is taught. Two-man resuscitation techniques are taught for emergency use by healthcare providers. (1cr 0 lec/1 lab)

HLTH1140 First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) (2 Credits)
This course provides basic principles, knowledge and skills necessary in an emergency situation to help sustain life, reduce pain and minimize the effects of injury and sudden illness. Standard first aid, infant, child, adult (one and two person) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with hands on application are covered for certification. Recognizing bone and tissue injuries, head trauma, bleeding emergencies, splinting, and sudden illnesses are also covered. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1100 Introduction to Social Work and Human Services (3 Credits)
This course examines the current roles and work place settings of social workers and human service workers. Many current policies and laws drive the function and focus of the social worker and human service worker. To understand more fully the functions of these policies and laws, this course examines a few of the important policies and laws that affect workers in this field. Ethics will be closely reviewed during the course as well as the basic skills and interventions that are required of human service workers. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1101 Human Services - Field Experience I (1 Credits)
This course provides students with the first opportunity to experience human service work under the supervision of experienced workers. Students perform 30 hours of field experience and spend an additional 15 hours in the classroom preparing for and processing these experiences. Students learn more about social work/human services and are better prepared for future career decisions in the human service and social work field. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1102 Introduction to Counseling (2 Credits)
This course focuses on enhancing communications skills such as listening, responding, and empathy, understanding unstated feelings, and owning feelings. Students explore responsibilities of the speaker and helper and assess the helper's role in communication. Students examine how these skills affect relationship building and therapeutic interventions. Guided encounters, discussions, presentations, and assigned projects help the students develop and polish their skills. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1103 Intervention and Treatment Approaches (2 Credits)
This course focuses on clarifying the role of the practitioner when intervening in helping relationships. Commonly used intervention and treatment approaches are explored, including crisis intervention skills, one-to-one counseling skills, positive parenting, role modeling, natural and logical consequences, and basic behavior modification skills. Mandated reporting is explored as it relates to children and vulnerable adults. Minnesota statutory guidelines and federal laws are reviewed. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1104 Human Services - Field Experience II (1 Credits)
This course provides students a second opportunity to learn about human service work experientially. Students perform 30 hours of field experience and spend an additional 15 hours in the classroom preparing for and processing these experiences. Students learn more about human services and focus on intervention approaches. Additional intervention approaches are presented. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in HSER 1103. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

HSER1105 Group Work Skills (2 Credits)
This course focuses on understanding group processes and utilizes this knowledge in working with groups of people. Skills and knowledge acquired are employed in two contexts: 1) understanding group interactions and their effects on the ongoing life of the group such as activities and relationships 2) leading and/or facilitating groups with a variety of special aims. A combination of cognitive and experiential techniques is used to facilitate learning that may include lectures, discussions, role-playing, group experiences, readings and films. (2 Cr- 2 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1106 Working With Young Children (3 Credits)
This course helps students identify developmental needs of young children and addresses strategies to help meet the needs in group settings. The course emphasis is on creating and utilizing appropriate developmental activities for children 0-8 years of age, health issues, parent-caregiver relationships, and developing a learning/nurturing environment. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1107 Chemical Dependency and Family Systems (3 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to the impact of chemical dependency on the individual, family, and society. Students are introduced to the progression of the illness, treatment options, and the recovery process. Using the family systems perspective, current topics such as adoptions, AIDS, divorce, blended families, elderly, and mental illness are explored as they relate to chemical dependency. This course is intended to expand the student's awareness of the importance of understanding family dynamics in working with clients. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1108 Issues in Aging (2 Credits)
Aging, from psychological, physiological, and sociological perspectives. Theories of aging, interpersonal relationships (including changing family and community roles), exploitation of the aged, chemical abuse, social, economic, and political influences will be discussed. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1109 Abuse: Causes, Effects, Intervention (1 Credits)
This course identifies the causes of domestic abuse, the impacts of abuse on victims and the children who witness it as well as the perpetrators and the types of interventions currently used. This course provides a better understanding of the dynamics of abuse and explains how to help someone affected by domestic abuse. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1110 Special Topics (1 Credits)
These courses are 15-hour classes on a variety of topics related to helping relationships. See syllabi for specifics on each course. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1111 Leisure Education (1 Credits)
This course will provide students the opportunity to define and explore leisure education. Though personal use of leisure time will be discussed, the course will focus on educational or counseling approaches to leisure that emphasize an outcome that improves personal or client lifestyle. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1112 Family Intervention and Assessment (3 Credits)
This course examines family systems with respect to historical family values and current trends in families. Students examine a variety of issues and how they impact families. These include family rules, communication styles, belief systems, societal expectations, divorce/remarriage, blended families, gender and multicultural issues that impact the family. Students are introduced to various theories relating to family assessment and counseling. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HSER1200 Current Topics in Psychology: Human Services Emphasis (1 Credits)
This course is designed to be an in depth analysis of psychological phenomenon or issues of current importance to society. Examples of topics that may be discussed include (but are not limited to): internet behavior and relationships, sexual deviance, interrogation, terrorism, gender differences, personality and personality disorders, addiction, childhood developmental and psychological disorders, religion and psychopharmacology. Specific topics for each semester will be chosen based on current events, expressed faculty/student interest and application to the field of Human Services. Selected topics may be taken for credit in either PSYC or HSER (see course schedule for sections that have this option available). Note: This course may be taken more than once with different topics. (1-3 Cr - 1-3 lect, 0 lab)

HSER2200 Internship I (4 Credits)
Internship I is a 4-credit internship. Students perform a total of 165 hours of internship. Students are expected to attend class daily. Concurrent enrollment in HSER 1102 required. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

HSER2201 Internship II (4 Credits)
Internship II is a 4-credit internship for students for contingent on satisfactory progress in HSER 2200. Students perform a total of 165 hours of internship. Students are expected to attend class daily. Concurrent enrollment in HSER 1102. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

HSER2202 Internship III (8 Credits)
Internship III is a primary internship in the Human Services Program. Each student performs a total of 330 hours in a residential treatment center, group home, daycare center or other human service setting. Concurrent enrollment in HSER 1102. (8 Cr - 8 lect, 0 lab)

HSER2203 Internship IV - Internship in Chemical Dependency (8 Credits)
Internship IV is a primary internship in the Human Program. Each student performs a total of 440 hours in a chemical dependency treatment center. This course is only to be taken by students who are pursuing a Licensed Drug and Alcohol Counselor (LADC) with the State of Minnesota. This course meets half of the State of Minnesota's 880 hour requirement for LADC. There will be 10-12 two-hour classroom sessions plus up to five hours of individual contact for students enrolled in HSER 2203. (8 Cr - 8 lect, 0 lab)

HUCF1200 Health Unit Coordinator Fundamentals (3 Credits)
This course includes the study of health care facility office and communication skills for non-clinical functions. Information about working with nursing and medical staff, other department staff, patients and visitors to contribute to the patients'/clients /residents' care and well being is emphasized. This course may be taken as an independent study. Prereq: Anatomy & Physiology Disease Conditions, Medical Terminology and Applied Medical Terminology. (3Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

HUCF1202 Health Unit Coordinator Internship (3 Credits)
This course is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the health unit coordinating field. Each internship is an individualized experience. A training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site to provide experience related to the skills and knowledge acquired in the program. One credit of internship is equal to 48 hours of internship or internship and internship seminar. Prereq: HUCF1200. (3Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 OJT)

HUMA1101 Humanities I (3 Credits)
This course examines the artifacts of prehistory and the birth of civilizations in Egypt and ancient Sumer. An examination of the Classical legacy, the contribution of Greece and Rome, is followed by a study of the patterns of life and art in the Medieval West. The course culminates in a study of the flowering of ideas and arts of the Renaissance. In all content areas instruction will focus and emphasis will be placed on history, literature, art, philosophy, architecture, music, and archeology. This course may also include arts and culture in non-Western societies. MnTC Goals (6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HUMA1102 Humanities II (3 Credits)
This course examines the High Renaissance including the challenge of the Protestant Reformation and its response - the Counter Reformation. A view of the Baroque style in art, architecture and literature is counterpointed by examining the rise of science with its confidence in the power of human reason and culminating with an analysis of eighteenth century art, music, and society. Students will investigate the progress from Realism to Modernism in the 19th and 20th Centuries. In all content areas instruction will focus and emphasis will be placed on history, literature, art, philosophy, architecture, music, and archeology. This course may also include arts and culture in non-Western societies. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HUMA1103 Popular Culture (3 Credits)
This course explores the role and importance of Popular Culture in America. In particular, students will examine the ways their own values and beliefs are shaped by the popular culture surrounding them. The course may include exploration of television, popular music, film, sports, advertising, and cyber culture. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HUMA1104 Peace Studies (3 Credits)
This course explores nonfiction works addressing issues of peace and nonviolence from such authors as Dorothy Day, Leo Tolstoy, Mohandas Gandhi, Albert Schweitzer, Colman McCarthy and H.D. Thoreau. Students will engage in a number of discussions and assignments in an attempt to foster greater understanding of issues related to peace studies. Students may watch films, read literature, research historical figures, and present reports on important topics along with other types of course work all designed to assist in the exploration of peace studies. Some discussion and written work will be required to allow students to demonstrate their knowledge of course topics and share their own individual perspective on the issues addressed in the course. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HUMA1130 Leadership Development Studies (3 Credits)
This travel/study course gives students a first-hand look at French daily life and culture. Participants will learn about France - its culture and customs, some key French phrases, and an overview of history, geography, and art. This tour with French-speaking faculty will take students to different regions in France. The group will tour cathedrals, chateaux, wineries, museums including the Louvre and Musee d'Orsay, and many historical sites. Pre-trip classes will provide valuable information about the history and culture of France plus French language phrases that will help make the trip more rewarding. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

HUMA2263 Religions of the World (3 Credits)
This course examines the major world religions and their "sub-groups." Emphasis is placed on when, where and under what influences the various religions developed, the geographical areas of the world where the religions are located, as well as the primary tenents, qualities and characteristics of the religions. The course examines the place and role of religion in human life. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

HUMA2277 The Cossack Ride: Kiev, Crimea and Istanbul Study (4 Credits)
Participants will gain an appreciation for Ukrainian and Turkish cultures and customs, an overview of history, geography and art. This study abroad course gives students an opportunity to travel and learn about these countries. The English-speaking tour guides will take students to different regions and cities in Ukraine and Istanbul, Turkey. The group will tour the Topkapi Palace, the Blue and Suleymaniye Mosques, the Hippodrome Square, shop the Grand and Spice Bazaars and cruise The Bosphorus Strait to St. Sayiour Museum. Students will have the opportunity to tour Kherson Technical University, our sister college. (4 lec credits)

HUMA2287 The History and Culture of France (2 Credits)
Participants will learn about France - its culture and customs, some key French phrases, and an overview of history, geography, and art. This travel/study course gives students a first hand look at French daily life and culture. This tour with French speaking faculty will take students to different regions in France. The group will tour cathedrals, chateaux, wineries, museums including the Louvre and Musee d'Orsay, and many historical sites. Pre-trip classes will provide valuable information about the history and culture of France plus French language phrases that will help make the trip more rewarding. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

HUMA2288 French Frolic (4 Credits)
This travel/study course gives students a first-hand look at French daily life and culture. Participants will learn about France - its culture and customs, some key French phrases, and an overview of history, geography, and art. This tour with French-speaking faculty will take students to different regions in France. The group will tour cathedrals, chateaux, wineries, museums including the Louvre and Musee d'Orsay, and many historical sites. Pre-trip classes will provide valuable information about the history and culture of France plus French language phrases that will help make the trip more rewarding. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

HUMA2295 The Culture in London-London Dash Light (2 Credits)
British culture comes alive as students experience London and the surrounding area. This travel/study opportunity gives students a first-hand look at British theater, art, music, and daily culture. Tour with faculty members, or discover on your own, the great sights of London, including Trafalgar Square, the Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, the British Museum, and historic sites. At night you may see The Royal Shakespeare Company or hear some of the world's greatest symphonies. Pre-Dash classes help prepare students to gain the most from an exciting and memorable trip to what many call the world's greatest city. A short journey to Paris from London is also available. A fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

HUMA2297 The Culture of London - London Dash (4 Credits)
British culture comes alive as students experience London and the surrounding area. This travel/study opportunity gives students a first-hand look at British theater, art, music, and daily culture. Tour with faculty members, or discover on your own, the great sights of London, including Trafalgar Square, the Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, the British Museum, and historic sites. At night see The Royal Shakespeare Company or hear some of the world's greatest symphonies. Pre-Dash classes help prepare students to gain the most from an exciting and memorable trip to what many call the world's greatest city. A short journey to Paris from London is also available. A fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

IMMR1705 Safety and OSHA (1 Credits)
This course introduces general safety as it pertains to the machine shop. The course includes forklift safety, Occupational Safety Health Administration, (OSHA) Right to Know, personal safety, and other safety topics. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

IMMR1710 Cutting & Drilling Machine (1 Credits)
This course introduces the fundamentals of power saws and the blades used, as well as drills and drilling machines. Topics include the use of both vertical and horizontal saws, drill presses, with calculations of drill speeds and feeds, power tapping, reaming, counterboring, and countersinking. Shop safety is a very important component of this course. Students are required to build parts following print to specification. Prerequisites: IMMR 1715 and IMMR 1750. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

IMMR1715 Small Tool Usage (2 Credits)
This course introduces the study, care, and uses of small tools as they relate to maintenance. This includes precision measuring tools used in a machine shop, micrometers, calipers, etc. Other subjects include the use of hand tools, hacksaws, files, punches, taps and dies, and other mechanical hardware. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

IMMR1720 Low Pressure Boiler (4 Credits)
This course covers boiler functions, operations, safety, controls, hot water systems, steam systems, and the identification of boiler fittings. This course is designed to help the student prepare for a special engineer's license exam, which is offered on campus. Students will get actual hands-on boiler operation experience including boiler water testing and simulation of boiler controls through the use of boiler software. (4Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab, 0 other)

IMMR1722 Entry Level Pressure Boiler Operation (2 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the operation of boilers. Major topics include boiler functions, operations, safety, controls, hot water systems, steam systems and the identification of boiler fittings. The primary focus of the class is to prepare each student to pass the special engineer's license. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

IMMR1723 Entry Level Boiler Operator Lab Training (2 Credits)
This course allows students actual boiler operations experience after successfully passing the State of Minnesota Special Engineer's License Exam. Major topics include boiler functions, operations, safety, controls, hot water systems, steam systems, and the identification of boiler fittings. Students experience actual hands on boiler operation including boiler water testing. Simulation of boiler controls through the use of boiler software is also included. Prerequisite: IMMR 1722 or a State of Minnesota Boiler Operator's license. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

IMMR1725 Arc Welding (3 Credits)
This course includes the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process starting with the power sources, electrodes, and the various applications. A great deal of time is spent in the lab developing skills using this welding process. Welds are made in all positions using various types of electrodes. Welding codes and applications are also covered and followed. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

IMMR1730 Gas Welding & Cutting (3 Credits)
This course introduces the use of oxy-fuel welding and cutting equipment. The students cut using both hand and machine torches. Safety as related to oxy-fuel equipment is a critical part of this course. Set-up, applications, and metallurgy are also included. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

IMMR1740 Lathe Theory I (4 Credits)
This course introduces basic lathe theory and operations. Students identify the machines' principal parts and functions and perform basic machining operations such as facing, straight turning, boring, threading, and others. Students calculate speed and feeds. Shop safety is covered and practiced. Prerequisites: IMMR 1710, IMR 1715, and IMMR 1750. (4 Cr - 1 lect, 3 lab)

IMMR1745 Milling Machine Theory I (3 Credits)
This course introduces basic vertical machine theory and operations. Students identify the machine controls and their functions and perform basic milling setups including tool head alignment and vise alignment. Students calculate speeds and feeds and perform basic milling operations such as squaring the toolhead, aligning the vise, and cutting a keyseat. Shop safety is covered and practiced. Prerequisites: IMMR 1710, IMMR 1715, and IMMR 1750. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

IMMR1750 Blueprint Reading (2 Credits)
This course introduces the basic understanding of blueprint reading. Various mechanical drawings and types of prints for the interpretation and manufacturing of parts and the assembly of equipment are also included. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

IMMR1760 Introduction to Basic Hydraulics (3 Credits)
This course covers basic hydraulic system principles including symbols, pumps, control valves, cylinders, and the reading and drawing of schematics. Disassembly and assembly of hydraulic components are also included. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

IMMR1770 Bearings and Seals (2 Credits)
This course introduces types of bearing and seals. It also covers installation, removal, measurement, and inspections of both bearing and seals. Reasons for premature bearing failures and remedies for these problems are also covered. Lubrication types for different applications are included. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

IMMR1775 Jigs and Fixtures (2 Credits)
This course introduces the use and construction of jigs and fixtures and their purpose within the manufacturing industry. It will include basic concepts, ideas, and fundamentals of jigs and fixtures. Techniques of design and fabrication as they apply for different work holding requirements and a problem-solving in the tool design. Construction, assembly, and completion of project will need to follow approval of inspection. Prerequisites: IMMR 1710. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

IMMR2720 Fundamentals of Electrical Maintenance (4 Credits)
This course introduces the fundamentals of electricity, the use of voltmeters, electrical symbols, and electrical schematic reading. The basic understanding and application of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) are studied. These skills together help the student better understand and troubleshoot an electrical circuit. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

IMMR2725 High Pressure Boiler (3 Credits)
This course introduces the safety in the operation of high pressure boilers. Topics covered include boiler fittings, daily and monthly safety checks, operation and maintenance, feedwater accessories, steam accessories, turbines, and environmental control systems. This course is designed to prepare the student for a second-class high pressure boilers license. Prerequisites: IMMR 1720 or one year experience in boiler operation. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

IMMR2730 Machine Repair (3 Credits)
This course introduces the methods used to check and repair machines. The study of vibrations, reverse dial indicating, and using thermal analysis to check machines are covered as well as the process of disassembling and assembly of components. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). Prerequisites: IMMR 2735. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

IMMR2735 Preventative Maintenance (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes Preventive Maintenance (PM), the value of a good maintenance program, and the returns that can be expected with its implementation. Topics covered include maintenance checklists, PM costs, lost revenue costs, and starting an on-site PM program. The monitoring of equipment includes the use of infrared camera (thermography), laser alignment, vibration analysis, and oil analysis. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). Prerequisites: IMMR 1715 and IMMR 1770. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

IMMR2740 Lathe II (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes lathe operations for the manufacturing of parts for the assembly of tools. Students practice more precise lathe operation, more advanced machinery set-ups, and maintain tolerances that are highly critical. In the laboratory setting, this course builds a higher skill level than Lathe I. The students are required to use blueprints to fabricate individual parts to build tools. Prerequisites: IMMR 1740. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

IMMR2745 Milling Machines II (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes milling operations to manufacture parts for the assembly of tools to be built. Students practice more precise milling operations, more advanced machinery setups and maintain tolerances that are highly critical. In the laboratory setting, this course builds a higher skill level than Milling Machines I. The students are required to use blueprints to fabricate individual parts to build tools. Prerequisites: IMMR 1745. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

IMMR2750 Piping Systems (3 Credits)
This course introduces basic piping practices and identification of fittings, including galvanized and black pipe, plastic pipe, and copper tubing. Sheet metal fabrication which includes the use of brakes, shears, and hand tools is included. Students are required to follow blueprints to fabricate sheet metal parts and piping projects. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

IMMR2760 Hydraulics II (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes pneumatic and hydraulic systems using hands-on assembly and disassembly of components. Mechatronics trainers are covered. The combination of mechanical, pneumatic, electoral, and Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC0 gives the student an understanding of what Mechatronics is. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). Prerequisite: IMMR 1760. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

IMMR2761 Pneumatic Theory (2 Credits)
This course covers pneumatic system using hands-on assembly and disassembly of components. Pneumatic schematics will be studied. The use of air operated trainers will also be discussed. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

IMMR2765 Gas, Metal, Arc Welding I (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW). The course includes the following major groups: power sources, shielding gases, wire feeders, and torches. Each one of these groups is covered in detail. Time is spent in the lab developing skills in using the process and setting up the equipment for the various applications. The focus of this course is on the use of wire feed welding equipment, application, and setup. Safety is a major consideration including welding equipment and the handling of various gases. Welding skills are developed through completion of welding projects. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

IMMR2770 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes applications for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW\Heli-Arc) in the welding industry. Power sources, current types, current selection, shielding gases and torch types are also covered. Various procedures are discussed for welding different metals and problems that may be encountered. Safety procedures and the handling of high-pressure cylinders, especially when using the GTAW, are covered. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

IMMR2800 Weld Inspection (2 Credits)
This course emphasizes the basic understanding of mechanical drives and transmissions. The inspection of equipment to include gears, bearings, seals, shafts and other mechanical components are covered. These skills are necessary to troubleshoot and diagnose problems that occur within the Wind Turbine field. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

IMMR2900 Mechanical Systems, Transmissions, and Drives (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes the basic understanding of mechanical drives and transmissions. The inspection of equipment to include gears, bearings, seals, shafts and other mechanical components are covered. These skills are necessary to troubleshoot and diagnose problems that occur within the Wind Turbine field. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

INFS1000 Introduction to Information Literacy (1 Credits)
Information literacy is the ability to retrieve, evaluate and use information effectively. This course is an introduction to the organization, retrieval, and critical evaluation of information from print and electronic sources. Students will learn how information is organized, the information research process, and how to formulate an effective search strategy. Students will also learn to critically evaluate information and the ethical use of information as it related to copyright. Students will be able to apply the skills and concepts learned from this course to future research assignments. Basic computer skills, strongly recommended. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

LAWE1100 Introduction to Handgun/Marksmanship for Law Enforcement (1 Credits)
This course is designed for law enforcement students who have little or no experience with firearms. It introduces the students to the very basics of handgun and shotgun use. This course stresses the safe handling of all firearms and the maintenance of them. The students will provide a criminal background check to the instructor at the beginning of the class. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota Police Officer Selection Test (P.O.S.T.) licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE1105 Introduction to Law Enforcement (3 Credits)
This course examines the history, evolution of and contemporary institutions of law enforcement and criminal justice. Students obtain a general knowledge of the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights with special emphasis on criminal and civil law as it relates to the law enforcement and criminal justice systems. Various theories and concepts, historically and currently utilized, are discussed and applied throughout the learning process. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE1110 Criminal Investigations (3 Credits)
This is an introductory course for the basic fundamentals of crime scene and post-crime investigation. Students analyze methods of handling the crime scene, use detection and identification equipment, and prepare the case for prosecution. The second portion of this course examines interview and interrogation techniques utilized by law enforcement. Students differentiate between interviews and interrogations. Students perform simulated interrogations to demonstrate understanding of the interrogation process. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota Police Officer Selection Test (P.O.S.T.) licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Law Enforcement or Criminal Justice program or obtain instructor approval prior to registering for this course. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE1115 Basic Firearms (2 Credits)
This course introduces legal aspects regarding use of force in law enforcement and firearms usage. Students study state and federal laws governing use of force and authorized use of deadly force by police officers. A thorough understanding of the use of force continuum is necessary. Students examine proper use and operation of the handgun and instruction in different methods of shooting positions. The students provide a criminal background check to the instructor at the beginning of the class. Students prepare for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. certified shooting course according to the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Office Education. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Criminal Justice or Law Enforcement program. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE1120 Human Behavior for Law Enforcement (2 Credits)
This course introduces students to the skill of identifying people in crisis. Students learn about stress management and its effects and the importance of being physically fit. Students study verbal de-escalation and mediations skills. Students are introduced to support services available in communities in which they work. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. (2 C - 2 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE1125 Ethics for Law Enforcement (1 Credits)
This course examines ethics and ethical behavior for law enforcement officers. Professionalism in the field of law enforcement and criminal justice is the focus of the course. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in the Law Enforcement or Criminal Justice program or obtain instructor approval prior to registering for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE1130 Human Behavior/Stress Management/Ethics for Criminal Justice (2 Credits)
This course is designed to familiarize students with the importance of being able to identify person in crisis, including themselves. Students will learn about stress and its effects, how to manage stress, and the importance of being physically fit. Students will also learn verbal de-escalation skills as well as some mediation skills. They will learn to support services available to them and the communities in which they work. This course will also provide students with an in-depth and comprehensive discussion of ethics, ethical behavior and discretion afforded Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice professionals. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota Police Officer Selection Test (P.O.S.T.) licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE2110 Police Report Writing (2 Credits)
This course introduces students to the writing of clear, factual police reports. Well written reports are emphasized and relevant to investigating and prosecuting criminal cases. Students are required to take thorough field notes and transfer information to the appropriate paperwork. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 or instructor approval. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE2117 Criminal Statutes (3 Credits)
This course introduces Minnesota Chapter 609 of the Minnesota Criminal Code as prescribed by the Minnesota P.O.S.T. Board. Criminal statutes applicable to law enforcement are discussed. Students interpret statutes by identifying and analyzing the elements necessary to make an arrest and obtain a conviction and explain the elements of crimes as stated in the Minnesota Criminal Code. Students identify special Minnesota peace officer duties associated with specific statutes. Laws relating to the use of force and use of deadly force are discussed and analyzed. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in the Law Enforcement or Corrections Program or obtain instructor approval prior to registering for this course. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE2118 Traffic Statutes (2 Credits)
This course introduces students to Minnesota Traffic Code as prescribed by the Minnesota Police Officer Selection Test (P.O.S.T.) Board. Students interpret the statutes by identifying and analyzing the elements necessary to make an arrest and obtain a conviction. Students identify the elements of the traffic code and the Letter of the Law versus the Spirit of the Law. Students receive instruction on equipment, radar, and impaired driving. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Law Enforcement or Criminal Justice program or obtain instructor approval prior to registering for this course. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE2120 Minnesota State Statutes (3 Credits)
This course is designed to familiarize students with Minnesota Chapter 609, 169, 169A, 171, 340A, and 152 of Minnesota Statutes as prescribed by the Minnesota P.O.S.T. Board. Students are introduced to the criminal, traffic, alcohol and drug statutes applicable to law enforcement. Instruction is given on interpretation of the statutes by identifying and analyzing the elements necessary to make an arrest and obtain a conviction. Students will explain the elements of offenses as stated in the Minnesota Code books. Students will also explain special Minnesota peace officer duties associated with specific statutes. Laws relating to the use of force and use of deadly fore will be discussed and analyzed. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota Police Officer Selection Test (P.O.S.T.) licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in the Law Enforcement or Corrections Program or obtain instructor approval prior to registering for this course. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE2122 Criminal Procedure (3 Credits)
This course introduces students to the basic concepts of Criminal Procedure through the study of the U.S. Constitution. Special emphasis is given to the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments pertaining to law enforcement. This course reviews previous court decisions. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Law Enforcement or Criminal Justice program or obtain instructor approval prior to registering for this course. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE2130 Police Tactics and Procedures (3 Credits)
This course introduces students to the tactics necessary and appropriate to safely and successfully control critical situations. Students study escalation and de-escalation tactics and procedures. The continuum of force including practical exercises or scenarios is the primary focus of this course. An intense physical agility pre- and post-test are incorporated into the evaluation and expectations of this course. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Law Enforcement or Criminal Justice program or obtain instructor approval prior to registering for this course. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE2135 Community Policing and Service Internship (3 Credits)
This course involves an 80 hour on-site experience in a professional criminal justice/correction/law enforcement/government agency or other non-profit organization. Students are required to complete 100 hours of observation and direct service at the field site and participate in progress meetings to process experience in the professional environment. Students obtain first-hand experience observing and working in a professional field site. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota Police Officer Selection Test (P.O.S.T.) licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Criminal Justice or Law Enforcement program. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

LAWE2140 Emergency Vehicle Operations (1 Credits)
This course is designed to assist students in preparation for the SKILLS portion of the law enforcement program. Students develop the ability and confidence to handle emergency vehicles during routine patrol and pursuit situations. Students study the different types of police patrol and response to calls along with the safe and proper operation of patrol vehicles. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Law Enforcement or Criminal Justice program or obtain instructor approval prior to registering for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE2150 Law Enforcement Skills (10 Credits)
This is a practical exercise course designed to help students develop the skills and knowledge necessary for successful completion of the Minnesota Peace Officer Standards and Training Board License Examination and for a successful career in the law enforcement profession. This course is delivered through an agreement with Range Technical College (Hibbing), Rochester Community and Technical College and Riverland Community College or other POST approved SKILLS provider. ***Requires Program Coordinator approval. This course is designed to be taken during the final semester of the Law Enforcement program. (10Cr - 0 lect, 10 lab, Spring)

LAWE2160 MN POST License Review (2 Credits)
This course is designed to prepare students for the Minnesota Police Officer Selection Test P.O.S.T. exam. Topics and questions similar to those found on the P.O.S.T. exam are covered. This course refreshes the students' knowledge pertaining to the many topic areas covered in previous law enforcement classes. Current students, graduates from any law enforcement programs, and law enforcement personnel from other states who desire to take the reciprocity test benefit from this course. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota Police Officer Selection Test (P.O.S.T.) licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

LAWE2202 Juvenile Law & Procedures (3 Credits)
This course introduces concepts, theories, and statutes associated with juvenile offenders with specific treatment method and modalities as applied to this offender group. Students are introduced to the various correctional facilities, programs, and professional interventions available to youth offenders. Specific differences among delinquent offenders and various types of juvenile statutes are presented along with the dispositional alternatives available ranging from Diversion through Extended Juvenile Jurisdiction (EJJ) and Certification. Several landmark legal cases involving juvenile matters are presented. The Minnesota Juvenile Code and Court Procedure are examined. In addition to traditional educational experiences, students have opportunities to attend and participate in workshops, seminars, conferences, and/or other relevant training sponsored by various associations and organizations within the criminal justice system. These experiences provide avenues for possible future employment in Juvenile Corrections. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the Minnesota P.O.S.T. licensing exam. This course includes criteria required by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training and Learning Objectives for Professional Peace Officer Education. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

LENR1100 Introduction to Global Positioning System (GPS) (2 Credits)
This course provides students with an overview of portable global positioning systems (GPS). The course familiarizes students with GPS and GPS applications. This course will also enable students to locate given positions and safely return to the point of origin. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

LENR1110 Wildlife Identification (3 Credits)
This course provides the students a comprehensive overview of small game, big game, birds, and fish for the purpose of proper identification. It prepares students to identify wild game in the field as required of a Conservation Officer. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in the Law Enforcement and/or Criminal Justice program or be a graduate with a degree in Law Enforcement and/or Criminal Justice. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

LENR1120 Minnesota Environmental Statutes (3 Credits)
This course familiarizes students with the various Minnesota Department of Natural Resources game and fish laws established to protect various species and the environment. Students are introduced to the hunting and fishing laws through the use of state regulation books for the given seasons. It also covers statutes protecting the environment. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in the Law Enforcement and/or Criminal Justice program or be a graduate with a degree in Law Enforcement and/or Criminal Justice. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

LENR1150 Field Experience for Environmental Conservation (5 Credits)
This course familiarizes students with the different aspects and varied duties of the role of a Conservation Officer. Students job shadow conservation officers. Students also volunteer at the many regional environmental facilities available to them such as the Jay C. Hormel Nature Center, Helmer Myre State Park, Eagle Bluff Environmental Center, and the state fish hatchery in Lanesboro. Students experience the diversity and demands of our rich environmental gifts. 150 hours of volunteer time as well as classroom time will be needed to complete this course. (5 Cr - 0 lect, 5 lab)

MASS1600 Introduction to Massage Therapy (2 Credits)
This course provides students with an in-depth knowledge of basic massage techniques. Identification of superficial muscles, palpation, and appropriate massage strokes are taught. Introductory knowledge of the physiology of body systems is included and related to massage. Positioning of clients, contraindications to treatment, ethical decision-making, and appropriate draping techniques, as well as the importance of client feedback to the therapist are covered. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the Massage Therapy Program and current CPR certification. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

MASS1601 Intermediate Massage (4 Credits)
This course is a continuation to MASS 1600. Further theory, techniques and applications of massage therapy are taught including work on muscles and fascia, methods of tension release, and injury-repair process. Techniques to release adhesions and restore circulation are covered including friction, pressure, and cross-fiber stroking. Trigger/tender point location, soft tissue mobilization, and stretching are addressed. The effects of stress and its relationship to chronic tension is investigated and related to the stress-tension-pain cycle. Importance of client/therapist communication is emphasized. Detailed interview and assessment techniques are taught and reviewed through scenarios. Objective and subjective evaluation is utilized for evaluation. Documentation of treatment plans and need for referral is covered. Prerequisites: Acceptance in Massage Therapy Program, completion of MASS 1600, enrollment in all fall semester courses and current CPR certification. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

MASS1602 Kinesiology (4 Credits)
This course focuses on deeper skeletal muscles of the body, various types of muscle fibers and structures, their origins, insertions, and actions. Restrictions and laxity of muscles are also discussed. Palpation skills are taught to identify bony landmarks, muscle bellies, tendons, and ligaments. This course compares the various types of connective tissue and contrasts their functions. Prerequisites: Acceptance in Massage Therapy Program, completion of MASS 1600, enrollment in all fall semester courses and current CPR certification. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

MASS1603 Reflexology and Chair Massage (2 Credits)
This course provides students with the ability to perform comprehensive reflexology. The student identifies reflex areas and relates them to effects on the whole body. Students palpate soft tissue and body landmarks of the hands and feet. Included are basic chair massage techniques with the goal of performing effective 5 to 30 minute massages. Proper criteria is examined for distinguishing when chair rather than table massage should of may be used. Proper techniques, temperatures and treatment methods for hot stone massage are also taught along with contraindications to each of these modalities. Prerequisites: Acceptance in Massage Therapy Program, completion of MASS 1600, enrollment in all fall semester courses, and current CPR certification. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

MASS1604 Issues in Massage Therapy (2 Credits)
This course concentrates on psychological and physical challenges faced by massage therapists focusing on both physical and mental health. It also addresses the effects of stress, repetitive motion, body posture, personality, attitudes, beliefs, and coping techniques exhibited by therapists and clients. Introduction to basic business practices, massage insurance certification, and National Certification are also covered. Prerequisites: Successful completion of first semester courses, enrollment in second semester courses and current cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MASS1605 Special Populations in Massage Therapy (3 Credits)
This pathology course covers a wide array of conditions and diseases which are often contraindications to massage therapy. Recognition of symptoms, both visual, and otherwise are included. Acute and post-acute stages of conditions are covered in detail. Variations and alternative massage techniques available to the client and therapist are discussed, as well as if and when normal massage routines may be resumed. Prerequisites: Successful completion of first semester courses, enrollment in second semester courses and current cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

MASS1606 Myofascial Deep Tissue Massage (4 Credits)
This course builds on previously learned therapeutic massage techniques. The theory, techniques and applications of deep tissue massage are taught including deep work on the muscles and fascia and methods of tension release. Myofascial skills are taught for application to treatment of the stress-tension-pain cycle and as stretching techniques for facilitation of increased joint ranges. Friction, pressure, and vigorous cross fiber stroking techniques are also covered.More in-depth evaluation and documentation treatments are practiced for deep tissue and MFR scenarios. Students will learn the basic principles of alternative therapies such as: Yoga, Reiki, Rolfing, Shiatsu and Craniosacral Therapy, and acupuncture. Prereq: successful completion of first semester massage therapy courses 4Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

MASS1608 Advanced Massage (4 Credits)
This course covers massage techniques for pregnancy, infant and geriatric massage, as well as hands-on treatments for clients who are mentally challenged, cognitively challenged, have a mental illness, or are physically challenged. Special massage skills involve evaluation, positioning, strokes, documentation, indications, precautions, and contraindications for treatment. Scenarios are used and human subjects are brought in for application of the special techniques necessary when working with these clients. This course is taken in conjunction with the MASS 1605, Special Populations course. Advanced techniques in myofascial release and deep tissue massage are included in lab skills for use with sprats and deep tissue injuries. Prerequisites: Successful completion of first semester courses, enrollment in second semester courses and current cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

MASS1609 Topics in Massage Therapy (2 Credits)
This course introduces the basics of a variety of popular spa modalities and covers the principles and foundations of various bodywork techniques. This class acquaints students with the endless possibilities of massage specialties and helps students narrow future areas of expertise. Spa equipment, products, and body treatment application procedures are addressed. The ancient Chinese theory of meridian and the balancing of Chi (energy) are researched and discussed, as well as the basics of performing meridian acupressure. Touch for Health techniques involving the isolation and repair of individual injured or low-functioning muscles are included. Prerequisites: Acceptance to the Massage Therapy Program and current cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MASS1610 Clinical Experience and Internship (5 Credits)
This course builds upon the knowledge, experience, and progress obtained in the Massage Therapy Program by expanding the practice of hands-on massage to outside populations. Students create an environment for practicing professional massage which include professionalism, proper business knowledge and ethics, appropriate health and business paperwork, an atmosphere conducive to massage, and behavior which shows dedication to the aspired profession. This class is the culmination and incorporation of all training received in the program and is therefore essential to the successful completion of the Massage Therapy Program. Prerequisites: Successful completion of first semester courses, enrollment in second semester courses and current cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification. (5 Cr - 1 lect, 5 lab)

MATH0540 Basic Technical Mathematics (2 Credits)
This is a course for the student who will be enrolled in a technical program and has an inadequate background in basic mathematics, or who is returning to school after a lapse of time and needs to review and strengthen basic arithmetic skills. This course will prepare the student for success in their specific technical area. Students will develop problem solving skills used in specific technical applications, master basic mathematical concepts and apply these skills in the technical mathematics course. This course is offered on a pass/no credit basis only. It will not meet MnTC Mathematics and Logical Reasoning requirements for graduation. Placement on Accuplacer Arithmetic test score between 35-55. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MATH 1020 is required. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MATH0550 Basic Mathematics (2 Credits)
This is a course for the student who has an inadequate background in basic arithmetic, or who is in need of review. This course will provide the student with a solid background in both concepts and skills needed for future coursework in mathematics and related areas. This course is offered on a pass/no credit basis only. It will not meet mathematics and logical reasoning requirements for graduation. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MATH0560 Introductory Algebra (3 Credits)
This is a course for the student who has an inadequate background in elementary algebra or who is in need of review. This course will provide the student with a solid background in both concepts and skills needed for future coursework in mathematics and related areas. This course is offered on a pass/no credit basis only. It will not meet MnTC Mathematics and Logical Reasoning requirements for graduation. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

MATH0565 Basic Math and Introductory Algebra (5 Credits)
This is a course for the student who has an inadequate background in basic arithmetic, elementary algebra, or who is in need of review. This course will provide the student with a solid background in both concepts and skills needed for future coursework in mathematics and related areas. This course is offered on a pass/no credit basis only. It will not meet mathematics and logical reasoning requirements for graduation. (5Cr - 5 lect, 0 lab)

MATH0570 Intermediate Algebra (4 Credits)
This is a course for the student with less than two years of high school algebra or with insufficient mastery of algebraic fundamentals. It will not meet mathematics requirement for graduation. This course is a graded course. It will not meet MnTC Mathematics and Logical Reasoning requirements for graduation. A score of C or better is the prerequisite for MATH 1110. Prerequisite: MATH 0560 or appropriate placement test. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

MATH1020 Technical Math I (2 Credits)
This course covers basic mathematics and elements of algebra that will prepare students for success in their specific technical areas. Students will develop their problem solving skills and master mathematical concepts used in specific technical applications. Students will receive a grade for this course. It will not meet MnTC Mathematics and Logical Reasoning requirements for graduation. Prerequisite: A score of 56 or above on the Accuplacer Arithmetic test, a score of 51 or above on the Elementary Algebra test or Math 0540. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MATH1050 Mathematics for Liberal Arts (3 Credits)
This course is an exploration of a variety of areas of mathematics designed for students who are majoring in various areas of the liberal arts or in elementary education. Introductory material in sets, logic, probability, statistics, and consumer mathematics will be applied using a problem solving approach. Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra or MATH 0570 or score of 70 on the elementary algebra portion of the placement test. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

MATH1090 Algebra & Trigonometry I (3 Credits)
This course covers the basics of Algebra and Trigonometry with emphasis on applications for Electronics. Prereq: none (3CR - 1 lect, 2 lab)

MATH1110 College Algebra (3 Credits)
This course covers the basics of college level algebra emphasizing understanding of the basic principles through investigation. The topics covered range from a basic algebra review to exploration of linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions along with a study of rational expressions, inverse relations, function operations, complex numbers, and systems of equations. Prerequisites: MATH 0570 with grade of C or better or appropriate placement placement test score. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

MATH1115 Pre Calculus (5 Credits)
This course is for students requiring further experience with advanced algebra prior to calculus. Topics include trigonometric functions and their inverses, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, complex numbers, linear and non-linear inequalities and equations; mathematical induction, analytic trigonometry, sequences, series, higher order rational, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Optional: matrices, vectors, graphing polar equations Prerequisite: Math 1110 with grade of C or better or qualifying score on placement exam. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (5 Cr - 5 lect, 0 lab)

MATH1120 Trigonometry (4 Credits)
This course builds on the computational, problem solving, and graphing skills learned in previous math courses. The topics covered in this course include trigonometric ratios, functions, graphs, identities, equations, inverse trigonometric functions, solution of the general triangle and other applications, conic sections, polar coordinates, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 1110 or equivalent. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (4 Cr- 4 lect, 0 lab)

MATH1200 Mathematics of Communication (3 Credits)
An exploration of several areas of mathematics. Topics include set theory, logic, basic Boolean algebra, formulas, solutions of equations, matrices, numeration in decimal, binary, octal and hexadecimal notation, triangle trigonometry and the graphs of trigonometric functions. Applications will be drawn from areas such as verbal reasoning, spatial relationship, physics and modern communications. Prereq: MATH0570 or placement test at college level. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab) MnTC: Goal 4/MA, Goal 2/CT

MATH1210 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I (5 Credits)
This course covers the basics of calculus emphasizing understanding of the basic principles through investigation. The course begins with a review of functions and continues with limits, rates of change, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives, and antiderivatives. Concepts are presented graphically and numerically as well as algebraically. Prerequisites: MATH 1120 or 4 years of high school math. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (5 Cr - 5 lect, 0 lab)

MATH1220 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II (5 Credits)
The second-semester course in this calculus sequence focuses on reconstructing a function from its derivative, introducing the integral, using the definite integral, mastering techniques of integration, solving differential equations, and calculating approximations. Taylor Series and Fourier Series are introduced and geometric series and their applications are discussed. Prerequisite: MATH 1210. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (5 Cr - 5 lect, 0 lab)

MATH1400 Introduction to Calculus (4 Credits)
This course is for students requiring a single course in calculus. Topics studied will include limits, differentiation of elementary functions, differentials, integration of standard forms, applications of the derivative, applications of the integral, and an introduction to partial derivatives. Students who plan to earn credit in more than one calculus course should register for MATH 1210-1220.Prerequisite: MATH 1110 or equivalent. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and Goal 2/CT); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

MATH2210 Multi-variable Calculus (5 Credits)
including differential and integral calculus of several variables. Topics covered include vectors and geometry in two- and three-dimensional space, vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus including Gauss', Green's and Stokes' Theorems. Prerequisites: MATH 1210 and MATH 1220 or equivalent courses. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (5 Cr - 5 lect, 0 lab)

MEDA1100 Introduction to Clinical Procedures (3 Credits)
This course is the first part of a two-part clinical series for medical assistant students, students considering a career in medical assisting, and anyone wishing to update or enhance their knowledge in this area of health care. The fundamentals of the clinical aspect of medical assisting and performance of basic clinical skills is covered. Course content includes communication and professionalism, basic principles of psychology, medical asepsis, the medical assistant's role in assisting the health care provider with medical exams and clinical procedures, and appropriate documentation. Prerequisites: It is recommended that BUSO1668 Medical Terminology and HCCC1200 Body Structure and Function be taken before or concurrently with this class. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

MEDA1120 Clinical Procedures II  (4 Credits)
This course is the second part of a two-part clinical series for medical assistant students. The fundamentals of medical assisting in relation to surgical asepsis and sterile procedures, wound care, physical therapy; specialty care including obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, gastroenterology, urology, and male reproductive health are studied. The student performs specific skills related to the above areas of study. The basic principles of respiratory diagnostic testing, radiology, emergency preparedness, and medical coding are also covered. Continued topics that are stressed and built upon from MEDA1100 include professionalism, therapeutic communication, developmental and age appropriate care, and accurate documentation. Prerequisite: MEDA1100 (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

MEDA1200 Introduction to Medical Office Procedures (3 Credits)
This course is the first part of a two-part series for medical assistant students, students considering a career in medical assisting or medical office administration, and anyone wishing to update or enhance their knowledge of medical office procedures and the administrative aspects of healthcare. This course introduces the student to the various roles of the medical assistant. Additional topics introduced include professionalism, communication, organization, legal considerations and scope of practice, office technology, medical office management, billing, scheduling, and medical records management. Prerequisites: None 3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab

MEDA1220 Medical Office Procedures II (3 Credits)
This course is the second part of a two-part series for medical assistant students, students considering a career in medical assisting or medical office administration, and anyone wishing to update or enhance their knowledge of medical office procedures and the administrative aspects of healthcare. This course builds upon the topics covered in MEDA1200 while integrating medical office tasks and technologies including computer operations and word processing, written and verbal communication techniques, medical document production, medical record organization and maintenance, finance management, confidentiality, insurance and third-party payers, and medical coding. Prerequisites: BUSA 1065 and MEDA1200 3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab

MEDA1300 Introduction to Laboratory Procedures  (2 Credits)
This is the first part of a two-part laboratory procedures series for medical assistant and phlebotomy students, students considering a career in medical assisting or phlebotomy, and anyone wishing to update or enhance their knowledge in laboratory sciences and phlebotomy. The course introduces medical laboratory career options in healthcare, medical laboratory safety and infection control, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, quality control and assurance, medical terminology, certification processes, professional organizations, and ethical/legal issues. The major emphasis is phlebotomy skills. The course introduces the students to computerized laboratory information systems. Prerequisites: None 2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab

MEDA1320 Laboratory Procedures II (2 Credits)
This is the second part of a two-part laboratory procedures series for medical assistant and phlebotomy students, students considering a career in medical assisting, and anyone wishing to update or enhance their knowledge in laboratory sciences. This course builds upon material covered in MEDA1300 covering the laboratory procedures of urinalysis, immunology, serology, hematology, clinical chemistry, microbiology, and body fluid analysis. The student performs waived testing according to Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA) guidelines. Prerequisites: MEDA1300 2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab

MEDA1330 Electrocardiography (1 Credits)
This course introduces the fundamentals of electrocardiography, which includes cardiac anatomy and physiology, the components of the cardiac cycle, and basic heart rhythms. The student learns how to perform a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) while working in a simulated laboratory setting. The course is targeted to medical assistant and phlebotomy students, allied health students, and current health care workers desiring to gain or update their skills in electrocardiography. Prerequisites: Students should have completed coursework containing human anatomy and physiology content such as HCCC1200, BIOL1030, BIOL2021, or BIOL 2022 (or permission from instructor) (1 Cr - 1 lect 0 lab)

MEDA1340 Dosage Calculations (1 Credits)
This course prepares the medical assistant student for dosage calculations used in the administration of medications. An emphasis is placed on mastering math skills necessary for administration of medications and conversions between English and Metric systems, solving ratio and proportion problems, and working with percentages. The student is introduced to reading oral and parenteral dosages. Prerequisites: Basic mathematical computations with an Accuplacer cut score of 71 or better in Elementary Algebra ***STUDENTS MUST PASS THIS COURSE BY 90% OR BETTER (1 Cr - 1 lect)

MEDA1350 Pharmacology (2 Credits)
This course introduces the medical assistant student to pharmacological concepts, drug classifications, and the effects of drugs on patients. Principles of safe and accurate administration of medications by various routes are emphasized. Classroom and laboratory simulations are used to teach basic methods of safe drug administration. Prerequisites: MEDA1340 or co-enrollment (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

MEDA1500 Medical Assistant Practicum (6 Credits)
This course is for the medical assistant student who has successfully completed all other Medical Assistant Program requirements. The initial part of this course focuses on the role of the medical assistant in relation to the following areas: medical practices, community resources, patient education, teamwork, customer relations and leadership skills in a simulated clinical environment. The remainder of the course is designed to provide on-the-job experience. The student is assigned to work in a physician¿s office for a total of 6 semester credits. The student will work under the supervision of office personnel performing tasks pertinent to the student¿s technical program. Prerequisites: successful completion of all other Medical Assistant Program coursework 6 Cr - 1 lect, 5 credits on-the-job training (minimum 200 hours)

MFGT1000 Safety and OSHA (2 Credits)
This course covers the thirty hour Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) mandated material required to meet the OSHA 501 standard as well as a five hour forklift training that will certify the successful candidate to operate a forklift for three years. The course will prepare the student to take the 501 OSHA certification test as well as the Manufacturing Skills Standard (MSSC) Assessment in Safety. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MFGT1010 Quality Processes (2 Credits)
This course covers the basic knowledge to understand and start adopting quality concepts for an entry level worker into a manufacturing environment. Topics introduced include lean concepts, six sigma and other quality models. The course also prepares the student to take the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council (MSSC) Assessment in Quality. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MFGT2000 Maintenance Concepts (2 Credits)
This course covers basic concepts in maintenance such as lubrication, visual inspection, repairs and troubleshooting. A student taking the course will be able to distinguish between the different types of maintenance such as preventive maintenance, routine and predictive maintenance. In addition the student will learn about some common tools and safety devices used in the maintenance of machinery. The course finally prepares the student to take the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council (MSSC) Assessment in Maintenance. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MFGT2010 Manufacturing Processes and Production (2 Credits)
This course covers a broad range of production processes and practices. Some of the concepts introduced include the Employee Right to Know training, production types, and Maintenance fundamentals. The course also prepares the student to take the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council (MSSC) Assessment in Manufacturing Processes and Production. (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1101 Music Theory/SS/ET I (4 Credits)
This course is the first semester of music theory designed for music students, elementary education students, or anyone desiring to learn the basics of music and to develop or improve skills in reading and notating music. It includes pitch and rhythmic notation, major, minor and modal scales, key signatures, triads, beginning melody and harmonization. This course also integrates sight singing and ear training. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1102 Music Theory/SS/ET II (4 Credits)
This is the second semester of music theory designed for music students or anyone desiring to learn the theoretical aspects of music and to improve skills in reading and notating music. Emphasis is given to harmonic and melodic structure and cadences. This course also integrates sight-singing and ear training. Prerequisite: MUSC1101 or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1111 Survey of Music (3 Credits)
This course is a survey of music and musical style from the beginning of recorded music history through the present. It includes a brief introduction to musical elements and is designed for the student who has little or no training in music. It combines instruction in musical terminology with extensive, critical listening along with an overview of the history of Western music. MnTC (Goal 6/HU and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1114 American Popular Music (3 Credits)
This course is a study of popular music in America from around 1750 to the present. Subjects studied are musical elements, historical and social perspectives, and genres and styles of popular music including the music of the slaves, music of early white America, music of the Civil War, post-Civil War, black music, Tin Pan Alley, Dixieland, Big Band, Blues, Pop, Jazz, Rock 'n Roll, Rock, and contemporary styles.MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1121 Austin Symphony Orchestra (1 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity for student instrumentalists to perform in the Austin Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra gives five or six performances throughout the academic year and plays a variety of music including standard orchestral literature. Auditions are held at the start of fall semester each year. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1122 Austin Symphony Orchestra (1 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity for student instrumentalists to perform in the Austin Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra gives five or six performances throughout the academic year and plays a variety of music including standard orchestral literature. Auditions are held at the start of fall semester each year. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1123 College Choir (1 Credits)
This course is a choir that studies and performs works from the broad spectrum of choral literature. Instruction emphasizes healthy choral/vocal techniques, improved note and score reading, and expanded knowledge of musical notation, terminology, and styles. This ensemble rehearses four hours per week and does not require an audition. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1124 College Choir (1 Credits)
This course is a choir that studies and performs works from the broad spectrum of choral literature. Instruction emphasizes healthy choral/vocal techniques, improved note and score reading, and expanded knowledge of musical notation, terminology, and styles. This ensemble rehearses four hours per week and does not require an audition. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1125 Instrumental Ensemble (1 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity to perform as a member of an instrumental ensemble. The group, or groups, vary in size and scope according to student interest, and may include jazz, traditional band, rock, and/or other musical styles. Students are encouraged to audition and/or meet with the instructor prior to the start of the semester. This ensemble rehearses two hours per week. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1126 Instrumental Ensemble (1 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity to perform as a member of an instrumental ensemble. The group, or groups, vary in size and scope according to student interest, and may include jazz, traditional band, rock, and/or other musical styles. Students are encouraged to audition and/or meet with the instructor prior to the start of the semester. This ensemble rehearses two hours per week. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1127 Vocal Ensemble "Frequency" (1 Credits)
The Vocal Ensemble "Frequency" is an auditioned group of vocalists and instrumentalists that performs concerts and represents the college at functions throughout the region. The repertoire studied encompasses a variety of styles including: jazz, popular, traditional, and Broadway. This ensemble rehearses three hours per week, culminating in at least one major concert performance each semester. Prerequisite: Student must also be enrolled in MUSC 1123 or MUSC 2123. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1128 Vocal Ensemble "Frequency" (1 Credits)
The Vocal Ensemble "Frequency" is an auditioned group of vocalists and instrumentalists that performs concerts and represents the college at functions throughout the region. The repertoire studied encompasses a variety of styles including: jazz, popular, traditional, and Broadway. This ensemble rehearses three hours per week, culminating in at least one major concert performance each semester. Prerequisite: Student must also be enrolled in MUSC 1124 or MUSC 2124. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1130 Participation in Music (1 Credits)
This course is for students investing substantial time in musical performance i.e. being in the cast or orchestra for a major musical or other significant musical event. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1131 Participation in Music (1 Credits)
This course is for students investing substantial time in musical performance i.e. being in the cast or orchestra for a major musical or other significant musical event. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1132 Recorder Consort (1 Credits)
The student and instructor will arrange a time for one 1/2 hour class per week during the semester. Skills learned will depend upon the level of the student and his/her musical background. The expectation of the class will be performance in a recital or for college functions, like the annual Yuletide Feaste. (1Cr)

MUSC1133 Recorder Consort (1 Credits)
The student and instructor will arrange a time for one 1/2 hour class per week during the semester. Skills learned will depend upon the level of the student and his/her musical background. The expectation is performance in a recital or college function, like the annual Yuletide Feaste. (1Cr)

MUSC1140 Guitar Class I (1 Credits)
This course emphasizes the fundamentals of guitar technique and performance for the beginning guitar student. Instruction is presented in a lecture/application format in a group setting. Each student is responsible for providing his/her own acoustic guitar for use in the class sessions. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1145 Piano Class I (2 Credits)
This course is designed for the student who has little or no training in the art of piano playing and music reading. Emphasis will be on reading and performing pitch and rhythm notation; exploration of the basic elements of melody, harmony, rhythm, and form; and will include introductory exercises in the areas of composition and improvisation. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1146 Piano Class II (2 Credits)
This course is a continuation of MUSC 1145 Piano Class I. It is designed for the student who has had fundamental training in the art of piano playing and music reading. Emphasis will continue to be placed on reading and performing musical notation with further exploration of the basic elements of melody, harmony, rhythm, and form. It will include exercises in the areas of composition and improvisation and expansion of technical control and facility. Prerequisite: MUSC 1145 or instructor approval. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1150 Applied Voice Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private voice instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of healthy, expressive vocal technique; study of vocal literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this class. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1151 Applied Voice Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private voice instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of healthy, expressive vocal technique; study of vocal literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this class. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1160 Applied Piano Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private piano instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1161 Applied Piano Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private piano instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1162 Applied Organ Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private organ instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive keyboard technique; study of keyboard literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1163 Applied Organ Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private organ instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive keyboard technique; study of keyboard literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1170 Applied Percussion Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private percussion instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1171 Applied Percussion Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private percussion instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1172 Applied Strings Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private strings instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1173 Applied Strings Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private strings instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1174 Applied Woodwinds Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private woodwinds instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1175 Applied Woodwinds Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private woodwinds instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1176 Applied Brass Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private brass instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1177 Applied Brass Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private brass instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1178 Applied Guitar Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private guitar instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique, study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods, and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC1179 Applied Guitar Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private guitar instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique, study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods, and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2103 Music Theory/SS/ET III (4 Credits)
This course represents the third semester of the theory, sight-singing, and ear training sequence. Emphasis is given to practical application of smaller structures (i.e. scales, intervals, and chords) to larger formal structures. It includes study of more complex chords and an emphasis on larger forms, particularly as applied to the music of the Renaissance through Romantic style periods. This course also includes the continued study of sight-singing and ear training. Prerequisite: MUSC 1102 or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2104 Music Theory/SS/ET IV (4 Credits)
This course represents the fourth semester of the theory, sight-singing, and ear training sequence. Emphasis is given to practical application of smaller structures (i.e. scales, intervals, and chords) to larger formal structures. It includes study of more complex chords and an emphasis on larger forms, particularly as applied to the music of the late Romantic style period through styles of the present day. This course also includes the continued study of sight-singing and ear training. Prerequisite: MUSC 2103 or instructor approval. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2121 Austin Symphony Orchestra (1 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity for student instrumentalists to perform in the Austin Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra gives five or six performances throughout the academic year and plays a variety of music including standard orchestral literature. Auditions are held at the start of fall semester each year. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2122 Austin Symphony Orchestra (1 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity for student instrumentalists to perform in the Austin Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra gives five or six performances throughout the academic year and plays a variety of music including standard orchestral literature. Auditions are held at the start of fall semester each year. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2123 College Choir (1 Credits)
This course is a choir that studies and performs works from the broad spectrum of choral literature. Instruction emphasizes healthy choral/vocal techniques, improved note and score reading, and expanded knowledge of musical notation, terminology, and styles. This ensemble rehearses four hours per week and does not require an audition. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2124 College Choir (1 Credits)
This course is a choir that studies and performs works from the broad spectrum of choral literature. Instruction emphasizes healthy choral/vocal techniques, improved note and score reading, and expanded knowledge of musical notation, terminology, and styles. This ensemble rehearses four hours per week and does not require an audition. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2125 Instrumental Ensemble (1 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity to perform as a member of an instrumental ensemble. The group, or groups, vary in size and scope according to student interest, and may include jazz, traditional band, rock, and/or other musical styles. Students are encouraged to audition and/or meet with the instructor prior to the start of the semester. This ensemble rehearses two hours per week. MnTC (Goals 2/CT and 6/HU); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2126 Instrumental Ensemble (1 Credits)
This course provides the opportunity to perform as a member of an instrumental ensemble. The group, or groups, vary in size and scope according to student interest, and may include jazz, traditional band, rock, and/or other musical styles. Students are encouraged to audition and/or meet with the instructor prior to the start of the semester. This ensemble rehearses two hours per week. MnTC (Goals 2/CT and 6/HU); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2127 Vocal Ensemble "Frequency" (1 Credits)
The Vocal Ensemble "Frequency" is an auditioned group of vocalists and instrumentalists that performs concerts and represents the college at functions throughout the region. The repertoire studied encompasses a variety of styles including: jazz, popular, traditional, and Broadway. This ensemble rehearses three hours per week, culminating in at least one major concert performance each semester. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2128 Vocal Ensemble "Frequency" (1 Credits)
The Vocal Ensemble "Frequency" is an auditioned group of vocalists and instrumentalists that performs concerts and represents the college at functions throughout the region. The repertoire studied encompasses a variety of styles including: jazz, popular, traditional, and Broadway. This ensemble rehearses three hours per week, culminating in at least one major concert performance each semester. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2130 Participation in Music (1 Credits)
This course is for students investing substantial time in musical performance i.e. being in the cast or orchestra for a major musical or other significant musical event. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2131 Participation in Music (1 Credits)
This course is for students investing substantial time in musical performance i.e. being in the cast or orchestra for a major musical or other significant musical event. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2132 Recorder Consort (1 Credits)
The student and instructor will arrange a time for one 1/2 hour class per week during the semester. Skills learned will depend upon the level of the student and his/her musical background. The expectation of the class will be performance in a recital or for college functions, like the annual Yuletide Feaste. (1Cr)

MUSC2133 Recorder Consort (1 Credits)
The student and instructor will arrange a time for one 1/2 hour class per week during the semester. Skills learned will depend upon the level of the student and his/her musical background. The expectation is performance in a recital or college function, like the annual Yuletide Feaste. (1Cr)

MUSC2150 Applied Voice Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private voice instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of healthy, expressive vocal technique; study of vocal literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this class. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2151 Applied Voice Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private voice instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of healthy, expressive vocal technique; study of vocal literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this class. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2160 Applied Piano Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private piano instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2161 Applied Piano Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private piano instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2162 Applied Organ Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private organ instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive keyboard technique; study of keyboard literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2163 Applied Organ Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private organ instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive keyboard technique; study of keyboard literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2170 Applied Percussion Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private percussion instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2171 Applied Percussion Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private percussion instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2172 Applied Strings Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private strings instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2173 Applied Strings Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private strings instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2174 Applied Woodwinds Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private woodwinds instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2175 Applied Woodwinds Lessons (1 Credits)
Private woodwinds instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2176 Applied Brass Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private brass instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2177 Applied Brass Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private brass instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique; study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods; and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2178 Applied Guitar Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private guitar instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique, study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods, and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2179 Applied Guitar Lessons (1 Credits)
This course in private guitar instruction is individualized to each student's needs and includes development of facile, expressive playing technique, study of music literature representing varied styles and historical periods, and development of affective, artistically informed performance skills. The student must arrange a time for one 30-minute lesson per week throughout the semester. A special fee is charged in addition to tuition for this course. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2199 AFA Portfolio (1 Credits)
This course is intended to be the culmination of two years of musical study and represents the capstone of the Associate in Fine Arts degree. The student will create his/her own portfolio using a current form of media technology as a capstone project. This course will include the presentation of a half-recital or project of a similar scope, as appropriate to the student's focus and as approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2295 The Culture in London-London Dash Light (2 Credits)
This course is a choir that studies and performs works from the broad spectrum of choral literature. Instruction emphasizes healthy choral/vocal techniques, improved note and score reading, and expanded knowledge of musical notation, terminology, and styles. This ensemble rehearses four hours per week and does not require an audition. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2297 The Culture in London-London Dash (4 Credits)
British culture comes alive as students experience London and the surrounding area. This travel/study opportunity gives students a first-hand look at British theater, art, music, and daily culture. Tour with faculty members, or discover on your own, the great sights of London, including Trafalgar Square, the Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, the British Museum, and historic sites. At night you may see The Royal Shakespeare Company or hear some of the world's greatest symphonies. Pre-dash classes help prepare students to gain the most from an exciting and memorable trip to what many call the world's greatest city. A short journey to Paris from London is also available. A special fee is charges to cover travel expense. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

MUSC2600 USA Cultural Studies (2 Credits)
This travel/study trip will allow participants to encounter the cultural offerings of one of the USA's most vibrant cities for five days and four nights. Experienced faculty will provide a survey of exhibitions and performances in art, music, and theatre, as well as historical background and practical guidance. This trip offers access to arts experts and cultural experiences not available to most travelers or commercial tour groups, while allowing flexibility for exploration of individual interests. A special fee is charged to cover travel expenses. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

N/A  (0 Credits)


NURS1010 Medication Administration (2 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the legalities, scope of practice, drug pharmacology, abbreviations, and rights of medication administration. Skill focus is on oral and enteral, optic, otic, mucosal, percutaneous, and parenteral routes of medication administration. Correct medication administration including application of knowledge regarding safety, pharmacology, dose calculation, nursing process, patient teaching, and correlation of lab values are emphasized. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing Program. Co-requistite: NURS 1020 and BIOL 2021. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

NURS1020 Concepts of Nursing (8 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the discipline of nursing and focuses on basic nursing concepts and skills in caring for the adult and geriatric client. Principles of caring, critical thinking, nursing process, communication, nursing roles, accountability, and practice issues are incorporated into this course. Basic end of life care and therapeutic interventions are explored. Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing Program. Co-requisites: NURS 1010 and BIOL 2021. (8 Cr - 4 lect, 4 lab/clinical)

NURS1030 Family Nursing (4 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the childbearing and childrearing family. Students study psychosocial, normal physical, and abnormal conditions of pregnancy, the health and illness of children, and the influence of the community on the family. Theories of growth and development are applied to direct patient care. Students apply critical thinking, therapeutic communication skills, nursing interventions and the holistic approach in caring for childbearing and childrearing families. The clinical component includes on-campus lab and community-based care in maternal and pediatric settings. Prerequisites: NURS 1010 and NURS 1020. Co-requisites: NURS 1040 and BIOL 2022. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab/clinical)

NURS1040 Med/Surg & Psycho-Social Nursing (9 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the childbearing and childrearing family. Students study psychosocial, normal physical, and abnormal conditions of pregnancy, the health and illness of children, and the influence of the community on the family. Theories of growth and development are applied to direct patient care. Students apply critical thinking, therapeutic communication skills, nursing interventions and the holistic approach in caring for childbearing and childrearing families. The clinical component includes on-campus lab and community-based care in maternal and pediatric settings. Prerequisites: NURS 1010 and NURS 1020. Co-requisites: NURS 1040 and BIOL 2022. (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab/clinical)

NURS1111 Options for Success (1 Credits)
This course facilitates successful entry into the program. Students benefiting from this course include students transferring into the program at all points and students who have exited the program and are now asking for re-admission after a protracted absence. Requirements of the course are individually tailored through discussion between the student and the nursing faculty to meet the unique needs of the particular student. All students in this course will meet the objectives. The course meets for 16 hours with the nursing faculty member for each credit. Additional out-of-class assignments may be given on an as needed basis. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing Program. (1-4 Cr - either/or 1-4 lect, 1-4 lab)

NURS1115 Clinical Internship (1 Credits)
This course applies nursing theory to clinical nursing practice. The focus of this course is to increase the depth of understanding about the role of the nurse as well as master clinical skills. Students must have a nurse preceptor in the clinical setting and be monitored by nursing faculty. This course fulfills the Minnesota Board of Nursing rule: 6305.0300 Authorization to Practice Nursing Subpart 1B. Prerequisites: Successful completion of two semesters of an associate degree nursing program. The student must show proof of acceptance into an approved clinical internship program and the instructor. Prerequisite: Successful completion of two semesters of an Associate Degree Nursing Program. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

NURS2000 PN to ADN Nurse Transitions (3 Credits)
This course facilitates the transition from practical nursing role to the role of the professional nurse. Content covered in this course supplements and augments materials offered in a practical nursing program and prepares students to continue professional nursing education. To qualify for this course students must meet the criteria for admission to the licensed practical nurse (LPN) to associates degree (AD) Option. See current criteria on the Riverland website. Successful completion of this course enables the student to enter NURS 2010 and NURS 2020. Prerequisites: The applicant must have 21 of the 30 general education credits COMPLETED within the nursing curriculum with a "C" or better. Those 21 COMPLETED credits MUST INCLUDE COMPLETION OF: BIOL 2021 Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 2022 Anatomy and Physiology II, and must have been completed within the past five years. Courses in progress will not be considered. Students who meet the criteria listed above, but who have not been accepted into the program because of current lack of seats in the class, may take this course with the permission of the Nursing Program Director. These students have no guarantee of a seat in the fall semester nursing classes. If this occurs, this course will only apply towards admission for one year. PLEASE NOTE: Students must have been admitted to the nursing program before they can register for any NURS course. Prerequisite: Licensed Practical Nurse. (LPN). (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

NURS2010 Community, Leadership & Advanced Med/Surg (8 Credits)
This course introduces and outlines the scope of practice of the professional registered nurse (RN) and aids the student in developing an understanding of the professional level of nursing care required for the client with obstetric complications, advanced psychiatric, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, endocrine, and hematological disorders across the care continuum. The concepts of nursing process, nursing management, ethical legal issues, leadership principles, priority setting, discharge planning, client teaching, and health promotion pertaining to the client, family, and community are applied to these situations. Prerequisites: NURS 2000 if PN Mobility student, or NURS 1010, NURS 1020, NURS 1030, and NURS 1040 if PN Diploma student, BIOL 2021 and BIOL 2022. Co-requisites: NURS 2020 and BIOL 2050. (8 Cr - 4 lect, 4 clinical)

NURS2020 Health Assessment (2 Credits)
This course focuses on a holistic approach to health and physical assessment across the lifespan. Students perform a comprehensive health history and physical examination. The understanding of developmental, psychological, social-cultural, and environmental influences is emphasized. Critical thinking skills are used to analyze data from a health history based on Gordon's Function Health Patterns, subjective findings from the interview, and objective physical examination findings. Basic interviewing techniques, physical examination skills, documentation of data, and health teaching methods are practiced in the lab setting. Prerequisites: NURS 2000 if PN Mobility student, or NURS 1010, NURS 1020, NURS 1030, and NURS 1040 if PN Diploma student, BIOL 2021 and BIOL 2022. Co-requisites: NURS 2010 and BIOL 2050. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

NURS2030 Service Learning (1 Credits)
This elective nursing course applies nursing theory in the community. his course introduces the students to the theory and foundation of service learning related to community health needs. The students collaborate with local agencies to define needs and to deliver services. Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing Program. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

NURS2040 Acute Care Across the Lifespan (8 Credits)
This course builds on previous course work incorporating the scope of professional nursing practice, planning for nursing care, nursing management, leadership skills, and preparing the client for care in the community setting. Emphasis is on assessment and provision of care for individuals or groups of clients with complex physiological and psychological needs. Modules include care of the client with emergent respiratory, neurological, cardiovascular needs, care of the trauma client, the role of the forensic nurse, and transitioning to the role of the professional nursing graduate. Prerequisites: ENGL 1101, PSYC 1105, NURS 2010 and NURS 2020. Co-requisite: BIOL 2040, PHIL 1130, and ENGL 1105. (8 Cr - 4 lect, 4 lab/clinical)

NURS2050 Nursing Preceptorship (1 Credits)
This elective nursing course provides opportunities to apply nursing theory to clinical nursing practice. It is required that the student complete an application and be accepted into the NURS 2050 course, based on clinical site and preceptor availability. The focus of this course is to increase the student's depth of understanding about the role of the professional nurse as well as master clinical skills. Students must have a nurse preceptor in the clinical setting and be monitored by nursing faculty. The faculty and the preceptor use a clinical evaluation tool to collaboratively assess attainment of the course outcomes. This course fulfills the clinical requirements for NURS 2040 with addition of 32 clinical hours for NURS 2050. Prerequisites: NURS 2010 and NURS 2020. Co-requisite: NURS 2040. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab/clinical)

NURS2060 Transcultural Nursing (1 Credits)
This elective nursing course focuses on culturally competent nursing care in a multicultural society. The diversity of cultural beliefs, values, and practices impacting the health of individuals and groups are examined. Students travel to supervised clinical sites and apply theoretical concepts to practice while gaining clinical experience in a culturally diverse environment. Students incorporate components of the learning process related to culturally diverse communities with an emphasis on holistic care. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing Program. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab/clinical)

NURS2070 International Transcultural Nursing (2 Credits)
This elective course provides an opportunity to experience a direct relationship with healthcare providers and recipients from various cultural backgrounds in an international setting. Students travel to supervised sites for theoretical concepts as well as clinical experiences. Students gain valuable components of learning process relating to culturally diverse communities with emphasis on holistic care. Prerequisite: Nursing student or instructor approval. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab/clinical)

NURS2700 Foundations of Nursing-Health Promotion (9 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the role of the professional nurse. The emphasis on health promotion across the lifespan includes learning about self-health, as well as holistic client health practices. Students learn to access and apply research evidence to guide safe preventative care. The student will incorporate communication and growth and development theory in a caring and culturally sensitive manner. The student will work as an ethical member of multi-disciplinary teams giving and receiving feedback about performance and use reflective thinking about their practice. Within the context of the nursing process, populations studied will include children, adults, older adults and the family experiencing a normal pregnancy. Co-requisite: NURS 2750 Nutrition and the Role of the Professional Nurse. (9 Cr – 4 lect; 3 clinical; 2 lab)

NURS2700 Foundations of Nursing Health Promotion (9 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the role of the professional nurse. The emphasis on health promotion across the lifespan includes learning about self-health, as well as holistic client health practices. Students learn to access and apply research evidence to guide safe preventative care. The student will incorporate communication and growth and development theory in a caring and culturally sensitive manner. The student will work as an ethical member of multi-disciplinary teams giving and receiving feedback about performance and use reflective thinking about their practice. Within the context of the nursing process, populations studied will include children, adults, older adults and the family experiencing a normal pregnancy. Co-requisite: NURS 2750 Nutrition and the Role of the Professional Nurse. (9 Cr – 4 lect; 3 clinical; 2 lab)

NURS2720 Transition to the Role of the Professional Nurse (4 Credits)
This course is designed to expand the knowledge and skills of the LPN as they transition to the professional role within nursing. Emphasis is placed on health promotion through the lifespan and incorporates theories related to evidence-based practice, quality and safety, communication, collaboration, clinical decision-making/reasoning, informatics, assessment, caring, and health- illness continuum. (4 Cr – 3 lect; 1 clinical/lab)

NURS2750 Nutrition and the Role of the Professional Nurse (2 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the role of the nurse in promoting and supporting nutritional health. Emphasis is on the role nutrition plays in health promotion/prevention of illness, recovery from acute illness and/or management of chronic illness. Students learn to access evidence to support healthy nutritional choices that reduce risk factors for disease and/or illness across the lifespan. Students explore how culture, ethnicity, socio-economic status, nutritional trends and controversies, and integrative therapies influence the nutritional health of the client. Co-requisite: NURS 2700 Foundations of Nursing – Health Promotion. (2Cr – 2 lect)

NURS2800 Chronic and Palliative Care (7 Credits)
This course focuses on the nursing care of clients experiencing chronic illness and/or end of life experiences. Emphasis is placed on understanding the “lived experience” of clients and families. Ethical issues related to advocacy, self-determination, and autonomy are explored. Evidence-based practice is used to support appropriate focused assessments and management of care of clients experiencing concurrent illnesses/co-morbidities. Co-requisite: NURS2820 Pharmacology and the Role of the Professional Nurse; NURS2850 Applied Pathophysiology for Nursing I; (7 Cr – 3 lect; 3 clinical; 1 lab)

NURS2820 Pharmacology and the Role of the Professional Nurse (3 Credits)
This course introduces theoretical concepts that enable students to provide safe and effective care related to pharmaceuticals and natural products to diverse clients across the lifespan. A framework is presented for approaching the study of pharmacotherapeutics including pharmaceutical research and regulation, quality and safety, major drug classifications, and clinical management. Co-requisite: NURS2800 Chronic and Palliative Care, NURS2850 Applied Pathophysiology for Nursing I (3Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab, 0 other)

NURS2850 Applied Pathophysiology for Nursing I (2 Credits)
This course introduces a holistic perspective of pathophysiological processes and the disruption in normal body function. Emphasis will be on objective and subjective manifestations of common chronic health problems resulting from environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptations to provide a foundation for nursing care. This course complements selected topics addressed in Chronicity and End of Life to provide a comprehensive understanding of disease processes. Co-requisite: NURS 2800 Chronic and Palliative Care; NURS2820 Pharmacology and the Role of the Professional Nurse (2Cr – 2 lect)

NURS2900 Acute and Complex Care Illness (7 Credits)
This course focuses on the nursing care of clients experiencing acute disruptions of health and/or end of life issues. Emphasis is placed on understanding and application of theory and skills required to provide nursing care to clients with complex and/or unstable conditions. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is used to support appropriate focused assessments, and effective, efficient nursing interventions. Knowledge of life span, developmental factors, cultural variables and legal aspects of care guide the ethical decision making in delivery of care. Co-requisite: NURS2920 Applied Pathophysiology for Nursing II; NURS2950 Nursing Leadership I (7Cr – 3 lect; 3 clinical; 1 lab)

NURS2920 Applied Pathophysiology for Nursing II (2 Credits)
This course will facilitate ongoing critical thinking and analysis of pathophysiological concepts. Emphasis will be on interpretation and prioritization of data resulting from environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptation. This course complements the selected topics addressed in Acute and Complex Care to provide a comprehensive understanding of disease processes. Co-requisite Acute and Complex Care (2 Cr – 2 lect)

NURS2950 Nursing Leadership I (3 Credits)
This course focuses on prioritization, delegation, and supervision of nursing care of clients across the lifespan. Healthcare policy, finance, and regulatory environment issues are analyzed. Emphasis is on planning, collaborating and coordinating care for individuals and groups across the care continuum. Co-requisite: NURS2900 Acute and Complex Care; NURS2920 Applied Pathophysiology for Nursing II (3 Cr – 2 lect; 1 clinical)

PHED1104 Racquet Sports (1 Credits)
This course will introduce students to basic fundamentals of tennis and badminton. Strokes, rules, terminology and scoring will be required at appropriate times during play. Students will be able to apply strategies to singles and doubles play. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1106 Bowling (1 Credits)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of the game of bowling Proper techniques, terminology and game play will be included. Also included will be proper etiquette, types of games, basic rules and scoring. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1107 Walking and Jogging for Fitness (1 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce the student to various aspects of both walking and jogging activities. Topics to be covered include stretching, form, technique, fitness principles, general safety, and proper equipment needed for jogging and fitness walking. The course helps students to develop lifelong fitness programs by developing and understanding aerobic principles, cardiovascular conditioning, nutrition, and performance enhancement. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1108 Golf (1 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the rules and techniques of golf. Proper grip, stance, posture, swing, etiquette, and proper scoring will be included. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1112 Zumba (1 Credits)
This course introduces students to a Latin-inspired, dance-fitness class that incorporates International music and dance movements, which create a dynamic, exciting, and effective fitness system. This course combines fast and slow rhythms that tone and sculpt the body in an aerobic/fitness fashion to achieve cardio and muscle-toning benefits. (1cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1117 Weight Lifting (1 Credits)
This course teaches fundamental isotonic and isometric exercises along with specific exercises to meet the needs of the student. A program will be designed to develop and maintain the student's physique, efficiency and movement, and fitness for daily living. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1121 Tae Kwon Do - Karate (1 Credits)
This course focuses on Tae Kwon Do - Karate, a martial art from Korea. It is means of self-defense and provides excellent healthful exercise as well as a way of gaining confidence, self control, and mental discipline. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1122 Cardio Kick Boxing (1 Credits)
This course introduces the student to theory, movement, and outcomes of the skill of combining martial arts techniques with aerobic conditioning. Students will have the opportunity to test individual skills through a series of physical tests. The course provides an introduction to life-long skills for conditioning and health. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1124 Introduction to Pilates (1 Credits)
This course introduces students to the philosophies, principles, and exercises behind Joseph Pilates' mat work. The course will provide students with an introduction to life-long skill for integrating body and mind to create a completely balanced body. This introductory course requires class discussion while participating in basic, active Pilates movements. The activities are basic but require physical effort. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1145 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness (2 Credits)
This course is designed to assist students in creating an individualized fitness program which meets their needs and lifestyle. Topics covered are overall wellness, psychological and physiological benefits derived from fitness, components of fitness, fitness assessments, and strengthening the areas necessary. Nutrition and how it must be balanced with an exercise program for success in weight loss, gain, or maintenance will be covered. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1150 Fitness Activities (1 Credits)
This course is centered on participation and the acquisition of skills in aerobic and anaerobic activities such as weight lifting, cardiovascular endurance exercises, stretching, Pilates and/or yoga. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1172 Step and Aerobics (1 Credits)
This course focuses on the introduction of basic combinations of stepping and arm movements. Participants will have the opportunity to gain a high intensity, cardiovascular workout with this low impact activity along with mat exercises for muscle toning. Intensity is self-controlled through the selection of step height and amount of arm movement. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED1212 Team Sports and Activities (2 Credits)
This course will expose students to various team games such as basketball, volleyball, ultimate frisbee, soccer, softball, and flag football. Skills, strategies, rules, and basic officiating will provide the student with general competencies in these team games. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

PHED2160 Intro to Physical Education Studies (2 Credits)
This course is an introduction to K12 physical education and sport as well as other related human performance studies including exercise science, park and recreation, athletic training, sport management and coaching. History, philosophy, ethics and values, as well as career opportunities and trends in these related fields, will also be covered. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PHED2180 Psychological and Social Aspects of Sport (3 Credits)
A study of sport from a psychological and social perspective for coaches and individuals who participate in physical activity and sport or those interested in careers in this area. This course will include the issues that confront the world of sport and their effects on society as a whole. Variables such as societal values, motivation, and stress along with their effects on the character and performance of sport will also be studied. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PHED2213 Coaching and Officiating Basketball (2 Credits)
This course is designed for anyone interested in pursuing coaching and/or officiating basketball at any level. Included will be program planning, drill and skill work, and coaching philosophy as well as rules and officiating. Some practical settings will be used through practice observation, clinic speakers, teaching opportunities, and classroom projects in preparation to eventually officiate and/or coach. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

PHED2214 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (2 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the prevention and care of athletic related injuries for coaches, athletes, exercise enthusiasts, or those interested in human performance fields. Athletic related injury recognition and management as well as techniques in taping will be included. (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

PHED2215 Coaching & Officiating Baseball/Softball (2 Credits)
This course is designed for anyone interested in pursuing coaching and/or officiating baseball at any level. Included will be program planning, drill and skill work, coaching philosophy as well as rules and officiating. Some practical settings will be used through practice observation, clinic speakers, teaching opportunities, and classroom projects to prepare you to eventually officiate and/or coach. (2 credits, 2 lec, 0 lab)

PHED2230 Intercollegiate Basketball I/Men's (1 Credits)
This course allows the student athlete to participate in basketball at an intercollegiate level including practices, games, and travel. Riverland Community College intercollegiate basketball participates in the Minnesota College Athletic Conference (MCAC) and is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED2231 Intercollegiate Baseball (1 Credits)
This course provides the athlete an opportunity to participate in baseball on an intercollegiate level versus junior colleges participating in the Minnesota Community Athletic College and the surrounding area outside the conference. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED2232 Intercollegiate Basketball I/Women's (1 Credits)
This course allows the student athlete to participate in basketball at an intercollegiate level including practices, games, and travel. Riverland Community College intercollegiate basketball participates in the Minnesota College Athletic Conference (MCAC) and is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED2234 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 Credits)
This course provides the athlete an opportunity to participate in soccer on an intercollegiate level versus other community colleges participating in the Minnesota College Athletic Conference (MCAC) and is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED2235 Intercollegiate Volleyball I (1 Credits)
This course provides the athlete an opportunity to participate in volleyball on an intercollegiate level versus other community colleges participating in the Minnesota College Athletic Conference (MCAC) and is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). (1 Cr - 0 lec, 1 lab)

PHED2237 Intercollegiate Tennis (1 Credits)
The athlete participates in tennis on an inter-collegiate level versus junior colleges in the Minnesota Community College Conference and the 4-year colleges with the area. (1Cr, 1 lab)

PHED2239 Intercollegiate Softball I (1 Credits)
This course provides the athlete an opportunity to participate in softball on an intercollegiate level versus other community colleges participating in the Minnesota College Athletic Conference (MCAC) and is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). (1 Cr - 0 lec, 1 lab)

PHED2240 Intercollegiate Basketball II/Men's (1 Credits)
This course allows the student athlete to participate in basketball at an intercollegiate level including practices, games, and travel. Riverland Community College intercollegiate basketball participates in the Minnesota College Athletic Conference (MCAC) and is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). Prerequisite: PHED 2230. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED2242 Intercollegiate Basketball II/Women's (1 Credits)
This course allows the student athlete to participate in basketball at an intercollegiate level including practices, games, and travel. Riverland Community College intercollegiate basketball participates in the Minnesota College Athletic Conference (MCAC) and is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). Prerequisite: PHED 2232. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED2245 Intercollegiate Volleyball II (1 Credits)
This course allows the student athlete to participate in volleyball at an intercollegiate level including practices, games, and travel. Riverland Community College intercollegiate volleyball participates in the Minnesota College Athletic Conference (MCAC) and is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). Prerequisite: PHED 2235. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHED2249 Intercollegiate Softball II (1 Credits)
This course provides the athlete an opportunity to participate in softball on an intercollegiate level versus other community colleges participating in the Minnesota College Athletic Conference (MCAC) and is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). Prerequisite: PHED 2239. (1 Cr - 0 lec, 1 lab)

PHIL1100 Logic (3 Credits)
This course introduces the student to formal logical reasoning. Students learn how to translate sentences from a natural language into a formal logical language, and use truth-functional logic and natural deduction systems to prove validity. Additionally, students may study syllogistic logic, quantification theory, informal fallacies and/or principles of inductive reasoning pertaining to analogy, enumerative induction, and hypothesis testing. MnTC (Goals 4 M/A and 2C/T); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PHIL1110 Introduction to Philosophy (3 Credits)
This course focuses on the study of classical and modern philosophical developments and provides an introduction to the basic methods and topics of philosophy. Students study the historical dialogue of philosophical arguments in such fields as metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PHIL1130 Ethics (3 Credits)
This course introduces the student to fundamental ethical principles developed throughout the history of philosophy through the study of classical and modern writings. Students are encouraged and challenged to apply such principles to contemporary issues. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PHIL1140 Health Care/Medical Ethics (3 Credits)
This course provides an overview of central issues in medical ethics. Students investigate the nature of ethics and ethical theories and principles before moving on to examine such topics as medical research and technological developments in medicine. The course will provide both historical and contemporary background on a number of ethical issues in the health-care field and will consider proposed answers to what we should do about the questions they raise. Course delivery may include the presentation and discussion of various ethical and health-care perspectives. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 credits - 3 lecture, 0 lab)

PHIL1150 Philosophy of Social Justice (3 Credits)
This course engages the student in reading and activities intended to explore some of the most fundamental philosophical issues of social justice. Topics include an inquiry into the nature of the state, duties and rights of citizens, and the proper role of the criminal justice system. Philosophical analysis will take place in order to demonstrate the underpinning assumptions and theories behind such issues approaches. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lect)

PHRM1001 Pharmacy Technician Orientation (3 Credits)
This course will orient students to the basic principles of pharmacy practice. Students will become familiar with the role and working environment of the pharmacy technician, in both inpatient and outpatient settings. An introduction to the ethical, legal responsibilities and technical activities of the pharmacy technician will be presented for learning development. (3credits 3 lect, 0 lab)

PHRM1002 Pharmacy Math (3 Credits)
Students will use pharmaceutical measuring systems including apothecary, avoirdupois, and metric systems. Students will also learn basic terminology, abbreviations and units necessary to perform pharmacy calculations. A review of calculations with ratio and proportion, percentages, ratio strength, reducing and enlarging formulas, dilution and concentration problems will be done. Students will learn to calculate the correct oral and parenteral dosages of drugs (and/or amount of ingredients) using information from prescriptions or medication orders. This course is intended to satisfy goals 3 and 4 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Prerequisites-None. (3 Cr - 3 lecture, 0 lab).

PHRM1003 Pharmacology (4 Credits)
Students will gain knowledge of pharmacology, including a systematic approach to names and classifications of drugs and therapeutic agents, their indications and contraindications, mechanisms of action, side effects, drug interactions, and methods of administration of therapeutic agents. This course is intended to satisfy goal 34 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technical training, developed by the American Society of Health System Pharmacists. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

PHRM1004 Pharmacy Non-Sterile Compounding (3 Credits)
This course will enable students to learn general preparation of non-sterile solid and liquid pharmaceutical dosage forms used in the pharmacy. Practical experience in the manipulative and record keeping functions associated with the compounds and dispensing of prescriptions will be provided. This course is intended to satisfy goals 4 and 12 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.3 credits l lecture, 2 lab)

PHRM1005 Ambulatory/Retail Pharmacy Practice (4 Credits)
This course will enable students to practice and review their skills needed to operate effectively in an ambulatory setting. The practice in the ambulatory/retail environment involves activities performed by the student and evaluated by a preceptor. This course is intended to satisfy goals 18, 19, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, and 33 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (4Cr 4 clinic).

PHRM1006 Aseptic Technique and IV preparation (3 Credits)
This course will enable students to learn the operation of an IV admixture program. It will provide practice in a lab setting for preparation of IV medications for distribution and provide a foundation for practical learning. This course is intended to satisfy goals and 12 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (3credits - l lecture, 2 lab Cr.).

PHRM1007 Hospital (Inpatient) Pharmacy Practice (4 Credits)
This course will enable students to practice and review their skills needed to operate effectively in the hospital (inpatient) setting. The practice in the Hospital (inpatient) Pharmacy environment involves activities performed by the student and evaluated by a preceptor. This course is intended to satisfy goals 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29,30, 31, 32, and 33 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (4Cr 4 clinic).

PHRM1008 Pharmacy Law and Ethics (2 Credits)
This course is designed to review the state (Minnesota) and federal law(s) affecting pharmacy practice. The following will be examined: The Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, Federal and State Controlled Substance Acts as regulated by the Food and Drug Administration/Drug Enforcement Agency, Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA), and Health Insurance Privacy and Portability Act (HIPPA). This course is intended to satisfy goals 11 and 29 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (2 Cr 0 lab 2 lecture)

PHRM1009 Intense Hospital Practice (3 Credits)
This course will enable students to intensify their skills needed to operate effectively and efficiently in the hospital setting. The practice in the Hospital Pharmacy environment involves activities performed by the student and evaluated by a preceptor. This course is intended to satisfy goals 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29,30, 31, 32, and 33 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (3Cr 3 clinic).

PHRM1010 Introduction to Community Pharmacy (1 Credits)
In this course students will learn general practices associated with community pharmacy services. Experiences in retail pharmacy, durable medical equipment (DME), home infusion services, compounding pharmacy, mail order pharmacy, and internet pharmacy will be discussed. This course is intended to satisfy goals 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 10, 16, 18, 25, 26, 28, 29, 30, 31, 34, and 35 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health System Pharmacists. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHRM1011 Introduction to Institutional Pharmacy (1 Credits)
In this course students will learn general practices associated with institutional pharmacy services. Experiences in hospital inpatient pharmacy, home health and long term care will be discussed. This course is intended to satisfy goals 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 34,and 35 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health System Pharmacists. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHYS1000 Introduction to Physics (3 Credits)
This course covers the basic concepts and laws that govern everyday physical phenomena. Topics include mechanics, heat, waves, and electricity. An integral part of the course is the performance of laboratory experiments where students attempt experimental verification of the principles that they learn in the theory class. Prerequisites: High school algebra or equivalent college mathematics. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

PHYS1200 Physics of Optics (3 Credits)
In this course the basic physics principles related to various optical phenomena are studied. The understanding of the historical development of various optics-related physical theories is emphasized. Also, special importance is given to the understanding of modern optical physics theory and its application to modern optical devices. Integral to the course is the performance of in-class laboratory experiments verifying the optics principles learned. Prerequisite: High school algebra of equivalent college mathematics. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PHYS1501 College Physics I (4 Credits)
This first course in college physics emphasizes the understanding of basic physics principles related to mechanics and the application of those principles to the solution of physics-related problems. Laboratory work is an essential part of the course. Prerequisite: High school algebra or equivalent college mathematics. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

PHYS1502 College Physics II (4 Credits)
This course is a continuation of College Physics I, PHYS 1501. Topics included in this course are momentum and rotational physics, oscillations and waves, thermal physics, electricity, etc. Prerequisite: PHYS 1501. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

PHYS2101 General Physics I (4 Credits)
This is the first of a two-semester physics course sequence intended primarily for students majoring in engineering, computer science, physics, astronomy, chemistry and other physical science disciplines. Students who have strong mathematical background and plan on majoring in medicine or other health science fields will also benefit from this course. Concurrent registration in its laboratory-based companion course, PHYS 2501, is mandatory. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent enrollment in calculus. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

PHYS2102 General Physics II (4 Credits)
This course is a continuation of General Physics I, PHYS 2101. Topics included are heat, thermodynamics, electricity, and magnetism. Concurrent registration in its laboratory- based companion course, PHYS 2502, is mandatory. Prerequisite: PHYS 2101. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

PHYS2501 General Physics Lab I (1 Credits)
This course is designed to be taken concurrently with the General Physics Theory course sequence, and it is strongly recommended that it be taken with the first of those courses. The overall laboratory course sequence is designed to familiarize students with laboratory techniques and instruments used to perform experiments in physics. Students have the opportunity to test and verify some of the basic principles of physics learned in the theory course. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2101. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PHYS2502 General Physics Lab II (1 Credits)
This course is designed to be taken concurrently with the General Physics Theory course sequence, and it is strongly recommended that it be taken with the second of those courses. The overall laboratory course sequence is designed to familiarize student with laboratory techniques and instruments used to perform experiments in physics. Students have the opportunity to test and verify some of the basic principles of physics learned in the theory course. This lab is a continuation of PHYS 2501. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2102. MnTC (Goal 3/NS and 2/CT); (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

PSCI1010 American Government and Politics (3 Credits)
This course is a study of the United States national government in all of its aspects with special emphasis placed on constitutional theory, major governmental institutions and the national political culture and practice. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PSCI1020 State and Local Government (3 Credits)
This course is a study of the principal concepts, process, and institutions of state and local governments of the United States. Special emphasis will be placed on Minnesota government. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PSCI1030 International Relations (3 Credits)
This is an introduction to international relationships of the modern world. Special emphasis will be placed on long-term trends and on current international developments. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PSYC1105 General Psychology (4 Credits)
This course introduces the student to general topics in psychology and is designed to provide an overview of the field of psychology and human behavior. Topics include psychology as a behavioral science, the scientific method, biological foundations of behavior, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking, language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, lifespan development, social psychology, stress and coping, and a brief overview of psychological disorders and therapies. MnTC (Goal 5/SS and Goal 7/HD); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

PSYC1115 Stress Management and Coping Skills (2 Credits)
This course describes the physical and psychological effects of stressors on the individual; the connection between stress, health and disease; and several methods of decreasing the negative effects of stress on the individual's health. Each student will be encouraged to identify and explore the areas of stress in the student's own life. In addition, each student will have the opportunity to choose and practice several of the stress reduction methods discussed in this course. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

PSYC1200 Current Topics in Psychology (1 Credits)
This course is designed to be an in depth analysis of psychological phenomenon or issues of current importance to society. Examples of topics that may be discussed include (but are not limited to): internet behavior and relationships, sexual deviance, interrogation, terrorism, gender differences, personality and personality disorders, addiction, childhood developmental and psychological disorders, religion and psychopharmacology. Specific topics for each semester will be chosen based on current events and expressed faculty/student interest. Selected topics may be taken for credit in either PSYC or HSER (see course schedule for sections that have this option available). Note: This course may be taken more than one with different topics. (1-3 Cr - 1-3 lect, 0 lab)

PSYC1240 Developmental Psychology (3 Credits)
This course explores human growth and development from the prenatal through adult life stages, including aging and death. Students will examine the interaction between genetics and environment on the individual's physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development. In addition, family, culture and cohort influences will be explored. MnTC (Goal 5/SS and Goal 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PSYC1250 Abnormal Psychology (3 Credits)
This course is an overview of abnormal behavior and mental illness. The format of the course follows the psychiatric diagnostic scheme of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, (current edition) and includes a discussion of symptoms as well as the possible causes of and treatments for various personality and psychological disorders. Legal and social issues concerning abnormal behavior and psychopathology are also presented. Prerequisite: PSYC 1105. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PSYC1260 Introduction to Forensic Psychology (2 Credits)
This introductory course explores the various ways in which psychological principles, theories and research are being applied to the legal system. Students will discuss the application of psychology to forensic populations and situations, including (but not limited to) criminal behavior, crime victims, false confession, interrogation, jury behavior, and eyewitness testimony. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

PSYC2260 Social Psychology (3 Credits)
This course provides an in-depth and comprehensive discussion of how the social environment influences and is influenced by the individual. Topics include (but are not limited to) conforming behavior, attitudes, persuasion, self-perception, aggression, prejudice, pro-social behavior, and interpersonal attraction. MnTC (Goal 5/SS and Goal 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

PTCA1001 Patient Care Associate Orientation (3 Credits)
This course orients students to the basic principles of the Patient Care Associate environment. Students become familiar with the role and working environment of the Patient Care Assistant (PCA), in both inpatient and outpatient settings. An introduction to the core tasks and specific department needs are presented for learning development. Prerequisite: Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

PTCA1002 Patient Care Associate Practice (2 Credits)
This course enables students to further develop Patient Care Associate (PCA) skills. Students strengthen ability to operate effectively and efficiently in the clinic setting. Prerequisites: Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) and PTCA 1001. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

RADT1110 X-ray Operations for Allied Health (3 Credits)
This course introduces the allied health professional to basic x-ray operations, patient care, radiation safety, and production of quality images. The student is introduced to the role of the limited x-ray machine operator in the health care environment. The limited x-ray machine operator (LXMO) is an individual other than a radiologic technologist who performs diagnostic x-ray procedures on selected anatomical sites. The course is designed to provide a knowledge base necessary to perform standard radiographic procedures within a limited scope of practice. Consideration is given to the production of images of optimal diagnostic quality. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Medical Assistant or Practical Nursing curriculum or permission of instructor. 3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab

RADT1210 Introduction to Radiography and Patient Care (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the profession of radiologic technology and has a major emphasis on patient care skills. The student acquires appropriate knowledge and skills in radiography, ethical and legal issues, human diversity, and basic patient care. Prerequisites: Admission into the Radiography Program. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (3 Cr – 3 lect, 1 lab)

RADT1211 Introduction to Radiography and Patient Care (4 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the profession of radiologic technology and has a major emphasis on patient care skills. The student acquires appropriate knowledge and skills in radiography, ethical and legal issues, human diversity, and basic patient care. Prerequisites: Admission into the Radiography Program. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)

RADT1217 Radiographic Pathology (1 Credits)
This course provides the student with an introduction to the concepts of disease and its effect on the human body. Pathology and disease, as they relate to various radiographic procedures, are discussed. Prereq: RADT1213, RADT1231, RADT1241, RADT1281. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

RADT1222 Imaging Technology (3 Credits)
This course provides the student with the knowledge of equipment and technologies routinely used for specialized imaging procedures. Emphasis is placed on the complexity of this equipment. Various recording media and techniques, as well as specialized imaging equipment are described. Prerequisites: RADT 1211, RADT 1231, RADT 1240, and RADT 1281. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

RADT1225 Radiographic Pathology and Medical Terminology (2 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the origins of medical terminology. A word building system is introduced and abbreviations and symbols are discussed. This course introduces the student to the concepts of disease and its effects on the human body. The pathophysiology and radiographic manifestations of common and unusual disorders for each of the body systems are discussed. An orientation to the understanding of radiographic orders and interpretation of diagnostic reports is discussed. This course provides the knowledge and skills to adjust technical factors for obtaining optimal quality images in patients with various underlying pathologic conditions. Prerequisites: Admission into the Radiography Program. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (2 Cr – 2 lect, 0 lab)

RADT1230 Introduction to Forensic Radiography (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the role and responsibility of the forensic radiographer. The focus is on the history and role of forensic radiography in forensic medicine and science, medico-legal aspects, and injury processes and pathologies. The student is introduced to the basic terminology for positioning, the radiographic equipment, and operations. General anatomy and imaging for investigative procedures are introduced. The student reviews diagnostic images from a forensic standpoint to help compile evidence that can later be used in a courtroom setting. The multidisciplinary nature of forensic practice is discussed. Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiography Program or obtain instructor approval prior to registering for this course. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

RADT1231 Radiographic Procedures I (4 Credits)
This course is the first of three radiographic procedures courses. The student is introduced to the basic terminology for positioning, the radiographic equipment, and operations. General anatomy is introduced, and specific positioning procedures of the chest, abdomen, upper limb, shoulder girdle, and lower limb up to and including the knee are covered. Portable radiography is presented. Radiation safety and protection for the technologist and patient are stressed. Radiographs are evaluated for anatomy and positioning. Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiography Program. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab) (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

RADT1235 Radiographic Procedures II (3 Credits)
This course covers radiographic procedures of the femur, pelvic girdle, complete vertebral column, and bony thorax. Pediatric considerations and trauma guidelines are presented. Emphasis will be on anatomy, positioning, radiographic terms, manipulation of radiographic equipment and accessories, and related patient care considerations. Radiographs are evaluated for anatomy and positioning. Skills acquired in Procedures I are maintained. Prerequisites: RADT 1211, RADT 1213, RADT 1231, RADT 1241, RADT 1281, and RADT 1100. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

RADT1240 Introduction to Radiographic Equipment/Exposures (3 Credits)
This course provides the student with the knowledge of factors that govern and influence image quality. Topics include history of radiography, basic physics concepts, radiographic equipment, properties of x-rays, exposure factors, digital radiography, radiographic devices, and Automatic Exposure Control (AEC). The application of radiographic calculations is applied during presentation of the course material. Prerequisites: Admission into the Radiography Program. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

RADT1260 Radiation Equipment/Exposure I (3 Credits)
This course provides the student with knowledge of basic radiation physics. Topics include units of measurement, general principles, and nature of radiography. Digital image processing, image storage and management are also discussed. Equipment quality control is demonstrated including lab tests to evaluate specific components. Prerequisites: RADT 1211, RADT 1231, RADT 1240, and RADT 1281. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

RADT1265 Imaging Technology II (1 Credits)
This course provides the student with the knowledge of equipment and technologies routinely used to produce diagnostic images. Various recording media and techniques as well as other imaging equipment are described. Specialized exams, the basics of venipuncture technique, and methods of quality improvement are covered. Equipment quality control is discussed including tests to evaluate specific components.

RADT1277 Radiography Pathology (1 Credits)
This course provides the student with an introduction to the concepts of disease and its effect on the human body. Pathology and disease, as they relate to various radiographic procedures, are discussed.

RADT1281 Clinical Radiography I (12 Credits)
This course is the first of three clinical education courses. The student is assigned to the clinical site for forty hours per week. Under the supervision of a clinical instructor, the student gains competency in radiography of the chest, abdomen, upper limb, shoulder girdle, and lower limb up to and including the knee. The student practices skills and demonstrates competency in radiographic processing, patient care, radiation protection, and general radiographic procedures and image critique. The student is introduced to radiography in trauma situations and the surgical setting. The student demonstrates professional interactions and work ethics in the clinical setting. The radiography program staff monitors progress and performance evaluations. Prerequisites: RADT 1211, RADT 1213, RADT 1231, RADT 1241, and RADT 1100. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (12 Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 12 clinical)

RADT2215 Film Evaluation (1 Credits)
This course provides students with the knowledge needed to evaluate radiographic examinations and to identify and recognize diagnostic quality. Images are evaluated for adequate technical preparation, proper use of equipment, careful radiography of the anatomical part, and the accept/reject analysis. Prerequisites: RADT 1211, RADT 1231, RADT 1241, and RADT 1281. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

RADT2219 Radiation Biology and Protection (2 Credits)
This course provides the student with an overview of the principles of the interaction of radiation with the human body as well as the principles of radiation protection. Radiation effects on biological molecules and organism, as well as factors affecting biological response, are explored. Discussion includes both acute and chronic effects of radiation. Radiation protection responsibilities of the radiographer for patients, personnel, and the public are presented. Prerequisites: RADT 1211, RADT 1213, RADT 1235, RADT 1241, RADT 1255, and RADT 2283. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

RADT2220 Radiation Biology and Protection (3 Credits)
This course provides the student with an overview of the principles of the interaction of radiation with the human body as well as the principles of radiation protection. Radiation effects on biological molecules and organism, as well as factors affecting biological response, are explored. Discussion includes both acute and chronic effects of radiation. Radiation protection responsibilities of the radiographer for patients, personnel, and the public are presented. Prerequisites: RADT 1211, RADT 1213, RADT 1235, RADT 1241, RADT 1255, and RADT 2283. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

RADT2239 Radiographic Procedures III (4 Credits)
This final procedures course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform radiographic examinations of the skull, facial bones, and paranasal sinuses. In addition, those systems needing oral or intravenous contrast agents, such as the digestive system and the urinary system, are covered, including not only the anatomy and positioning but also the examination protocols. Consideration of the needs of the geriatric patient is covered. Sectional anatomy of the head, thorax, and pelvis are introduced. Radiographs are evaluated for anatomy and positioning. There is a review of all anatomy and positioning previously studied, especially those areas identified by students as needing clarification. Prerequisites: RADT 1217, RADT 1219, RADT 1235, RADT 1255, RADT 2215, and RADT 2283. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)

RADT2260 Radiation Equipment/Exposure II (4 Credits)
This course focuses on image quality by considering factors that affect density, contrast, recorded detail, and distortion. X-ray interactions with matter are discussed. Complex mathematical problems that reflect the effect of change in exposure factors and radiographic devices on image quality will be calculated. Prerequisites: RADT 1240 and RADT 1260. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

RADT2261 Radiographic Equipment/Exposures II (3 Credits)
This course focuses on image quality by considering factors that affect density, contrast, recorded detail, and distortion. X-ray interactions with matter are discussed. Complex mathematical problems that reflect the effect of change in exposure factors and radiographic devices on image quality will be calculated. Prerequisites: RADT 1240 and RADT 1260. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

RADT2265 Modality Exploration (3 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the equipment, procedures, and technologies routinely used for specialized imaging procedures. Emphasis is placed on the complexity of this equipment. Various recording media and techniques, as well as specialized imaging equipment are described. Characteristic appearance of anatomical structures is presented for the various imaging modalities. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). Prerequisites: RADT 1211, RADT 1231, RADT 1240, and RADT 1281. (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)

RADT2283 Clinical Radiography II (11 Credits)
This course is the second of three clinical education courses. The students are assigned to the clinical site for 40 hours per week for a variety of shifts including evenings and weekends. Under the supervision of a clinical instructor, the student achieves performance competency in radiography of the femur, pelvic girdle, complete vertebral column, and bony thorax. Experience with pediatric and trauma patients is encouraged. The student continues to demonstrate competencies from Clinical I, as well as be evaluated for competency on any procedures still needed from that course. The student tabulates his or her radiographic repeat rate. Participation in surgical, bedside, and special procedures is monitored. The student improves skills in radiographic processing, patient care, radiation protection, and general radiographic procedures. The student demonstrates professional interactions and work ethics in the clinical setting. Prerequisites: RADT 1217, RADT 1219, RADT 1235, RADT 1255, and RADT 1281. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (11 Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 11 clinical)

RADT2286 Principles of Mammography (2 Credits)
This course includes two distinct components of mammography education: clinical mammography and the physics of mammography. Anatomy and physiology of the breast, clinical positioning of the breast and the physical principles of mammography machine operation and exposure technique are included. Additional content on quality assurance in mammography and the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) are presented. Prerequisites: BIOL 2021, RADT 1255, RADT 1235, and RADT 2283 or registered Radiologic Technologist. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

RADT2287 Clinical Radiography III (8 Credits)
This course is the final radiography clinical education course. The student demonstrates performance competency in radiographic examinations of the skull, facial bones, paranasal sinuses, upper and lower GI systems, gallbladder, and urinary system. Again, the student is scheduled 40 hours per week with varying rotations. The students maintain competencies from both prior clinical education courses and perform competency evaluations on any examination still needed from either course. Involvement in specialty areas is encouraged. The student demonstrates increased proficiency, accuracy, and speed in radiographic procedures. Critical thinking and problem solving are expected. The student demonstrates professional interactions and work ethics in the clinical setting. The radiography program staff monitors progress and performance evaluations. Prerequisites: RADT 2215, RADT 2219, RADT 2239, RADT 2245, RADT 2259, and RADT 2283. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (8 Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 8 clinical)

RADT2288 Clinical Mammography (1 Credits)
This course the student is assigned to a clinical site for 40 hours to perform mammographic examination. The student performs a minimum of 25 examinations under the direct supervision of an American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) registered technologist. The student demonstrates competency in performing mammographic examinations in compliance with the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) requirements. The student practices skills in patient preparation and education, quality control standards, and critiquing radiographic techniques. Successful completion results in the student obtaining certification for the 40 hours of training required by MQSA regulations. Prerequisites: RADT 2215, RADT 2219, RADT 2239, RADT 2245, RADT 2259, and RADT 2283. This course is part of the Radiography program which is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). (1 Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 1 clinical)

SBMT1150 Principles of Small Business Management and Planning (3 Credits)
Introduces the principles of business management concerning business entities, planning, and ethics. (3Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

SBMT1160 Small Business Record Keeping Applications I (3 Credits)
This course introduces the principles and systems of accounting in a small business. Accounting records and reports are a critical decision making tool in management, planning, and business operations. Prereq: None. (3Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

SBMT1170 Small Business Financial Management (3 Credits)
Principles of budgeting and break-even analysis as they apply to the financial management of the student's business. Prereq: None. (3Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

SBMT1180 Small Business Financing and Cash Management (3 Credits)
This course covers the principles of financing and cash management in the small business. The student will earn financial analysis procedures and funding in the on-going cash management of a business. Prereq: None. (3Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

SBMT1251 Developing the Business Plan (2 Credits)
This course covers the decision making, evaluation, importance and mechanics of writing a business plan. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1252 Principles of Small Business Management and Planning II (2 Credits)
This course uses the principles of business management to develop a small business strategic plan. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1261 Job Order Cost Accounting for Manufacturing Business I (2 Credits)
This course addresses the components of monitoring costs, job order cost cycle, purchasing materials, inventory, and payroll in job order cost accounting. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1262 Job Order Cost Accounting for Manufacturing Business II (2 Credits)
This course addresses the components of labor costs and rates, and the cost cycle in job order cost accounting. Prereq: SBMT1261. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1263 Cost Accounting in Manufacturing (2 Credits)
Principles and applications of process cost accounting, including components of goal setting, strategic planning, and business records. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect,0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1264 Cost Accounting Management in Small Business (2 Credits)
Principles and applications of cost accounting, including components of goal setting, strategic planning and business records. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1265 Small Business Record Keeping Applications II (2 Credits)
This course covers intermediate applications of general journal, general ledger, balance sheets, and income statements. Prereq: SBMT1160. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1266 Small Business Record Keeping Applications III (2 Credits)
This course covers accounts receivable, accounts payable, and inventory systems as they relate to accounts receivable and payable. Prereq: SBMT1160, SBMT1264. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1267 Payroll Systems for Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the implementation of a payroll system for small business. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1268 Governmental Payroll Reporting for Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the fundamentals, completion, and analysis of the federal and state employment tax forms and filing requirements. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1271 Introduction to Computers for Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the basics of microcomputer systems. The student will gain an overview of DOS, Word Processing, Database file management, and Spreadsheets. This will provide a good foundation for further computer training. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1272 Word Processing in Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers DOS and hard drive concepts. The emphasis is on concepts and commands that will enable the student to better understand and maintain their own microcomputer system. Prereq: None. (1Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 1 other)

SBMT1273 Window Operating Systems for Small Business (1 Credits)
This course covers Windows as an operating system. The emphasis is on concepts and commands that will enable the student to better understand and maintain their own microcomputer system. Prereq: None. (1Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 1 other)

SBMT1274 Word Processing for Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the use of spreadsheet software for business applications. The student will be able to create, edit, manipulate, and print document using selected software. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1275 Computerized Spreadsheets in Small Business (2 Credits)
Use of word processing software for business applications. The student will be able to create, edit, manipulate, and print document using selected software. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1276 Database Management for Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the use of data base management software for business applications. The student will be able to create, edit, manipulate, and print documents using selected software. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1279 Powerpoint Management for Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the use of Powerpoint management software for business applications. The student will be able to create, edit, manipulate, and utilize Powerpoint using selected software. 2cr

SBMT1281 Computerized Small Business General Ledger (2 Credits)
This course covers the process of computerizing business records using general ledger software. The student will be able to produce financial statements using the selected software package. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1282 Computerized Bank Reconciliation in Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the application of computerized bank account/general ledger reconciliation. The student will be able to prove bank account cash balances using the selected software package. Prereq: None. (1Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 1 other)

SBMT1283 Computerized Accounts Receivable in Small Business (2 Credits)
The process of computerizing business records using accounts receivable software. The student will be able to produce customer invoices, statements, and reports using the selected software package. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1284 Computerized Small Business General Ledger (2 Credits)
This course covers the process of computerizing business records using accounts payable software. The student will be able to track purchases, pay bills, manage cash flow, and print reports using the selected software. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1285 Computerized Payroll in Small Business (2 Credits)
The process of computerizing business records using payroll software. The student will be able to calculate payroll, print payroll checks, track tax liabilities, and print reports using the selected software package. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1286 Computerized Inventory Control in Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the various inventory methods that a company may use, FIFO, LIFO, Average Cost, or Standard Method and the procedures involved in maintaining those inventories. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1287 Computerized Sale Order Entry in Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the proper method for gathering and entering sales data. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1288 Computerized Asset Management in Small Business (2 Credits)
Asset valuation as it relates to actual and depreciated value. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1291 Computerized Payroll Year End Close in Small Business (1 Credits)
This course covers the process required to close the payroll system at the end of a calendar year. The student will be able to reconcile payroll records, print the required tax reports, and prepare the system for the next year using the selected software package. Prereq: None. (1Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 1 other)

SBMT1292 Computerized Accounting Year End Close in Small Business (1 Credits)
This course covers the process required to close the accounting system at the end of the fiscal year. The student will be able to close the accounting system at the end of the fiscal year. The student will be able to reconcile accounting records, post year end journal entries, and prepare the system for the new year using the selected software package. Prereq: None. (1Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 1 other)

SBMT1293 Computerized Small Business Financial Statement Analysis (2 Credits)
This course covers the generally accepted business ratios that apply to performance, when compared to generally accepted industry standards. The student will use company data that comes from accurate accrual financial statements. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1295 Computerized Small Business Peachtree Accounting for Windows (5 Credits)


SBMT1301 Business Math Principles (2 Credits)
This course teaches math skills as applied in business situations. The student will learn concept, application, and computation skills as they are used in business. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1303 Communication Techniques in Business (2 Credits)
Effective business communication techniques, including written, verbal, non-verbal, and technological communications. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT1305 Computer Applications in Small Business Management (2 Credits)
This course will discuss basic computer literacy, identify commonly used hardware and software, and demonstrate the uses of computers and software. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2150 Marketing in Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the fundamentals of advertising and marketing products and services in the small business. The student will prepare marketing and advertising plans that will include promotion, packaging, pricing, and placement strategies. Prereq: None. (3Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

SBMT2160 Small Business Cost Control I (3 Credits)
Purchasing and management of inventories, materials, supplies, services, and equipment of the right quality, in the proper quantity, for reasonable prices, at the appropriate time, from the right vendor or supplier. Prereq: None. (3Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

SBMT2170 Technology in the Small Business (3 Credits)
This course covers trends in business communications and electronic technology. The student will explore, identify, and implement business technology applications. Prereq: None. (3Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

SBMT2180 Human Resource Management in Small Business (3 Credits)
This course covers basic management functions of leadership, organizing, staffing, and motivating the small business work team. The student will identify organizational needs, create an organizational chart, develop employee policies, properly staff his/her business, and plan on-going programs for employee development. Prereq: None. (3Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 3 other)

SBMT2261 Credit Control and Security Management (2 Credits)
The development of credit and security policies and procedures. The student will examine the cost impact of credit and crime on small business. The student will create a credit policy and security manual. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2262 Government Regulation and Tax Compliance (2 Credits)
This course covers government regulations and tax compliance issues that affect the operation of a small business. The student will learn about tax law and government regulations that apply to their business and about the impact these laws and regulations have on the business. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2263 Small Business Cost Control II (2 Credits)
This course covers the fundamentals and strategies for effecting cost controls through appropriate pricing policies on products and/or services as well as exploration of the fundamentals of minimizing, controlling, and managing business risks. Prereq: SBMT2160. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2265 Small Business Record Keeping Applications V (2 Credits)
The analysis of, and procedures in, making adjusting entries for accounts receivable, general journal, and general ledgers. Prereq: SBMT1160, SBMT 1265, SBMT1266. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2266 Small Business Record Keeping Applications V (2 Credits)
This course covers monitoring of accounts receivable, accounts payable, and various inventory control systems. Prereq: SBMT 1160, SBMT1265, SBMT1266, SBMT2265. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2281 Labor Relations in Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the process of creating and managing a labor relations program in a small business. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 others)

SBMT2301 Personal & Occupational Wellness in Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the personal and occupational health, safety, and wellness issues to which students in business will be exposed. This course will concentrate on the analysis of personal habits as they relate to exposure to hazardous substances and the environment. Personal well-being will be addressed in terms of stress and fatigue and their impact on the individual as well as the family. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2303 Ethics in Business (2 Credits)
This course identifies and evaluates current issues relating to ethics in the small business environment. Students review employee/ employer rights and general ethical practices. Students will develop a code of ethics for their business. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2305 Business Law and Government Regulations (2 Credits)
This course covers the fundamental legal and government regulation issues facing small business owners. The student will learn basic legal information and learn to identify government regulatory agencies and issues that affect their business. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2307 Family and Business Relationships in Small Business (2 Credits)
This course explores the unique relationship challenges presented during the operation of a family owned business. It also deals with issues related to multiple family businesses as well as multigenerational businesses. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2309 Relationship Strategies in Small Business (2 Credits)
This course covers the concept of understanding and identifying behavioral styles. Relationship strategies is a practical approach to apply behavioral research and science in day-to-day living to reduce tension and increase cooperation and compatibility among people. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SBMT2311 International Markets for Small Business (2 Credits)
This course explains the opportunities for small business in the international marketplace. The student will evaluate their business potential in the global market. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SFBM1101 Application of Production Enterprise Information (2 Credits)
This course describes procedures for applying swine finishing information provided by computerized analysis of either wean to finish or feeder pig to finish operations. Prereq: None. (2Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 2 other)

SFBM1102 Introduction to Production & Financial Standards (4 Credits)
This course designed to expand the thinking of pork producers to put them on the same playing field as other swine businesses. This course is the doorway for producers to access the best tools available to protect themselves against unreasonable risk and reduce business "variables" as much as possible when making business decisions. Prereq: None. (4Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 4 other)

SFBM1103 Environmental Analysis & Interaction (4 Credits)
This course will examine the swine producers system from an environmental side. The student will be able to access their buildings from the pig's optimal environment viewpoint as well as the managers who handle the pigs. Also, evaluation of expansion plans and/or developing pig flows or through-puts analysis. Prereq: None. (4Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 4 other)

SFBM1104 Managing a Heard Health Plan (4 Credits)
This course describes various aspects of a herd health plan for a swine operation. Prereq: None. (4Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 4 other)

SFBM1105 Pork Marketing (4 Credits)
This course covers the five P's of marketing: Product, Place, Price, Promotion and Positioning. Prereq: None. (4Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 4 other)

SIMM1000 Healthcare Simulation Theory, Philosophy, and Educational Concepts (3 Credits)
This course introduces the core theoretical and philosophical concepts of simulation-based healthcare education. Various theories and philosophies from the world of simulation are introduced, explored, applied, and evaluated. Core concepts such as simulation history, terminology, pedagogy, and evidence-based practice are learned. Students explore the framework of simulation as it applies to educational concepts, utilizing adult learning principles, active learning approaches, and basic concepts of objective and outcome creation, planning, and implementation, and evaluation. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SIMM1020 Simulation Operations (2 Credits)
This course introduces students to the personnel roles, the simulation lab learning environment, and common equipment used in the functioning of the lab. The functions for various roles as related to the simulation environment and simulation learning modality will be explored. Students learn basic concepts related to managing staff and schedules, inventory and stocking, equipment use and maintenance, and creation and implementation of policies and procedures. The opportunities and challenges of various simulation lab designs are explored. Students learn video recording and media management techniques, use of mannequin and task trainer hardware and software, and receive an orientation to basic medical-related equipment. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SIMM1040 Simulation Design I  (2 Credits)
This course assists the learner to focus on the specifics of creating a scenario needed in the implementation of a live clinical simulation. The learner will utilize foundational approaches to case study design, algorithm creation, scripting, and the use of scenario planning worksheet templates. The learner will understand how to incorporate skill-based and/or comprehensive-based objectives which will assist in the development of critical thinking and competency. Prerequisites: SIMM 1000 and SIMM 1020. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SIMM1041 Simulation Design II (2 Credits)
This course carries forward the skills learned from Simulation Design I and coordinates with the skills needed to implement a live clinical simulation. The learner will understand the different types of simulation fidelity and simulators and determines which will work best to meet the simulation outcomes. The learner will understand the concepts of realism needed to assist participants to engage into the simulation. The learner will compare and contrast the benefits and challenges of simulation with a human simulator and/or a standardized patient. Students will learn how to stage the simulation with the use of moulage, props, and equipment. Prerequisite: SIMM 1040. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SIMM1060 Simulation Implementation-Healthcare (2 Credits)
This course introduces the learner to various avenues to consider in the beginning phases of developing a simulation program such as cost analysis, business plans, and grants. The learner will incorporate the equipment and technical needs identified in SIMM 1020 - Simulation Operation and analyze the startup cost of a simulation lab. The learner will understand the need to build in a financial infrastructure and to explore what grants are available. The learner will understand the need for staff development and training and the costs involved when establishing simulation into a healthcare environment. Prerequisite: SIMM 1041. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SIMM2000 Simulation Debriefing (3 Credits)
This course introduces the power of reflective, cooperative, process-based discussion as a learning method. Learners will explore various debriefing philosophies. They will learn how to facilitate dialog, connect diverse perspectives and identify potential debriefing pitfalls. Learners will discover and apply the concepts of non-judgmental debriefings. Scenarios varying in context complexity and intensity will be used to practice debriefing skills. Learners will explore how to incorporate the use of observers and/or video recording to improve the debriefing process. Prerequisite: SIMM 1041. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SIMM2020 Simulation Evaluation (3 Credits)
This course explores the concepts of formative and summative evaluation in simulation-based education. The student will learn to apply different evident-based research evaluation methodologies. The learner will apply and evaluate various teaching and learning strategies used in simulation. The learner will explore the challenges and benefits to various approaches when evaluating simulations. The learner will also develop a systematic evaluation plan for a simulation based learning experience. Prerequisite: SIMM 2000. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SIMM2040 Simulation Internship-Healthcare (4 Credits)
Each student performs a total of 165 hours of observation and direct service at the field site and participates in progress meetings to process experiences in a Healthcare Simulation Center, Hospital or Clinic. The purpose of the internship is for students to synthesize the knowledge from all prior simulation coursework to demonstrate their knowledge and expertise in creating and implementing simulation experiences in an applied setting. Prerequisites: SIMM 1060 and SIMM 2000. (4 Cr - 0 lect, 0 lab, 4 other)

SMGT1000 Principles of Supervisory Leadership (3 Credits)
This course is designed to assist the student to increase potential in using effective supervisory skills. Skills needed to lead in today's workplace such as creating positive environments, understanding a manager's role in the workplace, planning and problem solving, as well as fundamental skills in human resources are covered and introduces students to skill development in staffing, training, and motivating. Leadership awareness is an integral part of effective supervision. Leadership skills and strategies are covered. Mandatory supervisory skills such as controlling, quality assurance, and improvement strategies are studied. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1010 Interpersonal Skills At Work (1 Credits)
This course builds the workplace skills required to generate enthusiasm, enlist cooperation, and bring out the best in others. This course provides understanding and practice in effective verbal communication and intends to enhance the supervisory skills of giving feedback and responding to emotional behavior. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1015 Emotional Intelligence (1 Credits)
This course introduces the students to techniques to improve their relationships with others through understanding and developing their emotional intelligence. Course content will help students gain an understanding of the research that shows emotional intelligence plays a critical role in increasing productivity, performance, and satisfaction both in and outside the workplace. Emotional intelligence can be significantly improved throughout one’s life and is an important part of life-long learning. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab) no pre-reqs

SMGT1020 Leadership Development (2 Credits)
This course introduces students to different leadership traits and styles. Students analyze many types of leaders, both traditional and contemporary. Students participate in an in-depth analysis of personal leadership styles including identifying their strengths and weaknesses. Emphasis is placed on developing individual leadership styles and on learning techniques to foster growth in others' leadership capabilities as well as applying leadership skills on the job and soliciting feedback. Strategic planning processes and the application of leadership skills to strategic planning are covered. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1025 Community Leadership (3 Credits)
This course introduces students to a variety of both personal and community leadership traits, styles, challenges and issues within the community they live and work. This course is designed to enable students to learn about community resources, values, strengths, weaknesses, and challenges. A learning experience geared toward providing an intense look at the business community, politics, education, quality of life, health care, human services, law, media, diversity, and/or other topics inherent in the community will be provided. Opportunities are provided for students to exchange ideas, build networks and begin the process of identifying and solving important community issues. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1030 Work Ethics (1 Credits)
This course focuses on the influence of ethics and values on supervisory skills and decision-making. The relationship between ethics and values is studied. The Resolved Strategy of Ethical Decision Making is used to identify ethical dilemmas, analyze those dilemmas, and choose and defend ethical decisions in response. This course identifies supervisory strategies to motivate employees and define the role ethics and values play in the outcome of those strategies. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1040 Managing Change (1 Credits)
This course provides practical applications for creating appropriate change in any organization. Participants develop an awareness of the major sources and benefits of change. Changing social, political, legal, technological, and managerial environments is initiated by leaders effectively managing change. The course provides supervisors to facilitate change, understand the issues, prepare for change, and help employees with change. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of the course content. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab,)

SMGT1050 Conflict Resolution (1 Credits)
This course presents concepts applied to conflict resolution and negotiation. The ability to resolve conflict is an essential skill for supervisory or management personnel and promotes success within organizations and enhances upward mobility in career paths. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1060 Strategies for Personal Effectiveness (1 Credits)
This course focuses on personal excellence through positive attitudes and self empowerment. This course offers techniques and strategies to stay positive and focused in a busy, pressure-filled world. Through a process of personal exploration and growth, students discover insights about behavior and thought processes. Self-improvement strategies offer students an opportunity to gain new perspectives on their personal life and career. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1070 Building Collaborative Relationships (1 Credits)
This course will help students gain an understanding of why some of our working relationships are highly productive, others frustrating and ineffectual and also show the student what is required by individuals to build more successful and collaborative relationships - internally in teams, across functions and departments, or externally with suppliers, customers and partners. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1080 Strategic Planning, Goal Setting, and Succession Planning (1 Credits)
This course introduces students to the components of a strategic plan and the process of strategic planning. You will learn how setting goals and managing teams is a critical part of actually getting plans implemented. Students will gain an understanding of succession planning and how it ties into a strategic plan. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1090 Leading Through Vision, Mission, and Values Statements (1 Credits)
This course introduces the opportunity to experience first-hand the power that a mission, vision, and value statements can have for leading teams, departments, and organizations. Students will look at several ways you can use mission, vision, and value statements to generate tactical plans that bring these statements to life in your organization. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1095 Supervisory Management – Leadership – Internship (1 Credits)
This course is designed to assist the student in experiencing the real-world environment that a leader is exposed to everyday in the workforce. Students will work alongside a professional for a total of 48 hours. Internship worksite must be pre-approved by the program manager or SMGT faculty. (1 Cr – 0 lect, 0 lab, 1 OTJ)

SMGT1200 Quality & Productivity Improvement (2 Credits)
This course is designed for individuals and organizations interested in improving the quality of products and services, as well as productivity and profitability. An overview of quality fundamentals and productivity with explanations of key quality improvement tools and techniques are covered. Participants undertake a critical examination of personal and organizational management practices through the development of a quality improvement project. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1210 Problem Solving/Decision Making (2 Credits)
This course emphasizes the skills and resources required to solve organizational problems, make better decisions, and achieve professional and organizational goals. There is an opportunity to practice various problem solving techniques on real problems in the workplace, as well as creative and critical thinking methods. Focus is on improvement of problem solving skills on the job through practical application. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1220 Work Teams (1 Credits)
This course focuses on building and maintaining synergism in the relationships among project teams and/or self-managing work teams. Participants are introduced to concepts that turn groups into highly productive teams and heighten performance. A secondary emphasis is on the emerging importance and use of self-managing work teams in organizations. The focus of the course is to identify the organizational needs for self-managing teams and the change needed to implement them. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1230 Planning & Project Management (1 Credits)
This course focuses on tools for managing and controlling projects with definite beginning and ending points. Emphasis is on managing projects with many complex activities and dimensions, and/or many simultaneous activities. Students learn to construct and use several project planning and control tools such as Critical Path Method (CPM), Activity Flow Network, Slack Time calculation and Gantt charts. Student plan a relevant personal work project using these tools. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Solar Photovoltaic (NABCEP). (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1240 Meeting Management (1 Credits)
This course provides an opportunity to practice effective organizing, planning and communication skills that result in effective meetings. Assisting employees to understand what to expect before, during and after meetings are also be covered. This course focuses on developing skills and increasing knowledge to enhance productivity in meetings. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1250 Managing Customer Service (1 Credits)
This course focuses on the study of businesses relevant to increasing profitability through assessing customer needs, changing expectations, and supervising and motivating employees to service excellence. Tools of measurement in customer service for both internal and external customers are also covered as well as critical elements of serving customers in both private businesses and public agencies. Understanding customer-driven service quality and how to apply the concept in the workplace are included. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab,)

SMGT1260 Time Management (1 Credits)
This course focuses on identifying time management principles. Students think, plan, prioritize, concentrate energies, achieve goals, and bring work and personal life into balance and harmony. Identifying personal time wasters and developing your own time management plan are included. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1270 Creativity & Innovation (1 Credits)
This course is designed to inspire innate creativity to help launch major projects or untangle difficult situations. It focuses on providing fresh insight and new perspective on even the most routine elements of any job and to view problem solving as a creative opportunity. The use of creativity to provide a competitive edge leading to needed change and increased productivity is covered as well as techniques that help with idea generation and innovative solutions to problems. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1280 Lead Auditory Training with AS9100 Aerospace Auditor Certification (5 Credits)
This course is designed to prepare and examine candidates to meet all requirements to achieve qualification as a RAB Certified Aerospace Auditor. Lead Auditor Training for the RAB Certified Aerospace Auditor is focused on the learning, development and assessment of the auditor candidates. Advisement, correction, discussion, interaction, information transfer and application of skills are the focus of the training session.(5 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab, 2 OJT) Prerequisite: None

SMGT1281 RABQSA-Certified ISO9001:2000 Lead Auditor Training with AIAG ISO/TS 16949: (3 Credits)
This 5-day course provides a practical understanding of ISO/TS 16949:2002 by focusing on the automotive process approach, changes to the Technical Specification, and how both impact auditing practices. Included is detailed instruction on key/core processes, a review of the automotive process-approach auditing methodology utilized in the Certification Body auditor training, and a simulated audit to refine your newly acquired auditing knowledge and skills. In addition, students will link the Technical Specification to the Core Tools Reference Manuals: FMEA, PPAP, MSA and SPC. APQP is now integrated into the Technical Specification as part of product realization. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab) Prerequisite: None

SMGT1282 Lead Auditor-Aerospace (w/o OJT) (3 Credits)
This course is designed to prepare and examine candidates to meet classroom requirements pursuant to qualification as a RABQSA Certified Aerospace Auditor. Lead Auditor Training for the RABQSA Certified Aerospace Auditor is focused on the learning, development and assessment of the auditor candidates. Advisement, correction, discussion, interaction, information transfer and application of skills are the focus of the training session. Trainer evaluations of the auditor candidates' performance and understanding are directed toward improving candidates' performance and understanding, as well as determining the candidates' certification status. Final evaluations of the candidates are determined by a candidate's performance on the written exam and the composite of performance evaluations during the certification session. This course differs from the 5-credit SMGT 1280 in that this course does not include the OJT audit segment. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab) Prerequisite: None

SMGT1283 Associate Auditor (2 Credits)
This 3-day course provides a practical understanding of ISO/TS 16949:2002 by focusing on the automotive process approach, changes to the Technical Specification, and how both impact auditing practices. Included is detailed instruction on key/core processes, sub-processes, and management processes, a review of the automotive process-approach auditing methodology utilized in the Certification Body auditor training, and a simulated audit to refine your newly acquired auditing knowledge and skills. Students will leave with the skills and knowledge to conduct an internal audit or a process-based system. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab) Prerequisite: None

SMGT1295 Supervisory Management – Supervising and Managing – Internship (1 Credits)
This course assists the student in experiencing the real-world environment that a supervisor is exposed to everyday in the workforce. Students will work alongside a professional for a total of 48 hours. Internship worksite must be pre-approved by the program manager or SMGT faculty. (1 Cr – 1 lect, 0 lab, 1 OTJ)

SMGT1400 Performance Management (1 Credits)
This course focuses on performance management for the process of identifying, developing, and using an organization's human resources. This course includes competency models, performance plans, goal setting, performance appraisals, recognition and coaching. It provides a supervisory approach for performance appraisals based on preparation and technique. Practical applications of procedures are conducted through skill practices. Hands-on projects and cases provide practice in employee performance evaluation. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1410 Coaching (1 Credits)
This course provides students with skills necessary to coach, mentor, tutor, counsel, and confront performance issues in order to help employees become more committed to performance objectives and increase productivity. The students practice setting, communicating, and coaching employees to performance expectations. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1420 Managing A Diverse Workforce (1 Credits)
This course emphasizes diversity in culture, race, sex, age, and ability as some of the chief characteristics of the workplace of the future. This course prepares managers to utilize diversity for greater effectiveness as well as employer and employee satisfaction. Assisting management to eliminate existing barriers affecting equal access, professional growth, and mobility which enables every employee to reach his or her potential in today's diversified workforce is included. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1430 Employment Law (1 Credits)
This course emphasizes the legal aspects of workplace supervision. The focus is on the legal requirements of today's workplace including executing supervisory responsibilities, avoiding legal infractions and violations, and following employer policies and procedures. Other types of legal issues that may arise in the workplace are also included. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1440 Employee Selection (1 Credits)
This course emphasizes supervisory skills in conducting effective interviews for and selecting the best candidates. Issues such as legal requirements for hiring practices, objectivity, and fairness are examined. Practical applications of techniques are featured. Course focus is on improving interviewing skills. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1450 Employee Training (2 Credits)
This course emphasizes personnel training and development functions in organizations as well as advancement of competence in the areas of analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation, and training. It provides the opportunity to examine training and development leadership, examine training and development needs, and identify opportunities to achieve greater productivity. Students sharpen skills in communicating job expectations, orienting new employees and providing an OJT (on the job training) demonstration. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1460 Stress Management/Wellness (1 Credits)
This course assists supervisors to gain a better understanding of stress and its causes. Participants identify the most common stress warning signs and recognize which types of people are most susceptible to stress. In addition to practicing techniques for controlling stress, there is an opportunity to calculate a stress inventory and develop a stress-relief plan for yourself and a wellness plan for your organization. This course focuses on reducing and channeling stress towards a goal of creating healthier, happier, and more productive workers. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1470 Safety & Compliance Management (1 Credits)
This course emphasizes supervisor responsibilities for safety training, compliance, industrial hygiene, motivation, enforcement, and compliance. It focuses on safety problems, risk management, and accident prevention in the work environment. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1480 Employee Assistance Issues (1 Credits)
This course emphasizes skills to handle suspected substance abuse problem effectively, fairly, and legally. Focus is on understanding drug and alcohol abuse, AIDS in the workplace, family relationships, and clinical depression. This course also covers employee assistance programs and the latest research on treatment and recovery of the conditions and diseases studied. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1495 Supervisory Management – Human Resource Development – Internship (1 Credits)
This course assists the student in experiencing the real-world environment that a human resources team member is exposed to everyday in the workforce. Students will work alongside a professional for a total of 48 hours. Internship worksite must be pre-approved by the program manager or SMGT faculty. (1 Cr – 1 lect, 0 lab, 1 OTJ)

SMGT1500 Lead Auditor-Automotive (3 Credits)
This 5-day course provides a practical understanding of ISO/TS 16949:2002 by focusing on the automotive process approach, changes to the Technical Specification, and how both impact auditing practices. Included is detailed instruction on key/core processes, a review of the automotive process-approach auditing methodology utilized in the Certification Body auditor training, and a simulated audit to refine your newly acquired auditing knowledge and skills. In addition, students will link the Technical Specification to the Core Tools Reference Manuals: FMEA, PPAP, MSA and SPC. APQP is now integrated into the Technical Specification as part of product realization. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab) Prerequisite: None

SMGT1505 Associate Auditor (2 Credits)
This 3-day course provides a practical understanding of ISO/TS 16949:2002 by focusing on the automotive process approach, changes to the Technical Specification, and how both impact auditing practices. Included is detailed instruction on key/core processes, sub-processes, and management processes, a review of the automotive process-approach auditing methodology utilized in the Certification Body auditor training, and a simulated audit to refine your newly acquired auditing knowledge and skills. Students will leave with the skills and knowledge to conduct an internal audit or a process-based system. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab) Prerequisite: None

SMGT1510 ISO/TS (Technical Specification) (1 Credits)
This course examines the requirements to gain an understanding of ISO/TS 16949:2002 while also providing a solid understanding of the background and intent that should affect how the Technical Specification is implemented. The focus of this course is the role of the automotive process approach and how the approach applies to specific implementation issues that arise during the training. This course is not recommended or intended for QS- 9000 transitions to ISO/TS 16949. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1515 APQP (Advanced Product Quality Planning) (1 Credits)
This course focuses on the skills needed to implement the Advanced Product Quality Planning (APQP) process, develop Control Plans, and complete the Pre Production Approval Process (PPAP) within organizations. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1520 Implementing FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis) (0 Credits)
This course offers students the skills to understand and use FMEAs and the concept of risk reduction and defect preventions. This course introduces these concepts by identification of failures followed by activities designed to reduce risk. Knowledge of automotive requirements recommended. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1525 MSA (Measurement System Analysis) (0 Credits)
This course emphasizes on the Measurement System Analysis (MSA) Reference Manual and its impact on quality systems. Also included are organizational applications, categories of measurement system variation, and Gage Repeatability and Reproducibility. MSA has direct application to QS-9000, ISO/TS 16949:2002, and the TE Supplement. Knowledge of automotive requirements recommended. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1530 SPC (Statistical Process Control) (0 Credits)
This course provides a practical understanding of key Statistical Process Control (SPC) methodologies within QS-9000, ISO/TS 16949:2002, or the TE Supplement. The class focuses on identifying the need for SPC tools within QS-900, ISO/TS 16949:2002, or TE required activities. The course includes selecting the appropriate tool for an identified purpose, recognizing a more complex methodology, applying the selected tool, interpreting the results of the application, and making correct decisions based on the interpretation. Knowledge of automotive requirements recommended. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1535 Auditing Core Tools (2 Credits)
This course is intended to provide understanding of and practical application experience with the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025. This course focuses on the personnel roles of internal test laboratories, internal calibration laboratories, external test laboratories and external calibration laboratories. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1540 Understanding ISO/IEC 17025 (1 Credits)
This course is intended to provide understanding of and practical application experience with the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025. This course focuses on the personnel roles of internal test laboratories, internal calibration laboratories, external test laboratories and external calibration laboratories. (1 Cr 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1545 Understanding ISO 14001 (1 Credits)
This course covers the concepts of ISO 14001:2004 Environmental Management System (EMS) and how the standard becomes a valuable part of business management systems. The course focuses on addressing key issues in environmental management, the benefits of an environmental management system, and the ISO 14000 series. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1550 Auditing 17025 (0 Credits)
This course provides a foundational understanding of auditing compliance to the ISO/IEC 17025 Standard. The course includes a simulated audit of internal test and calibration laboratories. Prerequisite: SMGT 1540. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1555 Auditing ISO 14001 (0 Credits)
This course introduces the skills needed to conduct successful internal environmental management system audits for an ISO 14001:2004 Environmental Management System (EMS). A fully-simulated audit is included. (.5 Cr - .5 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1570 How To Transition to ISO/TS 16949:2002 (2 Credits)
This course provides students with a basic understanding of ISO/TS 16949:2002. Background on ISO/TS 16949:2002's background, intent, and requirements are included. The course includes key process identification, sup-process identification, management process identification, sequence, interaction, and measurement. Not recommended or intended for ISO 9001/9002 transitions to ISO/TS 16949:2002. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1575 Applied MSA/SPC for Practitioners (2 Credits)
This course identifies the need for Statistical Process Control (SPC) and Measurement System Analysis (MSA) tools within organizations, select appropriate tools for an identified purpose, explain application of the selected tools, interpret the results of the application, and make logical business recommendations and decisions based on the interpretation. Basic statistical calculations are made for each topic. Students should have a fundamental knowledge of mathematics at the level of first year algebra, basic calculator skills, and an understanding of the need for SPC and MSA studies in the management of successful organizations. An understanding of automotive requirements is recommended. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1580 Supplier Auditor Certification (AIAG ISO/TS 16949:2002) (2 Credits)
This 4-day course provides a practical understanding of ISO/TS 16949:2002 by focusing on the automotive process approach, changes to the Technical Specification, and how both impact auditing practices. Included is detailed instruction on key/core processes, a review of the automotive process-approach auditing methodology utilized in the Certification Body auditor training, and a simulated audit to refine newly acquired auditing knowledge and skills. In addition, students will link the Technical Specification to the North American Automotive Core Tools Reference Manuals (APQP/PPAP, FMEA, MSA and SPC) and North American Customer Requirements (Ford, GM and DaimlerChrysler). There is a written examination consisting of two parts. Part 1 is a written examination consisting of multiple choice questions that test the student's knowledge (the Knowledge Examination). Part 2 is a written examination requiring essay responses that test the student's skill (the Application Examination). Students must successfully complete both Part 1 and Part 2 of the written examination to successfully achieve AIAG ISO/TS 16949:2002 Supplier Auditor Certification. Prerequisite: None (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1600 Leadership 2000 Service (3 Credits)
This course is designed for individuals needing skills required in organizations that are fostering a collaborative environment where decision making is shared by employees and managers and where every person needs to take initiative. The course provides a foundation of one-on-one interpersonal skills, plus the enhanced skills that support team initiatives, quality improvement and process improvement efforts. Prereq: None. (3Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1610 Changing Workplace Skills (1 Credits)
This course is designed for individuals needing skills required in organizations that are experiencing change whereby time management and positive, supportive employees are encouraged and expected. Topics include: Personal Strategies for Navigating Change, Managing Your Priorities, Coaching: Bringing out the Best in Others and Moving from Conflict to Collaboration. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1620 Collaborations Skills (1 Credits)
This course is designed for individuals needing skills required in organizations that are fostering a collaborative environment where communication skills are necessary. This course strengthens interpersonal skills. Topics include: Building a Foundation of Trust, Expressing Yourself: Presenting Your Thoughts & Ideas, Giving & Receiving Constructive Feedback and Handling Emotions Under Pressure. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1630 Team Initiatives (1 Credits)
This course is designed for individuals needing skills required in organizations that are fostering team and participative work environments. Topics include: The Leader in Each of Us, Influencing for Win-Win Outcomes, Proactive Listening and Giving Recognition. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT1700 Lead Auditor-Aerospace (5 Credits)
This course is designed to prepare and examine candidates to meet all requirements to achieve qualification as a RAB Certified Aerospace Auditor. Lead Auditor Training for the RAB Certified Aerospace Auditor is focused on the learning, development and assessment of the auditor candidates. Advisement, correction, discussion, interaction, information transfer, and application of skills are the focus of the training session. Trainer evaluations of the auditor candidates' performance and understanding are directed toward improving the candidates' performance and understanding, as well as, determining the candidates' certification status. Trainers are required to make final pas/fail determinations by the end of the training session; however, during initial phases of the training, their focus is to correct, not grade. The collection of performance data in total (including corrected performance) will be used to assist the trainers to make pass/fail determinations with regard to candidates' performance and understanding. As a result, final evaluations of the candidates are determined by a candidate's performance on the written exam and the composite of continuous performance evaluations during the certification session. Prerequisite: None (5 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab, 2 OJT)

SMGT1705 Lead Auditor-Aerospace (w/o OJT) (3 Credits)
This course is designed to prepare and examine candidates to meet classroom requirements pursuant to qualification as a RABQSA Certified Aerospace Auditor. Lead Auditor Training for the RABQSA Certified Aerospace Auditor is focused on the learning, development and assessment of the auditor candidates. Advisement, correction, discussion, interaction, information transfer and application of skills are the focus of the training session. Trainer evaluations of the auditor candidates' performance and understanding are directed toward improving candidates' performance and understanding, as well as determining the candidates' certification status. Final evaluations of the candidates are determined by a candidate's performance on the written exam and the composite of performance evaluations during the certification session. This course differs from the 5-credit SMGT 1700 in that this course does not include the OJT audit segment. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab) Prerequisite: None

SMGT2000 Accounting for Non-Financial Managers (2 Credits)
This course provides students with a basic understanding of accounting for non-financial managers with emphasis on interpretation of financial statements and accounting data. The course develops an understanding of basic accounting principles and concepts, applies various analytical methods to many types of financial information, and familiarizes students with financial statements and records to make proper decisions. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT2010 Statistical Process Control (1 Credits)
This course forms the foundation for score keeping and breakthrough improvements in product and service quality. It builds competence in suing Statistical Process Control (SPC) concepts and integrating them with basic tools needed to identify and eliminate special cause in quality problems. Students apply skills to work situations and demonstrate application to show improvement. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT2020 Managing Problem Performance (1 Credits)
This course provides participants with a procedure to deal with individual work performance problems. It presents techniques for addressing poor performance and progressive discipline. Prereq: None (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT2030 Women's Issues in Supervision (1 Credits)
This course identifies work place barriers related to performance, opportunities and advancement for women in supervision. Prereq: None. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT2040 Ergonomics the Supervisor Role (1 Credits)
This course reduces the risk of injuries due to poor ergonomics and identifies potential problems to improve the working environment. The course covers the definition of ergonomics, the types of injuries resulting from poor ergonomics along with common injury symptoms, and the risk factors and methods for improving the ergonomics in the working environment. Conducting assessments of your work environment with the goal of identifying potential issues and recommending improvements are included. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT2050 Technical Writing (1 Credits)
Technical Writing covers both internal and external reports used in business and industry including instructions, interoffice communications and technical reports. Students are exposed to formats, visual and documentation methods used in technical report writing. Students study writing as a process while writing technical reports. Prereq: None (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SMGT2060 Labor Relations (1 Credits)
This course will provide participants with a practical understanding of how to manage an effective labor relations program. General topics include: the historic and legal context for modern labor relations; collective bargaining; contract administration; employee discipline; dispute resolution; and effective supervisory practice. Prereq: None. (1Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SOCI1101 Introduction to Sociology (3 Credits)
This course is a survey of the sociological concepts, theories and ideas that have been developed through the scientific study of human interaction. The emphasis of the course is the description and analysis of the nature and characteristics of societies, the structure and processes of social life, the influence of social forces on individuals and groups with an emphasis on cultural diversity and globalism. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SOCI1103 Social Problems (3 Credits)
This course focuses on the nature, dimensions, causes, and characteristics of selected social problems in modern society. The sociological perspective and critical thinking will be emphasized in examining theories, research, and programs for the prevention and reduction of social problems. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SOCI2103 Marriage and Family (3 Credits)
This course focuses on the social processes and social structures of courtship, marriage, and family. The relationships between society, cultures, family systems, families and individuals will also be examined. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SOCI2111 Topics in Sociology (1 Credits)
This course is designed to focus on a current issue in society using the sociological perspective. The topic will vary and may include topics such as the sociology of law, medicine, politics, revolution, terrorism, paranormal beliefs, and economics. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SOCI2112 Topics in Sociology (2 Credits)
This course is designed to focus on a current issue in society using the sociological perspective. The topic will vary and may include topics such as the sociology of law, medicine, politics, revolution, terrorism, paranormal beliefs, and economics. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SOCI2113 Topics in Sociology (3 Credits)
This course is designed to focus on a current issue in society, using the sociological perspective. The topic will vary and may include topics such as the sociology of law, medicine, politics, revolution, and terrorism, paranormal beliefs, and economics. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SOCI2125 Cultural Diversity (3 Credits)
This course examines the historical framework and the social interactions of racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Gender, sexual orientation, religion and other characteristics that contribute to a culturally diverse society are also described and analyzed in this course. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SOCI2130 Criminology (3 Credits)
This course is the study of the theories and research examining juvenile and adult criminal behavior historically and in contemporary society. The content of the course includes the analyses of crime causation, the extent, nature, philosophies, consequences, and practices involved in dealing with crime and delinquency as it relates not only to the individual, but also to society as a whole. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SOCI2150 Sexuality and Relationships (3 Credits)
This course focuses on sexuality and interpersonal relationships. The following topics will be emphasized: healthy sexual attitudes, communicating about sexuality and relationships, decision making, responsibility, values, gender roles, sexual abuse, dealing with changing expectations in relationships and society, differentiating healthy from unhealthy relationships, and forms of intimacy. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1001 Beginning Spanish I (4 Credits)
This course is designed for the beginning-level student with no previous knowledge of Spanish. Course content focuses on developing speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language and Culture (ACTFL) standards. Emphasis is placed on learning useful vocabulary for a variety of everyday situations. Cultural topics will be presented to develop cultural awareness. MnTC (Goal 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1002 Beginning Spanish II (4 Credits)
This course is designed for students who have completed SPAN 1001 or approximately one year of high school Spanish. Course content focuses on developing speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language and Culture (ACTFL) standards. Emphasis is placed on learning useful vocabulary for a variety of everyday situations. Cultural topics will be presented to develop cultural awareness. MnTC (Goal 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1100 Spanish For Law Enforcement I (2 Credits)
This beginning-level course is designed for law enforcement personnel who are likely to find themselves in situations necessitating the capability to speak Spanish. Coursework will involve an introduction to and practice with vocabulary specific to real-life situations in the law enforcement profession. Emphasis will be placed on active participation and role-playing. Previous knowledge of the Spanish language is helpful but not required. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1200 Spanish for Law Enforcement II (2 Credits)
This course is a continuation of SPAN 1100 and will reinforce material covered in that course. It will also expand vocabulary to include what would be useful and necessary in dealing with many more real-life situations in the law enforcement profession using the Spanish language. Emphasis will be placed on active participation and role-playing. Prerequisites include one of the following: SPAN 1100, SPAN 1001, one year of high school Spanish, or the equivalent. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1300 Spanish for Emergency Medical Services and Firefighters (2 Credits)
This beginning-level course is designed for Emergency Medical Service (EMS) providers and firefighters who need to speak Spanish in order to perform their required duties more effectively. Coursework will involve an introduction to and practice with vocabulary, phrases, and questions specific to real-life situations for those professions. Emphasis will be placed on active participation and role-playing. Previous knowledge of Spanish is helpful but not required. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1400 Spanish for Emergency Medical Services II (2 Credits)
This course is a continuation of SPAN 1300 and will expand upon the vocabulary and situations included in the beginning course. Continued practice and additional vocabulary will expand the range of situations in which Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers will be able to function effectively when Spanish speakers are involved. Coursework will involve an introduction to and practice with vocabulary, phrases, and questions specific to real-life situations for EMS personnel. Emphasis will be placed on active participation and role-playing. Prerequisite: SPAN 1300. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1500 Spanish for Healthcare Employees I (2 Credits)
This beginning level course is designed for healthcare workers who need to learn Spanish for use in healthcare situations. Coursework will involve an introduction to and practice with vocabulary, communicative phrases, and questions specific to healthcare situations. Emphasis will be placed on active participation and role playing. Previous knowledge of the Spanish language and culture is helpful, but not required. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1600 Spanish for Healthcare Employees II (2 Credits)
This course is a continuation of SPAN 1500 and will review and reinforce content covered in that course. It will also include additional vocabulary that is useful and necessary in everyday healthcare situations. Emphasis will be placed on active participation and role playing. Prerequisites: SPAN 1500 or instructor approval. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1700 Spanish for Business Office Employees (2 Credits)
This beginning level course is designed for business office employees who need to learn Spanish for use in daily activities and functions of their work. Coursework will involve an introduction and practice with vocabulary, communicative phrases and questions specific to business situations. Emphasis will be placed on active participation and role playing. Reading and writing of business forms and transactions will also be practiced. Previous knowledge of the Spanish language and culture is helpful, but not required. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1705 Business Office Employees I (1 Credits)
This introductory course is designed for business office employees who need to learn Spanish for use in daily activities and functions of their work. Coursework involves an introduction to and practice with vocabulary, communicative phrases and questions specific to business situations. Emphasis is placed on active participation and role playing. Reading and writing of business forms and transactions is also practiced. Previous knowledge of the Spanish language and culture is helpful, but not required. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1706 Business Office Employees II (1 Credits)
This course is a continuation of Spanish for Business Office Employees I. Coursework involves an introduction to and practice with vocabulary, communicative phrases and questions specific to business situations. Emphasis is placed on active participation and role playing. Reading and writing of business forms and transactions is also practiced. Previous knowledge of the Spanish language and culture is helpful, but not required. Prerequisites: SPAN 1705. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN1800 Conversational Spanish (2 Credits)
This course will focus on improving speaking and listening skills through practice in the Spanish language. Reading, writing, and culture will also be addressed throughout the course. Everyday situations will be presented incorporating the content areas. Class activities prompting discussions will utilize short stories, poems, dialogues, films, and guest speakers. Students will participate in Spanish during all class activities. Grammar structures will be reviewed within context. Prerequisite: SPAN 1001 or one year of high school Spanish or permission from the instructor. Este curso tendrá el énfasis de mejorar las habilidades de hablar y escuchar por la práctica en la lengua española. Leer, escribir y la cultura también serán puntos importantes por todo el curso. Las situaciones cotidianas van a estar presentadas incorporando los temas del contento. Las actividades de la clase incluirán las historias breves, los poemas, los diálogos, las conversaciones, las películas, los videos y los oradores invitados. Los estudiantes participarán en español durante todas las actividades de la clase. La gramática será revisada dentro del contento del curso. Prerrequisito: SPAN 1001 o un año de español en la escuela secundaria o el permiso de la profesora. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN2001 Intermediate Spanish I (4 Credits)
This course presents a comprehensive review and continued development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in accordance with the ACTFL (American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language) standards. It includes special emphasis on communicating ideas in conversation and in writing in order to increase proficiency. Cultural and literary materials acquaint students with the arts, literature, history, and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Class activities include discussion of current events, oral and written reports, role play, films, and use of authentic materials in Spanish. This course is intended for students who have successfully completed SPAN 1002, or approximately two years of high school Spanish. (MnTC 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN2002 Intermediate Spanish II (4 Credits)
This course is designed for students who have completed SPAN 1002 or approximately two years of high school Spanish. Course content focuses on strengthening speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish in accordance with the American Association of Teachers of Foreign Language (ACTFL) standards. Emphasis is placed on communicating ideas in conversation and composition. Cultural and literary materials develop an awareness and understanding of the arts, customs, history, culture, and literature of Spanish-speaking people and countries throughout the world. Extensive study creates a comparison of the cultural, social, and linguistic differences and similarities. (MnTC 8/GP); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

SPAN2100 Mexico Marvels (4 Credits)
This course involves an on-site introduction to the language and culture of Mexico in the city of Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. Upon arrival at the language school in Cuernavaca, students will be tested and placed in the appropriate class level according to their language ability. Daily instruction in Spanish is held in small classes with native instructors. Students participate in field study excursions to archeological sites and places of interest in principal cities, as well as seminars and lectures in the content area. Students participate in an immersion experience along with Spanish-speaking faculty guide. Pre-trip classes will provide valuable information to prepare students for the travel/study course. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

SPCH1100 Fundamentals of Speech (3 Credits)
This course focuses on the theory and practice of public communication including individual and group presentations. This course emphasizes audience analysis, research and organization, speech construction, delivery techniques, and speaking ethics. Students will prepare and deliver a variety of both individual and group presentations. Students should expect to reduce speech apprehension and develop self-confidence in their ability to communicate in public. MnTC (Goals 1/CM and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SPCH1200 Interpersonal Communication (3 Credits)
This course focuses on communicating more effectively in personal, social, and professional environments and examining the practical and theoretical aspects of human communication. The course also addresses such topics as self-esteem, listening, effective language, nonverbal communication, assertiveness, leadership, conflict, cultural communication, and computer-mediated communication. Human diversity issues and cultural/intercultural factors and how they affect human communication are examined. MnTC (Goals 1/CM 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

SPCH1310 Intercultural Communication (3 Credits)
This course examines the interconnections between communication and culture. Students will assess the impact of cultural perceptions and how they affect communication behaviors in real contexts and analyze how culture and language impact these behaviors and perceptions. Students read, observe, discuss, listen, explore, interview, present and react to how culture impacts communication processes. There will be an emphasis on learning communication skills to better enable students to communicate with people from other cultures. MnTC (Goals 1/C and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

STAT2021 Fundamentals of Statistics (4 Credits)
This course is an introduction of basic statistical methods including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, sampling problems in one and two sample estimation, hypothesis testing of means and proportions, Chi-square, analysis of variance, regression and an introduction to evaluating research. The use of a software statistical package (Minitab) is included in this course. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

THTR1001 Theatre Activities I (1 Credits)
This course allows students to gain credit for participation and work completed in a major theatrical production as an actor or technician. Student should plan on 40 hours of supervised work per semester credit. Students may obtain four total credits in theatre activities and may only register for one credit per semester. Registration for the credit must be during the semester in which the work is completed. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

THTR1002 Theatre Activities II (1 Credits)
This course allows students to gain credit for participation and work completed in a major theatrical production as an actor or technician. Student should plan on 40 hours of supervised work per semester credit. Students may obtain four total credits in theatre activities and may only register for one credit per semester. Registration for the credit must be during the semester in which the work is completed. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

THTR1100 Introduction to Theatre and Film (3 Credits)
This course will present an overview of theatre as an art, including a brief history of theatre as well as aspects of directing, acting and designing for the stage. The study of the 20th century art form of film will conclude the semester, focusing on American film and filming techniques from an historical perspective. Students will have the opportunity to study the influence of film and theatre on American culture through the viewing of specific films and plays. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

THTR1111 Movement for the Stage I (1 Credits)
This course will provide performers with the opportunity to study the integration of body and voice in character development. The purpose is to develop and strengthen the body through exercises in relaxation, body alignment, breathing, flexibility, and coordination. Also included are the basics of ballet, jazz, tap, folk, Renaissance and other forms of dance. Students may earn up to four credits in the movement sequence. Classes may be taken in any order. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

THTR1112 Movement for the Stage II (1 Credits)
This course will provide performers with the opportunity to study the integration of body and voice in character development. The purpose is to develop and strengthen the body through exercises in relaxation, body alignment, breathing, flexibility, and coordination. Also included are the basics of ballet, jazz, tap, folk, Renaissance and other forms of dance. Students may earn up to four credits in the movement sequence. Classes may be taken in any order. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

THTR1120 Stage Make-Up (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the skill and art of make-up design and application for actors on the stage or screen. Starting with the basic fundamentals of youth and age and continuing through special effects of latex and prosthetics, the student will use skills acquired to enhance character development. (3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

THTR1130 Stagecraft and Technology (3 Credits)
This hands-on course provides a practical approach to non-performance areas of theatre, focusing on stagecraft, lights and sound. Students will study traditional methods of set building and construction techniques along with contemporary aspects of theatre sound and lighting technology. Each student will be required to learn and observe safety rules while working in the scene shop and surrounding area. ( 3 Cr - 2 lect, 1 lab)

THTR2000 Current London Theatre (4 Credits)
This is a basic study of theatrical form, dramatic theory and criticism for the play-going experience of actual London theatre productions. The course is offered in conjunction with a travel-study tour of the British Isles with ample opportunity for visits to art galleries, theatres, museums and historic sites in the London area and beyond. (4Cr - 0 lect, 8 lab)

THTR2001 Theatre Activities III (1 Credits)
This course allows students to gain credit for participation and work completed in a major theatrical production as an actor or technician. Students may obtain four total credits in theatre activities and may only register for one credit per semester. Student should plan on 40 hours of supervised work per semester credit. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

THTR2002 Theatre Activities IV (1 Credits)
This course allows students to gain credit for participation and work completed in a major theatrical production as an actor or technician. Student should plan on 40 hours of supervised work per semester credit. Students may obtain four total credits in theatre activities and may only register for one credit per semester. Registration for the credit must be during the semester in which the work is completed. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

THTR2100 Beginning Acting (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of acting for stage and camera. The class is designed not only for those wanting to improve stage skills, but also for those wanting to present a confident edge needed whenever appearing before a group, personally or professionally. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

THTR2111 Movement for the Stage III (1 Credits)
This course will provide performers with the opportunity to study the integration of body and voice in character development. The purpose is to develop and strengthen the body through exercises in relaxation, body alignment, breathing, flexibility, and coordination. Also included are the basics of ballet, jazz, tap, folk, Renaissance and other forms of dance. Students may earn up to four credits in the movement sequence. Classes may be taken in any order. ( 1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

THTR2112 Movement for the Stage IV (1 Credits)
This course will provide performers with the opportunity to study the integration of body and voice in character development. The purpose is to develop and strengthen the body through exercises in relaxation, body alignment, breathing, flexibility, and coordination. Also included are the basics of ballet, jazz, tap, folk, Renaissance and other forms of dance. Students may earn up to four credits in the movement sequence. Classes may be taken in any order. (1 Cr - 0 lect, 1 lab)

THTR2222 Speech for Performance (3 Credits)
This skills course emphasizes voice production and voice analysis and improvement, including effective breathing, tone, resonance, articulation and pronunciation using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Students will share with the class selections of prose, poetry, drama and nonfiction demonstrating vocal quality and expression. The analysis of literary selections leads to effective performance choices for voice and body. Students should be aware that there are both academic and performance requirements within the class structure. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 7/HD); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

THTR2295 The Culture in London-London Dash Light (2 Credits)
Brit culture comes alive as students experience London and the surrounding area. This travel/study opportunity gives students a first-hand look at British theater, art, music, and daily culture. Tour with faculty members, or discover on your own, the great sights of London, including Trafalgar square, the Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, the British Museum, and historic sites. At night see The Royal Shakespeare Company or hear some of the world's greatest symphonies. Pre-dash classes help prepare students to gain the most from an exciting and memorable trip to what many call the world's greatest city. A short journey to Paris from London is also available. (Special fee) (2Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

THTR2297 The Culture of London - London Dash (4 Credits)
Brit culture comes alive as students experience London and the surrounding area. This travel/study opportunity gives students a first-hand look at British theater, art, music, and daily culture. Tour with faculty members, or discover on your own, the great sights of London, including Trafalgar square, the Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, the British Museum, and historic sites. At night see The Royal Shakespeare Company or hear some of the world's greatest symphonies. Pre-dash classes help prepare students to gain the most from an exciting and memorable trip to what many call the world's greatest city. A short journey to Paris from London is also available. (Special fee) (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)

THTR2300 Intermediate Acting (3 Credits)
This course is designed for students with some acting experience and the main focus is on creating a character vocally, physically and emotionally through script analysis. The use of Stanislavski's vocabulary while rehearsing and performing monologues and scenes will motivate students to explore the process of character building. Prerequisite: THTR 2100 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

THTR2400 Advanced Acting/Audition Techniques (3 Credits)
This course will provide experienced acting students an opportunity to develop their individual craft and acting methods. Advanced acting theories and techniques will be used in a variety of scene studies. Students will also prepare a variety of audition pieces to use in the transfer process or in the real world. Prerequisites: THTR 2100, THTR 2222, and THTR 2300 or instructor approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

THTR2500 Directing (3 Credits)
This course will provide experienced theatre students the opportunity to develop their individual craft and acting methods. Advanced acting theories and techniques will be used in a variety of scene studies. Students will also prepare a variety of audition pieces to use in the transfer process or in the real world. Prerequisites: THTR 2100, THTR 2222, and THTR 2300 or instructor's approval. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

THTR2600 USA Cultural Studies (2 Credits)
This travel/study course which allows participants to encounter the cultural offerings of one of the U.S.A.'s most vibrant cities for five days and four nights. Experienced faculty will provide a survey of exhibitions and performances in art, music, and theatre, as well as historical background and practical guidance. This trip offers access to arts experts and cultural experiences not available to most travelers or commercial tour groups, while allowing flexibility for exploration of individual interests. (2 Cr - 2 lect, 0 lab)

THTR2700 Musical Theatre (3 Credits)
This course is designed to give the student a survey of musical theatre history as well as performance techniques for the singing actor and the acting singer. Form and structure of the genre beginning with opera and ending with musicals of the 21st century will be studied. Also included will be auditioning for musical theatre as well as solo and ensemble performance. (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

THTR2900 AFA Portfolio (1 Credits)
This course will serve as the culmination of theatrical study and represents the capstone of the Associate in Fine Arts (AFA) degree. The final product will be a student created portfolio using current electronic media. This portfolio includes a live presentation of a sample of work, either from productions or from classes, monologues or scenes. This final presentation should be from 20-30 minutes in length per student and organized into an evening's entertainment with other class members. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. (1 Cr - 1 lect, 0 lab)

TRDR1100 Introduction to Vehicle Control (3 Credits)
This course introduces students to the world of transportation. Vehicle starting, turning, backing, and stopping are covered. Topics include how things are transported, rules and regulations, safe driving pointers, and starting in motion smoothly. Students begin to develop the skills needed for vehicle control. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

TRDR1105 Proficiency Development of Vehicle Control (3 Credits)
This course allows the students to gain proficiency in the skills learned in TRDR 1100. Students focus on the safe operation of the tractor and trailer. During this course, the students couple a tractor and trailer and operate the entire unit. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

TRDR1110 Advanced Operating Procedures (2 Credits)
This course allows the student to gain increased proficiency in coping with highway and traffic environments. Students develop perceptual skill allowing recognition and avoidance of emergency situations through proper handling of the vehicle. Students apply what has been learned in previous courses to "real world" scenarios. Students may be expected to transport a disabled auto to the auto repair shop, or a piece of farm machinery to the repair shop or back to the farm. Extended hours of operation are a large portion of this course in order to provide additional hands-on experience for students. (2 Cr - 0 lect, 2 lab)

TRDR1115 Lifestyle (3 Credits)
This course covers the lifestyle of the truck driver. Family and personal health and safety issues, human relations, and dealing with road rage are introduced. This course covers vehicle maintenance issues such as how various component systems of tractor-trailers work and allows students to recognize defect or failure likely to cause accident or breakdown. Other issues addressed are skills needed to seek, acquire, and retain employment as a truck driver. Time and money management skills are discussed as well as techniques for coping with the stresses of a driver's life. Non-vehicle activities such as protecting themselves, vehicle, cargo and the general public are covered. (3 Cr - 1 lect, 2 lab)

TRDR1120 Advanced Vehicle Driving (3 Credits)
This course covers higher level skills needed to deal effectively and safely with differing roadway hazards and traffic environments. Students experience "real world" driving scenarios. Extended road trips give the student the opportunity to experience and apply the skills acquired in this program. (3 Cr - 0 lect, 3 lab)

TRDR1130 Internship (8 Credits)
This course is designed to be the "gateway" to employment a company chosen by the student. This course takes the student on the job with the company of choice. Students are accompanied by a qualified driver finisher during this course. This course addresses most aspects of previous courses. Students may be compensated by the motor carrier to defray incurred personal expenses. (8 Cr - 0 lect, 8 lab)

WIND1000 Introduction to Wind Energy (3 Credits)
This course is a general introduction to wind turbines including the history and development of the wind energy industry, components of wind turbines, and how they work together to produce energy. An analysis of how the turbine converts wind to electrical power is also covered. Terminology associated with wind energy and the role of the wind turbine technician, how to measure the power in wind, and importance of proper site design of turbine, advantages and disadvantages of the different types of wind turbines, and estimating the total cost involved to produce green energy are discussed. Students research and review the growth and development of large and small wind locally and in the United States to discover the environmental, social, and economic impact of the industry. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)

WIND1002 Blade Technology (2 Credits)
This course introduces an overview of blades utilized in wind turbines for the small and commercial wind industries. Pitch motor and control circuitry involved in blades are detailed. Also included is an overview of design, materials, and types of blades utilized on both small and commercial wind turbines with a focus on how blades are constructed and maintained. Aerodynamics and blade efficiency are also covered. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (2 Cr - 1 lect, 1 lab)

WIND1003 Wiind Turbine Technology (4 Credits)
This course introduces basic wind turbine technology and its relationship to overall layout of the tower and novelle. Installation, operation, maintenance, troubleshooting and repair of electrical, electo-mechanical, and electronic equipment and systems are also covered. Technical support manuals, computer maintenance databases, and supervisor control and data acquisition (SCADA) are covered. This course is recognized as an Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) ISPQ Accredited Training Program for curriculum covering the Job Task Analyses for Small Wind Installer (NABCEP). (4 Cr - 2 lect, 2 lab)